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Colored girls and boys' inspiring United States history and a heart to heart talk about white folks

Colored girls and boys' inspiring United States history
and a heart to heart talk about white folks
Title: Colored girls and boys' inspiring United States history and a heart to heart talk about white folks
Release Date: 2018-05-19
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 75
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A number of typographical errors(punctuation, reversal and duplication of letters on words, etc.)in the original have been corrected.
(etext-transcriber's note.)

SERVICE OUR MISSION.
(Graduating Class Motto)

[Image unavailable.]

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Jr.,

As a hustling agent delivering his popular book, which (by makingthe saddest person laugh, the jolliest person cry and the mostthoughtless person think), is selling itself like buckwheat cakesand sausage steaming-hot some frosty morn or cool refreshing icecream when the sun is very warm.

C O L O R E D
GIRLS AND BOYS’
INSPIRING

U N I T E D   S T A T E S
H I S T O R Y
AND A
HEART   TO   HEART   TALK
ABOUT
W H I T E   F O L K S
BY
William Henry Harrison, Jr.


COPYRIGHT 1921
BY
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON. Jr.
{1}

450

THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED
TO THOSE COLORED GIRLS AND BOYS
UPON WHOSE NOBLE EFFORTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS
WILL REST THE FOUNDATIONS FOR
THE FUTURE SUCCESS OF

THE NEGRO RACE:
AND
TO ALL THOSE WHITE WOMEN AND MEN
WHOSE KIND ENCOURAGEMENT OF AND JUST
DEALINGS WITH ALL HUMANITY ARE BRINGING
ABOUT BETTER UNDERSTANDING AND GREATER
CO-OPERATIONS BETWEEN

WHITE AND COLORED PEOPLE.
{2}

COMPOSED—COMPILED—WRITTEN
ARRANGED—DESIGNED
AND
ORIGINAL DRAWINGS
MADE FROM ALONG
THE FAMOUS PICTURESQUE LEHIGH VALLEY
OF PENNSYLVANIA, U. S. A.
BY
WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, Jr.
{3}

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Actors233
Agriculture96
Architects186
Army Officers57
Artists184
Athletics203
 
Bankers118
Baseball213
Basketball218
Bishops73
Boley, Okla.40
Books154
Business114
Business Schools113
Business People122
 
Churches65
City Officers45
Civil War26
Colleges, Colored161
Colleges, White160
Colonial War17
Colored Women’s Clubs    86
Composers200
Congressmen42
 
Dentists175
Diplomats43
 
Elocutionists239
 
Field Sports205
Folklore Songs36
Football204
 
Fraternal Orders128-252-253
 
Golfing231
 
Higher Education159
Hospitals174
 
Industrial Education106
Insurance125
Inventions176
 
Lawyers130
Liberty Bonds{4}61
 
Magazines148
Marcus Garvey95
Medicine170
Mexican War21
Ministers73
Music188
 
N.A.A.C.P.245
Newspapers135
“Negro Servants”10
Negro Business League89
Nurses174
 
Orators157
 
Pan-African Congress92
Pianists198
Plantation Morals30
Poets180
Prize Fighters220
 
Reconstruction Days38
Real Estate121
Revolutionary War18
Rowing227
Rural Schools110
 
Science164
Sculptors187
Singers192
Slaves10
Skating230
Spanish American War47
State Legislators45
Spingarn Medalists94
Statisticians157
Sunday Schools78
Swimming228
 
Tennis230
Theaters239
 
Underground R. R.22
Urban League248
 
Violinists195
 
War of 181219
White Friends242
World War49
 
Y. M. C. A.83
Y. W. C. A.79

{5}

AUTHOR’S PREFACE
Not to Boast but to Boost

Negroes should find great pride indeed
In Race progress herein they read;
But to such readers let me tell
This book means not our heads to swell;
For five of the greatest rich white men
Could buy the wealth of our Race: and then!
So this book is neither a brag nor boast
But just to inspire our younger host
To elevate their racial name
From poisoned stains of slavery shame,
By climbing to the highest heights
Thro aid of friends who are “real whites”.

TWENTY-FIVE years ago, when a lad fifteen years old attending the publicschools of Pennsylvania, in which State I was born and reared, certainideas and sentiments caused me to secretly resolve that some day, when Ihad gotten together the necessary data, I would write just such a bookas is contained herein. At the time that resolution was formed, I wasattending the Darlington School in Middletown District, Delaware Countyover which Prof. A. G. C. Smith was Superintendent. And I remember withmuch gratefulness my first and last public school teachers, MissesCarrie V. Hamilton and Rebecca R. Crumley and Prof. Smith for their kindand frequent words to me as encouragement to continue my education aftergraduating from the public schools.

My favorite study was the United States History, and even at the tenderage of fifteen years, I was greatly surprised and Race pridely hurt notto find any history, except about slavery, in such books concerning theAmerican Negro. I had such childish confidence in my school books andtheir authors that I felt sure if Negroes had fought and died in theseveral American wars; had become great poets, orators, artists,sculptors, etc., the histories I was studying would have mentioned such.I thought in doing that they would have been preserving United Statesvaluable history more so than merely giving just credit to the Coloredpeople who had made such history. I did not know that right then theattentions of many public school{6} children in far away Europe were oftencalled to the histories of such distinguished Colored Americans asPhyllis Wheatley, the poetess; Frederick Douglas, the orator; Henry O.Tanner, the artist; Edmonia Lewis, the sculptoress—all of them havingwon recognition and fame in Europe as well as in America.

