» » Cotton Weaving and Designing 6th Edition

Cotton Weaving and Designing 6th Edition

Cotton Weaving and Designing
6th Edition
Category:
Title: Cotton Weaving and Designing 6th Edition
Release Date: 2018-04-23
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 33
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 80

Transcriber’s Notes

This e-text is based on ‘Cotton Weaving and Designing,’ from1909. Inconsistent spelling and hyphenation have been retained, butpunctuation and typographical errors have been corrected. Examplecalculations have been maintained; some erroneous figures in the tableshave been corrected.

The mid dot has been used as the decimal point (asin 3·0000). The ‘Mathematical Operators’ Unicode Block needs to besupported by the font installed in the reading device/software; specialcharacters used in this book are ‘therefore’ (∴), ‘square root’ (√),and others.

COTTON WEAVING AND DESIGNING


THE ELEMENTS OF COTTON SPINNING. By JOHN MORRIS andF. WILKINSON. With a Preface by Sir B. A. DOBSON,C.E., M.I.M.E. With 169 Diagrams and Illustrations. Crown 8vo.7s. 6d.

COTTON SPINNING CALCULATIONS AND YARN COSTS: A Practical andComprehensive Manual of Calculations, Yarn Costs and other Datainvolved in adapting the Machinery in all Sections, and for allGrades of Spinning and Doubling. By JAMES WINTERBOTTOM,Lecturer in Cotton Spinning, Municipal School of Technology,Manchester. With Diagrams and other Illustrations. 8vo. 7s. 6d.net.

JACQUARD WEAVING AND DESIGNING. By F. T. BELL,Medallist in Honours and Certificated Teacher in LinenManufacturing and in Weaving and Pattern Designing, City and Guildsof London Institute. With 199 Diagrams. 8vo. 12s. net.

PRINCIPLES OF WORSTED SPINNING. By HOWARDPRIESTMAN. With 118 Illustrations. 8vo. 7s. 6d. net.

PRINCIPLES OF WOOLLEN SPINNING.
By HOWARD PRIESTMAN.With 111 Diagrams. 8vo. 9s. net.

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

LONDON, NEW YORK, BOMBAY, AND CALCUTTA


COTTON WEAVING
AND
DESIGNING

BY

JOHN T. TAYLOR

LATE LECTURER ON COTTON WEAVING AND DESIGNING IN THEPRESTON, ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE, CHORLEY, AND TODMORDEN TECHNICAL SCHOOLSAND ON SILK WEAVING AND DESIGNING IN THE MACCLESFIELD TECHNICAL SCHOOLAUTHOR OF DESIGNS FOR COTTON FABRICS, ETC., IN‘THE TEXTILE MANUFACTURER’

REVISED UNDER THE DIRECTION

OF

F. WILKINSON

DIRECTOR OF THE TEXTILE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOL,BOLTON

AND

H. NISBET

WEAVING MASTER OF THE TEXTILE SCHOOL, BOLTON

SIXTH EDITION

WITH NUMEROUS DIAGRAMS

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON
NEW YORK, BOMBAY, AND CALCUTTA

1909

All rights reserved


[Pg v]

REVISER’S PREFACE

TO FIFTH EDITION

TAYLORS “Cotton Weaving” has for many years enjoyed a reputation amongStudents who have attended Day and Evening Classes in Textile Weavingand Designing.

It has, however, been found wanting in some important features, andothers have needed expansion so as to bring the work up to modernrequirements.

A further Edition having been called for, has afforded the opportunityof having these deficiencies remedied by the addition of matters whichwill put the book in line with the latest improvements in this sectionof the Mechanical Arts. Chapter I., on preparatory processes, has beenentirely rewritten and enlarged. My obligations are many to Mr. H.Nisbet, Weaving and Designing Master here, who has kindly carried outthis work. Some chapters have had new and important features added,and many drawings are included for the first time, either as newillustrations, or in place of others which had become obsolete.[Pg vi] Forthese drawings I am indebted to the same gentleman, who has made thisclass of work a speciality.

Other chapters have been expanded, and partly rewritten. I should liketo say, in conclusion, that while the book was passing through thepress the assistance of Mr. Nisbet has been most helpful.

