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In Savage Africa The adventures of Frank Baldwin from the Gold Coast to Zanzibar.

In Savage Africa
The adventures of Frank Baldwin from the Gold Coast to Zanzibar.
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Title: In Savage Africa The adventures of Frank Baldwin from the Gold Coast to Zanzibar.
Release Date: 2018-08-01
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 35
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Contents.

List of Illustrations
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(etext transcriber's note)

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On the Look-Out.

Page 48.

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IN SAVAGE AFRICA

BY
Verney Lovett Cameron, C.B., D.C.L.,
Commander Royal Navy.

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Surf-Boat Capsized.

Page 82.



Thomas Nelson and Sons,
LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK.

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In Savage Africa

OR,
The Adventure of Frank Baldwin
From the Gold Coast
To Zanzibar.

BY
VERNEY LOVETT CAMERON, C.B., D.C.L.,
COMMANDER ROYAL NAVY;
AUTHOR OF “JACK HOOPER,” “ACROSS AFRICA,”
“OUR FUTURE HIGHWAY,”
ETC. ETC.

—————
With Thirty-Two Illustrations.
—————
London:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.
———
1887.

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Contents.

I.LEAVING SCHOOL,9
II.OFF TO SEA,24
III.UNPLEASANT NEWS,38
IV.ROBBERY AND DESERTION,53
V.A RUN ASHORE,64
VI.TAKEN PRISONER,80
VII.AN INTERESTING CONVERSATION,92
VIII.ESCAPE FROM THE SLAVE-SHIP,99
IX.AMONG THE NATIVES,107
X.FETICHMEN,120
XI.AN EXCITING JOURNEY,130
XII.IN THE INTERIOR,144
XIII.CAPTURED BY CANNIBALS,162
XIV.WORSE THAN DEATH,175
XV.ESCAPE AND RECAPTURE,200
XVI.FRIENDLY ARABS,217
XVII.A NATIVE COUNCIL,234
XVIII.PREPARATIONS FOR DEFENCE,245
XIX.A FIERCE FIGHT,257
XX.AT NYANGWE,268
XXI.DEPARTURE FOR THE COAST,287
XXII.SPEARING HIPPOPOTAMI,298
XXIII.TROUBLES WITH THE NATIVES,311
XXIV.ACROSS TANGANYIKA,321
XXV.DIFFICULTIES AND DANGERS,331
XXVI.A HAPPY ENDING,353

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List of Illustrations.

ON THE LOOK-OUT,Frontispiece
SURF-BOAT CAPSIZED,Vignette
FRANK’S INTERVIEW WITH MR. POYNTER,13
ISLAND OF TENERIFFE,39
ON THE COAST OF LIBERIA,45
A YOUNG DAHOMAN,77
HARARU’S VILLAGE,109
THROUGH THE JUNGLE,117
SURPRISED BY A PYTHON,123
AFRICAN SORCERER,127
ON THE OGOWAI RIVER,133
SLAVES ON THE BANK OF THE OGOWAI,139
AFRICAN CHIEF AND HIS COURT,145
KAREMA,151
FUMO ATTACKED BY A LEOPARD,167
PANIC OF THE BALABA,175
ASCENDING THE RAPIDS,189
SURMOUNTING THE FALLS OF THE OGOWAI,195
A SOKO HUNT,219
CROSSING THE RIVER,227
WARRIORS OF MONA MKULLA,237
HATIBU AND BILAL,269
BANKS OF THE LUABBA,275
GOING TO MARKET,279
NYANGWE MARKET,283
WIVES OF HATIBU AND BILAL,291
LAGOON NEAR LUAMA,299
ENCOUNTER WITH A CROCODILE,303
VILLAGE IN UKARANGA,335
A BUFFALO CHARGE,347
A FATAL ENCOUNTER,351
WAGOGO WAR-DANCE,355

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IN SAVAGE AFRICA.

CHAPTER I.
LEAVING SCHOOL.

In the year of our Lord 18—, I was delighted one morning by receiving aletter from my father, who was captain and owner of the brig Petrel,telling me that he had arrived safely at Bristol with a valuable cargo,and that both he and my brother Willie, who was second mate of thePetrel, were well. The letter went on to say that my father haddecided on taking me to sea with him, and had written to myschoolmaster, the Rev. Stephen Poynter of Clifton, to announce hisintention. The letter also said that in two days’ time Willie would cometo take me away from school, and that I was to have everything ready forstarting when he came. According to the custom of the school, I hadreceived my letter in the ten minutes which were given to us for a runin the playground before commencing our work after breakfast, and, asmay be imagined, I lost no time{10} in announcing its contents to myschool-fellows, considering myself a very fine and important fellow tohave finished my school days. The bell stopped short a description ofthe Petrel in which I was indulging, and we all had to hurry in andtake our places at prayers, and when they were finished, to commence ourordinary tasks. I took my place at my desk, and opened my books. I mustown, however, I did not think much of what they contained, and, undertheir cover, I tried to read over again my father’s letter which hadannounced the coming change in my life. I could not help thinking thatit was very wrong for the head-master to keep such an importantpersonage, as I had now in my own estimation become, sitting on a hardbench at a black desk to con over rules of arithmetic, and I keptlooking at the door of the class-room to see if old Abe the porter wouldnot come to summon me to the head-master’s presence.

