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The Forest Beyond the Woodlands A Fairy Tale

The Forest Beyond the Woodlands
A Fairy Tale
Category:
Title: The Forest Beyond the Woodlands A Fairy Tale
Release Date: 2018-08-05
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 13
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Contents.

List of Illustrations
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{1}

THE FOREST
BEYOND
THE WOODLANDS

{2}

BORZOI BOOKS
FOR CHILDREN

A Little Boy Lost by W. H. Hudson
“In its sense of reality and in the unity of childhood with wildnature, I know of no book with which to compare it.... I believethat its appeal will be to children of different ages and to everygrown person who has any love of beauty or remembrance ofchildhood. It is a wonderful book to read aloud tochildren.”—Annie Carroll Moore in The Bookman.
“Miss Lathrop’s illustrations for ‘A Little Boy Lost’ and for ‘TheThree Mulla-Mulgars’ have placed her, at a bound, in the first rankof American imaginative illustrators.”—Chicago Evening Post.
Beautifully illustrated in full color and black and white by Dorothy P.Lathrop.
The Three Mulla-Mulgars by Walter de la Mare
“The story concerns the adventures of three monkeys of royal bloodwho have left their hut in the African jungle to seek the wonderfulkingdom of their Uncle.... A tale of strange creatures and strangelandscapes, of adventures and misadventures in faery forests. Oneof those rare books that everyone will love.”—Chicago EveningPost.
Illustrated in full color and black and white by Dorothy P. Lathrop.
The Forest Beyond the Woodlands by Mildred Kennedy
“A fairy story made up of the ideally right and reliable magic—thebird-song guiding like a silver thread, through a quest thatcarries us through all manner of portents and crouching perils torare delights beyond far horizons.... Made doubly delightful by theinclusion of fifteen really extraordinary silhouettes done for thebook by Miss Vianna Knowlton.”—Helen Thomas Follett.
The Wonder World We Live In by Adam Gowans Whyte
A book that makes the foundations of real science more thrilling,more romantic, and more simply comprehensible than the usualpseudo-scientific books for children, and that will delight anychild whose eyes are opening to the wonders of theworld.—Profusely illustrated.
Prince Melody in Music Land by Elizabeth Simpson
“A very delightful book for children. The author has translatedmuch of the dry technique of music lore into a series of connectedfairy stories. Children will enjoy while learning.”—PhiladelphiaLedger.
Illustrations by Mary Virginia Martin.

{3} 

The FORESTBEYONDTHE WOODLANDSA Fairy Tale ByMildred KennedyWith silhouettes byVianna KnowltonNew York ALFRED·A·KNOPF 1921

{4}

COPYRIGHT, 1921, BY
ALFRED A. KNOPF, Inc.

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
{5}

TO
Florence A. Browne
the mother of
Ken and Dick
FOR WHOM THIS TALE WAS WRITTEN

{6} 

{7} 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER   PAGE
IDAVID 13
IITHE BLUE BIRD’S TRAIL25
IIITHE LITTLE DOOR IN THE TREE TRUNK33
IVAT THE COBBLER’S COTTAGE41
VTHE MANSION OF HAPPINESS57
VITHE PALACE OF THE BRONZE KING71
VIIIN THE PALACE81
VIIIA MESSAGE FROM RUTH87
IXTHE HUT IN THE FOREST101
XTHE WINGED HORSE111
XITHE DAY BEFORE THE WEDDING118
XIITHE RESCUE129
XIIITHE BURNING MOUNTAIN138
XIVTHE GARDEN145

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{9} 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

 FACING
PAGE
“HERE,” SAID DAVID, “TAKE THIS BIRCH CUP—”22
DAVID RAN TO THE FOOT OF THE TREE, FASTENED THE HEAD OF HIS AX IN THE HOLE30
“FOLLOW YOUR NOSE TILL YOU GET THERE,” DAVID LOOKED UP AT HIM IN SURPRISE38
THE MONTHS PASSED BY AND DAVID AND RUTH WORKED AND WORKED FOR THE COBBLER46
THE NEXT NIGHT THE MOON SHONE BRIGHTLY. DAVID HAD JUST CRAWLED INTO BED70
SHE ROSE TO HER FEET, STRETCHED HER HANDS TOWARD THE GREAT BRIGHT SUN AND PRAYED74
THE LARGE ROSE-GARDEN ENCLOSED BY THE HIGH BRICK WALL WAS THE ONLY SPOT OUTSIDE THE PALACE ITSELF, WHERE RUTH WAS PERMITTED TO WANDER82
FAR AWAY IN THE DISTANCE HE SAW THE PALACE OF THE GREAT BRONZE KING88
KNEELING BESIDE A LOW OAK CHEST HE TOOK A RUSTY KEY AND FITTED THIS INTO THE WORN KEYHOLE106
“YOU MUST TAKE ME TO THE BRONZE KING’S DOMAIN”116
SO SHE SANG ONE AFTER ANOTHER THE SONGS THAT SHE AND DAVID HAD LOVED122{10}
“THIS WAY, RUTH, THIS WAY,” WHISPERED DAVID128
THEY TOLD ONE ANOTHER OF ALL THAT HAD TAKEN PLACE138
“WELCOME, CHILDREN,” SHE SAID, “WELCOME TO YOUR COTTAGE”150

{11} 

THE FOREST
BEYOND
THE WOODLANDS

{12} 

{13} 

CHAPTER I
DAVID

DAVID was the son of an honest wood-cutter. He lived with his father ina little cottage on the border of the woodlands. Away, away as far asthe eye could see stretched great tree-covered hills and mountains. Thisvast area was called, by the people of the country, the Dark Forest.