FRED. WILKINSON,
Director.

TEXTILE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOL,
BOLTON,
February, 1905.

PREFACE TO SIXTH EDITION

ANOTHER Edition having been called for has given opportunity for arevision of the work in several directions. The most notable additionis that of Chapter IX., which is quite new and deals with AutomaticWeft-replenishing Devices. It is hoped this will be of considerablehelp in giving weaving students clear ideas on a phase of the subjectwhich is growing rapidly, and will tend to still greater importanceas increased production becomes more necessary. Quite a number of newillustrations have been substituted for old ones.

FRED. WILKINSON,
Director.

TEXTILE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOL,
BOLTON,
November, 1909.

[Pg vii]

CONTENTS

CHAPTER
 
PAGE
I.
PREPARATORY PROCESSES
1
II.
HAND AND POWER LOOMS
48
III.
DROP AND CIRCULAR BOX LOOMS
107
IV.
DOBBIES
123
V.
MISCELLANEOUS
132
VI.
JACQUARD WEAVING
137
VII.
LENO WEAVING
173
VIII.
TERRY LOOMS—CARD CUTTING—LAPPETS
187
IX.
AUTOMATIC WEFT—REPLENISHING DEVICES
198
X.
THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGNING
218
XI.
FIGURED DESIGN
278
XII.
TEXTILE CALCULATIONS
307
 
INDEX
347

[Pg 1]

COTTON WEAVING AND DESIGNING

CHAPTER I
PREPARATORY PROCESSES

YARN intended for manufacture into cloth requires to pass throughvarious stages of preparation, the character of which depends upon theclass of fabrics to be produced. Thus, some systems of treatment arebetter adapted for the preparation of yarn for grey cloths (i.e. ofthe native colour of cotton), some for mono-coloured, and others formulti-coloured, fabrics. The choice of a system is often arbitrary, andcan only be made from a knowledge of local or special requirements.

The operations involved in the preparation of warps for most fabricsare comprised under not less than five chief divisions, namely—

1. Winding yarn from any of its earlier stages on to warpers’ bobbins.

2. Warping.

3. Sizing.

4. Beaming, or winding yarn on to a weaver’s beam.

5. Looming, i.e. either drawing-in or twisting-in.

Each of these operations may be performed by a variety of machines ofdistinctly different types that have been specially devised to meetspecific requirements, and which are, therefore,[Pg 2] better adapted thanothers for their special purpose. Before introducing the reader to thedetails of the various types of machines in each division, it willbe better to briefly enumerate the different systems of preparationusually adopted in the manufacture of the three classes of goods namedabove.

PREPARATION OF GREY WARPS.

Grey warps are prepared by one or other of two systems, namely, (1)Beam warping, for slasher or tape sizing; and, (2) ball or millwarping, for ball or warp sizing; but by far the greater number areprepared by the first-named system.

1. Beam Warping and Slasher Sizing.

This system comprises the following operations, namely—

1. Winding yarn from cops, ring, or throstle bobbins on to warpers’bobbins, by means of a “spindle” or “cop” winding machine.

2. Beam warping, whereby yarn is transferred, in the form of a widesheet, from warpers’ bobbins on to a large flanged beam.

3. Slasher or tape sizing, whereby yarn is withdrawn from severalbeams, termed “back” or “slashers’” beams, to be sized, andsubsequently re-wound by the same machine on to a weaver’s beam bysimultaneous operations.

4. Looming, by which the threads of a new warp are placed in a loomready for weaving.

2. Ball Warping and Sizing.

This system comprises the following operations, namely—

1. Winding yarn from cops or ring bobbins on to warpers’ bobbins.

[Pg 3]

2. Ball warping, in which a number of threads are withdrawn fromwarpers’ bobbins and condensed into the form of a rope of untwistedstrands. This operation may be accomplished by several types ofmachines. The one usually employed is the old-fashioned warping mill,which coils warp-ends on to a large revolving reel or swift, from whichthey are subsequently withdrawn and formed into a large ball. Ballwarps are also sometimes formed direct from warpers’ bobbins; alsosometimes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 80
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net