Indeed, my inattention became so marked that twice the usher of the roomsaid, “Baldwin, if you don’t go on with your work I shall have to punishyou.” He was just on the point of leaving his seat to come over to me,when at last the door opened, and old Abe appeared, calling out, “MasterBaldwin, wanted in the head-master’s study.” Usually, such a summons wasthe reverse of pleasant, for it meant, as a rule, that the boy who wascalled out had to answer for some mischief, and he was loath to answerthe call. I, however, having a free conscience, jumped up at once;{11} andthe usher, who did not know of my approaching departure, said, “There,Baldwin, you’re wanted by the head-master. I suppose you have been up tosome mischief, and that anticipation of your punishment has caused youto be inattentive.”

I smiled to those of my comrades to whom I had shown my letter, and wentpast the usher with a sort of swaggering show of independence; and hevery rightly made me return to my seat and leave the room properly. Assoon as I left, old Abe led the way to the double doors which separatedMr. Poynter’s private residence from the schoolrooms, and of which onlyhe and the masters had the keys, and opened them, saying with a grin ashe did so,—

“He hasn’t chosen the cane yet; what is it you have been up to?”

“Nothing, Abe. I’m going to leave.”

“Going to leave are you, and the holidays a month off yet! What is itfor?”

I somewhat resented old Abe’s familiarity, with whom the boys were onthe best of terms, and said in as dignified manner as I could, “I’mgoing to sea.”

“Going to sea, is it? Well, you’ll wish yourself back here before long.Going to sea! Salt beef and weevilly biscuit won’t suit as well as whatyou get to eat here.”

“I shan’t have salt beef and weevilly biscuit; I’m going in my father’sship the Petrel.”

“Well, I never heard of a ship yet where there was{12}n’t salt beef. Butnow the master mustn’t be kept waiting; just you hurry on to his study.”

I went along a passage on which the doors opened, and crossing the hall,knocked at Mr. Poynter’s study door. As soon as I had knocked I heardMr. Poynter say, “Come in;” and, opening the door, I found him sittingin his arm-chair, with my father’s letter in his hand. He motioned to meto sit down in a chair opposite to him, and said,—

“Frank, my boy, you know why I have sent for you, as your father tellsme he has written to you that you are to leave us in a couple of days.Now, this will be a great change in your life; and although I think thatmost boys should stop at school till they are at least eighteen, you arenow old enough to commence the life of a sailor. You are sixteen, areyou not?”

“Yes, sir; I was sixteen two months ago.”

“I have little to say about the temptations to which you will beexposed, for as you will be under your father’s own eye, you will beshielded from many which usually assail the young; but remember alwaysthat, even if you are tempted to do what is wrong by the thought thatyour earthly father will know nothing about it, your heavenly Father’seye is all-seeing, and that no thought or deed can escape him. For thefive years you have been here you have given me satisfaction; but still,I have seen symptoms of self-will, and an inclination not always to obeywith readiness. Remember that in a sailor instant and prompt obedience{13}

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FRANK’S INTERVIEW WITH MR. POYNTER.

Page 12.

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is absolutely necessary, as you will soon learn; and he who cannot obeywill never be fit to command. As to your studies, your father willdoubtless look after your navigation; and I will write to him and tellhim what other subjects will, in my opinion, best repay your continuedattention. Now I do not suppose you can pay much attention to your work,so you may tell Mr. Stone that as you are going to leave us so soon, Ihave excused you from further attendance in the school-room, and you maygather all your things together, in readiness for packing up.”

“Thank you, sir,” I said; and then, nerved to boldness by the kindnessof Mr. Poynter’s manner, I begged that he would grant my comrades aholiday.

“That’s a big request, Baldwin. You must remember that they are not allgoing to sea, and have to fit themselves by study for their futurecallings; besides, in three weeks the examination takes place, and theywant every moment to prepare themselves, so that they may do credit tothe school before the examiners.”

“Yes, sir; but if I leave in two days I shall not be able to play in thecricket-match between the first eleven and the next fifteen, while ifyou gave us a holiday to-morrow we could play then.”

“That is, no doubt, a most important matter in your mind, but it is notso important to me. However, I will think about it. Now I have lots todo, so you must run away.{16}

I left the study rather slowly, and was almost about to urge my requestagain, when Mr. Poynter said, “Remember obedience;” and I at once sawthat the ultimate granting of the holiday would depend on my beingpromptly obedient, and left without saying another word.

Old Abe was by the double doors to let me back into the school, and Isaid,—

“All right, old Abe; there are no more lessons for me.”

He looked at me and smiled, and answered,—

“No more lessons! why, my poor lad, you will find that all this life isone long lesson. You will have many

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