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A Cruise in the Sky or, The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl

A Cruise in the Sky
or, The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl
Category:
Title: A Cruise in the Sky or, The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl
Release Date: 2018-09-10
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 18
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The Aeroplane Boys Series


A Cruise In The Sky

OR

The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl


The Aeroplane Boys Series

By ASHTON LAMAR

  • I  IN THE CLOUDS FOR UNCLE SAM
    Or, Morey Marshall of the Signal Corps.
  • II  THE STOLEN AEROPLANE
    Or, How Bud Wilson Made Good.
  • III  THE AEROPLANE EXPRESS
    Or, The Boy Aeronaut’s Grit.
  • IV  THE BOY AERONAUTS’ CLUB
    Or, Flying For Fun.
  • V  A CRUISE IN THE SKY
    Or, The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl.
  • VI  BATTLING THE BIG HORN
    Or, The Aeroplane in the Rockies.

OTHER TITLES TO FOLLOW

These stories are the newest and most up-to-date. All aeroplane detailsare correct. Fully illustrated. Colored frontispiece. Cloth, 12mos.

Price, 60 cents each.


The Airship Boys Series

By H. L. SAYLER

  • I  THE AIRSHIP BOYS
    Or, The Quest of the Aztec Treasure.
  • II  THE AIRSHIP BOYS ADRIFT
    Or, Saved by an Aeroplane.
  • III  THE AIRSHIP BOYS DUE NORTH
    Or, By Balloon to the Pole.
  • IV  THE AIRSHIP BOYS IN THE BARREN LANDS
    Or, The Secret of the White Eskimos.
  • V  THE AIRSHIP BOYS IN FINANCE
    Or, The Flight of the Flying Cow.
  • VI  THE AIRSHIP BOYS’ OCEAN FLYER
    Or, New York to London in Twelve Hours.

These thrilling stories deal with the wonderful new science of aerialnavigation. Every boy will be interested and instructed by readingthem. Illustrated. Cloth binding. Price, $1.00 each.

The above books are sold everywhere or will be sentpostpaid on receipt of price by the

Publishers   The Reilly & Britton Co.   Chicago

Complete catalog sent, postpaid on request



A
Cruise In The Sky

OR

The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl

BY

ASHTON LAMAR

The AEROPLANE BOYS SERIES

Illustrated by S. H. Riesenberg

Chicago

The Reilly & Britton Co.

Publishers


COPYRIGHT 1911

by

THE REILLY & BRITTON CO.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A CRUISE IN THE SKY


CONTENTS

CHAP. PAGE
I A Florida Metropolis 9
II The Strange Work of a Wilderness Exile 20
III A Boat Without Sails, Screw or Oars 31
IV The Sequel of the Aero-Catamaran 41
V The Home of the Eccentric Experimenter 52
VI An Unfinished Letter Solves a Mystery 65
VII The Firm of Leighton & Anderson is Formed 75
VIII Andy First Hears of King Cajou 86
IX A New Idea in Aeroplanes 97
X Desperate Needs and a Bold Appeal 109
XI Roy Osborne Reaches Valkaria 121
XII The Pelican Makes Its First Flight 133
XIII Ba, the Bahaman, Talks at Last 145
XIV Andy Takes a Daring Chance 157
XV Timbado Key and Captain Monckton Bassett 171
XVI The Cannibal King and the Pink Pearl 186
XVII The Bird of Death 202

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

He took the tiller at times Frontispiece
“Nothing much doing!” 57
“Jump in,” said Andy 183
“Come, Bird of Death!” 209

[9]

A Cruise in the Sky

OR

The Legend of the Great Pink Pearl


CHAPTER I
A FLORIDA METROPOLIS

All afternoon the train had been followingthe picturesque shore of the Indian River, inFlorida. The snow and ice of the north hadlong since disappeared. Summer heat increasedas the train sped southward. Most of the seatsin the car were filled with tourists on theirway to Palm Beach. Two persons, both fromtheir looks and actions, were not destined tothat aristocratic winter resort.

In one of the sections were a woman and aboy. The latter, about sixteen years old, wasbegrimed with dust and smoke, but there was asnap in his eyes. In the fast gathering dusk,he sat, his nose mashed against the window andhis eyes shaded by his hands, as if anxious to[10]catch every detail of the strange land throughwhich the train was flying.

The woman glanced out of the window nowand then in a nervous manner, and, at last,when it was almost wholly dark and the porterhad begun to turn on the electric lights, shetouched the boy on the shoulder.

“Look at your watch again, Andrew. Wemust be almost there.”

As the boy drew out a watch (his father’s,lent to him as a safeguard on the long trip),his lips puckered.

“Twenty minutes!” he exclaimed, almost inalarm. “We’re due at Valkaria at 8:15. It’sfive minutes of eight now.”

“O, dear, I hope they won’t forget to stop,”said the woman, with increasing nervousness.“Hadn’t you better speak to the conductoragain? I don’t know what we’d do if we werecarried past our station.”

“I know,” answered the boy, with a laugh.“If they forgot us, they’d have to bring us backfor nothing. But the conductor won’t forget.I’ve pestered him so often about it that I guesshe’ll be glad to get rid of us.”

“I never thought about it being dark whenwe got there,” the woman went on, as the lights[11]in the car turned the outside world into blackness.“I suppose we’d better not try to openup your uncle’s house to-night.” She lookedout into the deep shadows of the palmettos.“We’ll go to a hotel or boarding houseto-night.”