Some feared the mysteries of this unknown and unexplored region, forthere were many stories and superstitions concerning giants, gnomes, andelves who dwelt within its shaded wilderness. But David, ever since hecould remember, had always had a friendly feeling for the rough, hardbark{14} of a pine or oak tree; and the fringed softness of the paper birchhad been a delight to him ever since the day he first noticed its raggedbeauty—a late summer afternoon on which, as he returned to his father’scottage, the setting sun touched the whiteness of the tree-trunk beneaththe cool green of its shining leaves.

“Some day I shall go far into the Forest,” he would say to himself. “Whoknows what treasures I may find?”

David grew fast and was strong, for his life in the woodlands was one tomake any boy well and happy. He learned his father’s trade, and in ashort time, although he was not nearly full grown, he could wield an axeas well as many a grown man; in fact, he could put some men to shame,for his skill was far greater than that of the average boy of his age.{15}

One day, while walking along a narrow path used by the wood-cutters, hemet an old, old woman. Her dress was brown and made of a coarsehomespun. A large basket strapped to her back was filled with pieces offirewood which she had been gathering. When she saw David she called tohim. And as he approached her he noticed how beautiful she was; for,although her clothes were ragged, that mattered little—her face seemedmore kind and beautiful than any he had ever seen. Her hair—one lockhad fallen from beneath the brown cap that she wore—was white as drivensnow. Her eyes were the soft colour of oak leaves in winter, and sofilled with gentleness that David could only stand and look at her.

“Can you tell me,” she asked in a voice that sounded like a breath ofwind stirring through the pine needles, “can you tell me{16} where I canfind a bit of water? I have been all day in the woods and have found nospring or brook; and I am thirsty, so thirsty! for a drink of pure, coolmountain water.”

“Yes!” cried David. “There is a beautiful spring not far from here. Iwill get some of the water for you. Rest here in the shade till Ireturn: it will take me but a few moments.”

As he spoke he lifted her basket, that she might the more easily slipher arms through the leathern straps that served to hold it in placeupon her back. She swung her clumsy burden to the ground and thankedhim; and as soon as he saw her comfortably seated on a bed of mossbeneath a sheltering tree, he hastened on his way towards the spring.

As he walked along he took out his hunting knife. For first he must finda birch tree: he wanted some of its white bark to{17} make a cup in whichto carry the water. Soon he came to a beautiful great tree. Cutting aclean wide strip of bark, he shaped it into a bowl-like receptacle. Nexthe pinned the edges together with twigs, so whittled to a point thatthey would pierce the bark and hold it in place. Then, hastening to thespring, he filled the birchen cup to overflowing with the clear, coolcrystal water. In a few moments he stood before the old woman again andhanded her the dripping cup. She took it, drank deeply, and wasrefreshed.

David gazed upon her. There was something about her that he could notexplain; nor could he explain to himself his strange longing to talk toher. She looked up at him and smiled; then she motioned to him to sitdown on the moss beside her. David did so.{18}

“Do you live in these woods?” he asked timidly. “I do not remember everhaving seen you before.”

“No,” answered the old woman. “My house is a long, long way fromhere—yet not so very far away, either, if only one is wise enough tofollow the trail and not seek any short cuts.”

“Does the trail we are on lead to your home?” asked David, pointing tothe woodpath that stretched away before them, seeming to lose itself farin the distance.

“Yes and no,” answered the old woman. “It leads you there if you knowhow to follow it—but there are many turnings, and some of them willlead you right and some of them will lead you wrong. It is not alwayseasy to know which one to take, and if you choose the wrong one it willlead you far astray.{19}

“Dear me!” said David, “it is too bad the way is not more clearlymarked.”

“It never is,” said the old woman, “and it never can be, for each yearthe new leaves grow up to cover the old trail, and each year a new trailhas to be found. In fact, each one has to make his own trail, even whenhe seems to be following another’s and deceives himself into thinkingthat he is doing so. It is the law of the Forest, for any trail otherthan the one we make ourselves may lead us where we do not desire to go,and all at once we find ourselves deep in the woods, the path lost andwe ourselves lost. No: we have to know where we are going and why we aregoing there. Then, when we know thus much for sure, there is always somesign to follow that will prevent us from losing the way. So you see,although I may start out on this path, that does not mean{20} I shallfollow it all the way; it depends upon the way the bird flies.”

“What bird?” asked David.

“The Blue Bird,” answered the old Woman.

“There are no blue birds in these woodlands,” said David. “I have livedhere all my life

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