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The Historians' History of the World in Twenty-Five Volumes, Volume 05 The Roman Republic

The Historians' History of the World in Twenty-Five Volumes, Volume 05
The Roman Republic
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Title: The Historians' History of the World in Twenty-Five Volumes, Volume 05 The Roman Republic
Release Date: 2018-05-14
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Transcriber’s Note: As a result of editorial shortcomings in the original,some reference letters in the text don’t have matching entries in thereference-lists, and vice versa.

[i]

THE HISTORIANS’ HISTORY OF THE WORLD


[ii]

LIVY

[iii]


[iv]

THE HISTORIANS’
HISTORY
OF THE WORLD

A comprehensive narrative of the rise and development of nations
as recorded by over two thousand of the great writers of
all ages: edited, with the assistance of a distinguished
board of advisers and contributors,
by
HENRY SMITH WILLIAMS, LL.D.

(decorative, publisher’s mark) PRIUS PLACENDUM QUAM DOCENDUM

IN TWENTY-FIVE VOLUMES
VOLUME V—THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

The Outlook Company
New York

The History Association
London

1904

[v]

Copyright, 1904,
By HENRY SMITH WILLIAMS
.

All rights reserved.


[vi]

Contributors, and Editorial Revisers.

  • Prof. Adolf Erman, University of Berlin.
  • Prof. Joseph Halévy, College of France.
  • Prof. Thomas K. Cheyne, Oxford University.
  • Prof. Andrew C. McLaughlin, University of Michigan.
  • Prof. David H. Müller, University of Vienna.
  • Prof. Alfred Rambaud, University of Paris.
  • Prof. Eduard Meyer, University of Berlin.
  • Dr. James T. Shotwell, Columbia University.
  • Prof. Theodor Nöldeke, University of Strasburg.
  • Prof. Albert B. Hart, Harvard University.
  • Dr. Paul Brönnle, Royal Asiatic Society.
  • Dr. James Gairdner, C.B., London.
  • Prof. Ulrich von Wilamowitz Möllendorff, University of Berlin.
  • Prof. H. Marnali, University of Budapest.
  • Dr. G. W. Botsford, Columbia University.
  • Prof. Julius Wellhausen, University of Göttingen.
  • Prof. Franz R. von Krones, University of Graz.
  • Prof. Wilhelm Soltau, Zabern University.
  • Prof. R. W. Rogers, Drew Theological Seminary.
  • Prof. A. Vambéry, University of Budapest.
  • Prof. Otto Hirschfeld, University of Berlin.
  • Baron Bernardo di San Severino Quaranta, London.
  • Prof. F. York Powell, Oxford University.
  • Dr. John P. Peters, New York.
  • Dr. S. Rappoport, School of Oriental Languages, Paris.
  • Prof. Hermann Diels, University of Berlin.
  • Prof. C. W. C. Oman, Oxford University.
  • Prof. I. Goldziher, University of Vienna.
  • Prof. W. L. Fleming, University of West Virginia.
  • Prof. R. Koser, University of Berlin.

[vii]