“What’s the use?” argued the boy. “Thatis, unless you are too tired. It’ll be a uselessexpense. I’d like to find the house to-night, ifwe can. Someone can show us. Every one inthe town’ll know where Uncle Abner lived.”

“We must go to Captain Anderson first,” repliedthe woman at once. “He is the one whowrote to us of your uncle’s death, and sent thebody to us for burial. He has the key to thehouse, and he was your uncle’s friend.”

“Maybe their homes were near together,”suggested the boy hopefully. “I guess it isn’ta very big town, and it won’t be very late. Wecan go to a restaurant and get our supper andthen find Captain Anderson. He can take usright to the house to-night. It’ll be kind o’ likecampin’ out—”

“Camping out?” interrupted the woman. “Ihope not, although,” and she smiled faintly,“that would just suit you.”

The boy only laughed and again tried to makeout the landscape.

[12]

“Well,” he said at last, “even if it’s on themain street of Valkaria, it won’t be far to theriver, and that’ll be something.”

“What do you think it will be like?” askedthe woman as she gathered her bag and wrapstogether.

“I don’t care much,” replied the boy,dragging his suitcase from beneath the seat,“just so it isn’t too fancy—I don’t want tobe mowing lawns all the time, ’specially inJanuary.”

Just then there was the hoarse sound of thelocomotive whistle, and, almost with it, thegrinding of the quick set brakes. As the womanand the boy sprang to their feet, the train conductorhurried into the car and the portersprang forward to help with the baggage of theanxious travelers. As the other passengersaroused themselves in surprise at the unexpectedstop, the woman and the boy were hurriedto the platform and, the long train scarcelycoming to a stop, assisted precipitately from thecar.

Instead of landing upon a depot platform,the two suddenly disembarked passengers foundthemselves on a sandy incline, slipping slowlydownward into a dry ditch. They were conscious[13]that their bag, suitcase and wrapshad lodged somewhere near their feet. Scramblingto upright positions, they both turnedonly to see two fading green lights marking thefast disappearing Lake Worth express.

“Andrew!” exclaimed the woman, claspingthe boy’s arm.

“Looks like they’ve dumped us into nothin’,mother.”

“It’s gone!” the woman almost shouted.

“Gone?” repeated the boy. “You bet she’sgone, and gettin’ goner about a mile a minute.”

“What’ll we do?”

The boy laid his hands on his mother’s arms.

“Looks like a mistake. But don’t get scared.Let’s look about. If this is Valkaria, I reckonit must be the outskirts of the town.”

“The trunks,” cried the boy’s mother. “Andthey’ve taken our trunks. What are we to do?Something awful is sure to happen to us.”

“It hasn’t happened yet, mother. And I canbegin to see something. What’s this?”

On the far side of the ditch, a dark mass outlineditself in the night. While his mother protested,the boy clambered up the bank. Then apeal of boyish laughter sounded in the stillnight.

[14]

“It’s all right, mother. We’re right in town.This is the union depot. It’s an old box car.And here’s the sign on it—‘Valkaria.’”

There was a half hysterical sob, and the boyrushed back to his frightened parent.

“Don’t be scared, mother. It’s all right.This is the place. There’s bound to be someonenear. Brace up.”

Just then the hoarse croak of a frog sounded,and the woman broke into tears. The boy,attempting to pacify her, began another surveyof his surroundings.

“Look, mother. It’ll be moonlight in a littlewhile. See!”

As he pointed to the east, they could makeout the glowing rim of the full moon just silveringthe waxen tops of the encircling palmettos.Composing herself somewhat, the frightenedwoman allowed the boy to help her throughthe loose sand to the makeshift depot.

Along the front of it ran a rude, tramp-hackedbench. On this, the two seated themselves.The depot-car was doorless. As theboy observed this, he laughed again.

“Why, this isn’t bad, mother. We can sleepin here—”

“In there?” protested his mother. “There[15]are insects there, I know. I’m not going tomove from this bench till daylight. Then we’lltake the first train back to the north.”

“It may be our mistake, mother. Maybe Valkariaisn’t a town at all. I reckon it isn’t,judgin’ by the depot.”

“Why should they call an old car ‘Valkaria?’”exclaimed the woman. “Cars don’thave names. They have numbers.”

“I give it up,” answered the boy, with somecheerfulness. “But I don’t see that it’s so bad.The weather is fine. I’ll bet it’s dandy aroundhere in the daytime. That moon’s makin’things kind o’ great, now.”

“What’s that?” exclaimed the woman, suddenlycatching her son by the arm and pointingin the direction in which the train disappeared.“There! Across the railroad!”

The boy had seen it too. A broad, ribbon-likeband of chalky-white extended from the blackshadow of the palmettos on the left, crossed thetrack, and lost itself in the blackness beyond.As the boy looked he caught sight of similarthin strips along the track.

“It’s sand, mother. Looks like a ghost, butit’s white Florida sand. And I’ll bet it’s aroad. Let’s try it. If it’s a road, it goessomewhere.”

[16]

Anything was better than the black, noisomebox car. The boy made his way into the nowhalf illuminated ditch and collected the scatteredbaggage. Laden with it, the maroonedtravelers set forward. As the boy surmised,the white strip was a road. When they reachedit, they discovered, to their relief, safely lyingin the gully beyond the crossing, their twotrunks.

“Better get ’em out o’ the ditch, in case o’rain,” said the boy, and, despite his years, thewell-muscled lad tackled the job. It was not aneasy one, but, by rolling and sliding, the heavyparcels were soon landed on the edge of thesoft roadway. The moon was now shining sobrightly that the lad could make out

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