My youthful ignorance, regarding the achievements of my race, is easilyexplained when it is taken into consideration that I was a farmer boyliving far from libraries I had never seen and Negro histories I hadnever heard about. And the United States histories then used in thepublic schools had nothing in them to enlighten me on that subject. Theymisled and kept me, along with thousands of other Colored schoolchildren, in absolute ignorance relative to the progress and attainmentsof the American Colored people. So whenever our history classes went upto recite and my white classmates proudly went through the lessons aboutGeneral George Washington, Noah Webster, Benjamin Franklin, Eli Whitney,Longfellow, etc., while I knew and could just as easily recite suchhistory, nevertheless, my feelings of crushed race pride andmortification were beyond expression because not one thing could Iproudly recite from my lessons about great things my people hadaccomplished in America.

It is the same with the United States histories used in our publicschools of today. They do not relate about Crispus Attucks, a Negrosoldier and the first Colonist martyr to give his life for America inthe Revolutionary War; nor about the Colored sailor, William Tillman,who received six thousand dollars from the Federal Government forrecapturing a stolen schooner from the Rebels in the Civil War; norabout the Colored Registrars of the United States Treasury, B. K. Bruce,J. W. Lyons, W. T. Vernon and J. C. Napier, whose names, duringdifferent administrations covering a period of more than thirty years,appeared on all the United States paper money made and issued duringthat period; nor about Matthew A. Henson, who was with Commodore Pearywhen he (Peary) discovered the North Pole; nor about Booker T.Washington, one of the greatest orators America has ever produced andalso{7} builder of one of the most famous institutions of learning notonly in America but in the world.

As I said before, I knew nothing about such Negro history while I was afarmer’s boy, but I could never quite rid myself of a feeling that theColored people in the United States did have a worthy history. I studiedthe white man’s U. S. History from cover to cover and learned all Icould from it, but I got no more racial inspiration from it than a whiteboy would get from studying only a Negro history in which nothing waswritten about his own racial achievements. So I secretly resolved toimmediately begin to quietly and patiently research for American Negrodata in order to some day publish a book so that future Colored schoolchildren would not be kept in ignorance about their own race history. Ifelt it was perfectly right and necessary to study the white man’shistory at the school desks, but if Colored children were not permittedto study the history of their own race at the same desks, it wasperfectly right and necessary that Colored children learn about theachievements of their great men and women at their home firesides withintheir family circles.

So for the benefit mostly of Colored youths, here are the crude resultsof my boyhood resolutions and manhood efforts after twenty-five yearsfilled with trying discouragements, and bitter disappointments, but alsojust as full of unswerving determinations, constant hopefulness, upwardclimbs, ceaseless works and fervent prayers to God to succeed.

The author wishes to use this place and opportunity to express hisdeepest thanks to the more than one hundred prominent Colored men andwomen, living in as many large cities in all parts of the United States,who so friendly sent to him up-to-date information regarding theprogress and success of Colored people in those cities.

For the unusual generosity and kindness in giving of their valuable timeto personally and helpfully send to him exceptionally fitting andauthentic Negro data, the writer most courteous{8}ly acknowledges andgratefully names the following distinguished Colored and whitecontributors;

Mr. Cleveland G. Allen, New York City, N. Y., Associate Editor ofthe New York Home News, and Lecturer on Negro Music in the PublicSchools of New York City.

Rev. G. W. Allen, D. D., Editor & Manager of Southern ChristianRecorder, Nashville, Tenn.

Attorney Violette N. Anderson, foremost woman lawyer in Chicago,Ill., and one of the most prominent Colored women in her professionin America.

Rev. F. P. Baker, prominent minister in Evansville, Ind.

Miss Eva D. Bowles, New York City, N. Y., Executive Secretary incharge of Colored Work of the Young Women’s Christian Association.

Mr. Thomas F. Blue, Head of Colored Library, Louisville, Ky.

Miss Mabel S. Brady, Branch Y. W. C. A. Secretary, Kansas City, Mo.

Rev. Geo. F. Bragg, prominent minister and author of Baltimore, Md.

Mr. Chas. H. Brooks, Phila., Pa., Sec’y of Cherry Bldg. & LoanAss’n, and prominent in insurance business.

Captain Walter R. Brown, Assistant Commandant, Hampton Institute,Va.

Rev. Russell S. Brown, prominent minister in Atlanta, Ga.

Mr. Walter A. Butler, San Francisco, Cal., Financier and Presidentof the Northern California Branch of the N. A. A. C. P.

Rev. H. W. Childs, D. D., LL. D., prominent minister in Pittsburgh,Pa., and member of the Executive Board of New England BaptistConvention.

Dr. J. B. Claytor, prominent physician in Roanoke, Va.

Mr. M. L. Collins, Editor of Shreveport Sun, Shreveport, La.

Prof. J. W. Cromwell, Historian, and instructor of higher educationin Washington, D.C.

Mr. A. G. Dill, New York City, Editor of The Brownies’

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