CONTENTS

VOLUME V
ROME
PAGE
INTRODUCTORY ESSAYS
The World Influence of Early Rome. By Dr. Eduard Meyer 1
The Scope and Development of Early Roman History. By Dr. Wilhelm Soltau 11
BOOK I.—EARLY ROMAN HISTORY TO THE FALL OF THE REPUBLIC
Introduction 25
CHAPTER I
Land and People 43
The land of Italy, 44. Early population of Italy, 48. Beginnings of Rome and the primitive Roman commonwealth, 51.
CHAPTER II
Early Legends of Rome—Æneas and Romulus (ca. 753-716 B.C.) 58
The Æneas legend, 59. The Ascanius legend, 60. The legend of Romulus and Remus, 61. The rape of the Sabines, 63. A critical study of the legends, 66. Explanation of the Æneas legend, 69. The Romulus legend examined, 70.
CHAPTER III
Legendary History of the Kings (ca. 716-510 B.C.) 75
Numa Pompilius, 75. Tullus Hostilius, 76. The combat of the Horatii and the Curiatii, 77. Ancus Marcius, 79. L. Tarquinius Priscus, 80. Servius Tullius, 82. [viii]Lucius Tarquinius the Tyrant, 83.
CHAPTER IV
The Banishment of the Kings—Criticisms of Monarchial History (ca. 510 B.C.) 85
Tarquinius consults the oracle, 85. The rape of Lucretia, 86. Niebuhr on the story of Lucretia, 87. The banishment of Tarquinius, 88. Porsenna’s war upon the Romans; the story of Horatius at the bridge, as told by Dionysius, 90. Caius Mucius and King Porsenna, 92. Battle of Lake Regillus, 93. The myths of the Roman kings critically examined, 95. The historical value of the myths, 100.
CHAPTER V
Civilisation of the Regal Period (ca. 753-510 B.C.) 103
Organisation of the state, 103. The status of the monarchy, 105. Religion, 107. Constitution, 107. The organisation of the army, 111. Classes of foot soldiers, 112. Popular institutions, 113. The wealth of the Romans and its sources, 115. Roman education, 117. Morals and politics of the age, 118. The fine arts, 119.
CHAPTER VI
The First Century of the Republic (510-391 B.C.) 121
Plebeians and patricians, 123. Spurius Cassius and the first Agrarian Law, 129. The institution of the decemvirate, 131. The story of Virginia told by Dionysius, 132. Fall of the decemvirate, 138. The Canuleian Law, 140. External wars, 142. Legends of the Volscian and Æquian wars, 145. Coriolanus and the Volscians, 145. Critical examination of the story of Coriolanus, 148. Cincinnatus and the Æquians, 149. Critical examination of the story of Cincinnatus, 151. The Fabian Gens and the Veientines, 152.
CHAPTER VII
The Invasion of the Gauls and its Sequel (391-351 B.C.) 154
The Gauls, 155. Livy’s account of the Gauls in Rome, 156. Other accounts of the departure of the Gauls, 165. Niebuhr on the conduct of the Romans, 166. Sequel of the Gallic War, 167. The Licinian rogations, 170. Equalisation of the two orders, 172. External affairs, 175.
CHAPTER VIII
The Conquest of Central Italy (423-280 B.C.) 178
The Samnites, 178. The First Samnite War, 180. The Latin War, 183. The Second Samnite War, 186. The Third Samnite and Etruscan wars, 194. Lucanian, Gallic, and Etruscan wars, 199.
[ix]CHAPTER IX
The Completion of the Italian Conquest (281-265 B.C.) 201
Pyrrhus in Italy, 203. The final reduction of Italy, 209. Government of the acquired territory, 210. Prefectures; municipalities, 211. Colonies; free and confederate states, 212.
CHAPTER X
The First Punic War (326-218 B.C.) 215
Causes of the First Punic War, 217. The war begins, 219. First period, 219. Second period, 221. Polybius’ account of Roman affairs, 224. Third period, 230. Events between the First and Second Punic wars, 233. Hamilcar and Hannibal, 237.
CHAPTER XI
First Half of the Second Punic War (218-211 B.C.) 241
First period, 241. Polybius’ account of the crossing of the Alps, 244. Hannibal in Italy, 249. Second period, 260.
CHAPTER XII
Close of the Second Punic War (210-202 B.C.) 269
Third period, 269. The death of Hasdrubal described by Polybius, 276. Rejoicing at Rome; Nero’s inhumanity and triumph, 277. The fourth and last period of the war, 278. The character of Scipio, 278. Scipio in Spain, 279. Scipio returns to Rome, 283. Scipio invades Africa, 284. The battle of Zama described by Polybius, 287. Terms dictated to Carthage; Scipio’s triumph, 292. An estimate of Hannibal, 294.
CHAPTER XIII
The Macedonian and Syriac Wars and the Third Punic War (200-131 B.C.) 296
The Macedonian War; war with Antiochus III, 296. Affairs of Carthage, 304. Outbreak of the Third Punic War, 305. Appian’s account of the destruction of
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