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Luncheons A Cook's Picture Book

Luncheons
A Cook's Picture Book
Category:
Author: Ronald Mary
Title: Luncheons A Cook's Picture Book
Release Date: 2018-09-13
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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I

LUNCHEONS


IIILUNCHEONS
A COOK’S PICTURE BOOK
A SUPPLEMENT TO THE
CENTURY COOK BOOK
BY
AUTHOR OF THE CENTURY COOK BOOK
ILLUSTRATED WITH OVER
TWO HUNDRED PHOTOGRAPHS
NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1902

IVCopyright, 1902, by
The Century Co.

Published October, 1902
THE DEVINNE PRESS

V

THE BOOK

This book is intended as a supplement to the “CenturyCook Book,” hence no general rules for cooking are given.

It is a book of illustrated receipts, a cook’s picture-book,intended to be very useful in the way of suggestion. It isarranged so that housekeepers may more readily make up amenu, often a difficult task, or may easily find new dishesto vary the routine of the daily fare.

Instead of various menus, which are impracticable becausethey seldom suit the convenience of the moment, listsof dishes are given which can be quickly read over and thosesuitable for the occasion selected. These lists are placed atthe heads of the sections, each section representing a singlecourse, and each list comprising a number of dishes, any oneof which is suitable for that course.

The receipts will meet the requirements of luncheons, butthe majority of them are equally appropriate for dinner.

Attention has been given to the garnishing and manner ofdishing, in order to make the dishes pleasing to the sight; forpretty dishes are attractive and recommend themselves, whilecarelessly served ones are sometimes refused on account oftheir appearance.

The illustrated dishes, though apparently elaborate, arein fact quite simple, the pastry-bag and tube, the use ofwhich is easily acquired, being the means employed to decoratemany of them.

The illustrations will serve as suggestions, and the taste ofthe cook will lead her to use such other combinations as aresuited to her convenience.


VII

CONTENTS

(Pages 1-34)
Luncheons Fontage Cups
Garnishing and Dishing Different Ways of Preparing Butter
The Pastry-bag Measures and Terms
Order of Courses  
(Pages 35-42)
  Fruits
First Course Oyster and Clam Cocktails
  Oysters and Clams on the Half Shell
  Canapés
(Pages 43-48)
Second Course Soups
(Pages 49-58)
Third Course Eggs
(Pages 59-68)
Fourth Course Shell-fish   Lobsters   Fish
(Pages 69-82)
Fifth or Seventh Course Entrées
(Pages 83-106)
  Meats
Sixth Course Vegetables and Cereals used as Vegetables
  Chicken
  Sauces for Meats   Sweet Sauces
(Pages 107-111)
Seventh Course Frozen Punches   Fruits   Cheese Dishes
(Pages 113-131)
Eighth Course Game   Salads   Cold Service   Cheese    Salad Dressings
(Pages 133-163)
Ninth Course Hot Desserts   Cold Desserts   Pies and Tarts
(Pages 165-171)
Tenth Course Ices
(Pages 173-176)
Eleventh Course Fruits
(Pages 177-195)
Loaf Cakes Small Fancy Cakes Icings
(Pages 197-211)
Breads
(Pages 213-223)

1LUNCHEONS

2ERRATA[1]
Page 20, line 16, for “gelatines” read “galantines.”
Illustration No. 10, 2, read “Purée Sieve”; 3, read “Fontage or Swedish timbale irons.”
Page 31, line 8, for “will rise and cover” read “will rise when put in the hot fat and cover.”
Page 47, last title, for “Creamed Soups” read “Cream Soups.”
Page 71, 4th line from bottom, for “usual” read “original.”
Page 71, 7th line from bottom, for “dilute it” read “diluted.”
Page 73, 2d line from bottom, for “flour” read “water.”
Page 91, 8th line from bottom, for “browned” read “brown.”
Page 119, for “Salads Nos. 6-7-8-9” read “Illustrations Nos. 94, 95, 96, 97.”
Page 135, line 3, for “and moisten” read “moistened.”
Page 143, 2d line from bottom, for “thick” read “whipped.”
Legend of illustration No. 134 read “Strawberry Charlotte No. 2.”
Legend of illustration No. 137 read “Chestnut Purée.”
Page 155, line 6, for “cupful” read “pound.”
Page 162, line 10, for “by placing” read “and.”
Page 168, 7th line from bottom, for “lemon” read “melon.”
Page 169, to receipt for Lemon Ice add, “1 quart of water.”
Page 170, line 4, for “cupful” read “quart.”
Page 175, after title, “Pineapple,” add “Illustration No. 158.”
Page 184, 5th line from bottom, for “icing” read “tracing.”
Page 189, 5th line from bottom, for “box with” read “box and serve with.”
Page 192, 9th line from bottom, for “coloring” read “covering.”
Page 199, 11th line from bottom, for “double its bulk” read “doubled in bulk.”
Page 201, 8th line from bottom, for “one quarter of an inch” read “one and a quarter inches.”

1.  Transcriber’s note: these Errata have been applied to this text. (2018-08-15)


3

CHAPTER I
 
LUNCHEONS

The midday meal, called luncheon, varies in characterfrom a very informal service, where the dishesare placed on the table and the servants leave theroom, to one of equal elaboration and formality withthat of a dinner. As this meal is made to conformto convenience, it is difficult to give general rules,as rules are conventions of ceremony, and ceremonyis sometimes disregarded, as in the case where alarger number of guests are received than the serviceof the house admits of entertaining in other thanan informal manner.

Luncheon proper corresponds to what in foreigncountries is called the second breakfast, or déjeûnerà la fourchette, where people are seated at the tableand served as at dinner. The French breakfast hour,however,

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