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A Class Room Logic Deductive and Inductive with Special Application to the Science and Art of Teaching

A Class Room Logic
Deductive and Inductive with Special Application to the
Science and Art of Teaching
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Title: A Class Room Logic Deductive and Inductive with Special Application to the Science and Art of Teaching
Release Date: 2018-09-16
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Book Cover

A CLASS ROOM LOGIC

DEDUCTIVE AND INDUCTIVE
WITH SPECIAL APPLICATION TO
THE SCIENCE AND ART OF TEACHING
BY
GEORGE HASTINGS McNAIR, PH. D.
HEAD OF DEPARTMENT OF LOGIC AND MATHEMATICS, CITY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. JAMAICA. NEW YORK CITY
THE ETHLAS PRESS
FIVE NORTH BROADWAY. NYACK. NEW YORK
COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY
GEORGE HASTINGS MCNAIR
To
MY WIFE.

Transcriber’s Notes

The cover image was provided by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.

Punctuation has been standardized.

Most abbreviations have been expanded in tool-tips for screen-readers and may be seen by hovering the mouse over the abbreviation.

The under bracket in the original text has been replaced by a standard underline.

This book was written in a period when many words had not become standardized in their spelling. Words may have multiple spelling variations or inconsistent hyphenation in the text. These have been left unchanged unless indicated with a Transcriber’s Note.

Index references have not been checked for accuracy.

Footnotes are identified in the text with a superscript number and have been accumulated in a table at the end of the text.

Transcriber’s Notes are used when making corrections to the text or to provide additional information for the modern reader. These notes have been accumulated in a table at the end of the book and are identified in the text by a dotted underline and may be seen in a tool-tip by hovering the mouse over the underline.

PREFACE.

This treatise is an outgrowth of our class room work in logic.

It has been published in the hope of removing some of the difficulties which handicap the average student.

We trust that the language is simple and definite and that the illustrative exercises and diagrams may be helpful in making clear some of the more abstruse topics.

If a speedy review for examination is necessary, it is recommended that the briefer course as outlined on page 493 be followed and that the summaries closing each chapter be carefully read.

Only the fundamentals of deductive and inductive logic have received attention. Moreover emphasis has been given to those phases which appear to commend themselves because of their practical value.

Further than this we trust that the book may fulfill in some small way the larger mission of inspiring better thinking and, in consequence, of leading to a more serviceable citizenship.

Surely as civilization advances it is with the expectation of giving greater significance to the assumption “that man is a rational animal.”

I am indebted to a number of writers on logic, notably to Mill, Lotze, Keynes, Hibben, Fowler, Aikins, Hyslop, Creighton and Jevons. I am likewise under obligation to that large body of students who, by frankly revealing their difficulties, have given me a different point of view.

For constructive criticism and definite encouragement I owe a personal debt of gratitude to Prof. Charles Gray Shaw of New York University, to Prof. Frank D. Blodgett of the Oneonta Normal School and to Prin. A. C. MacLachlan of the Jamaica Training School for Teachers.

G. H. McN.

City Training School for Teachers,
Jamaica, N. Y. City.
October 3, 1914.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1.—THE SCOPE AND NATURE OF LOGIC.
1. The Mind.
2. Logic Related to Other Subjects.
3. Logic Defined.
4. The Value of Logic to the Student.
5. Outline.
6. Summary.
7. Review Questions.
8. Questions for Original Thought and Investigation
CHAPTER 2.—THOUGHT AND ITS OPERATION.
1. The Knowing Mind Compared with the Thinking Mind.
2. Knowing by Intuition.
3. The Thinking Process.
4. Notions, Individual and General.
5. Knowledge and Idea as Related to the Notion.
6. The Logic of the Psychological Terms Involved in the Notion.
7. Thought in the Sensation and Percept.
8. Evolution and the Thinking Mind.
9. The Concept as a Thought Product.
10. The Judgment as a Thought Product.
11. Inference as a Thought Product.
12. Thinking and Apprehension.
13. Stages in Thinking.
14. Outline.
15. Summary.
16. Review Questions.
17. Questions for Original Thought and Investigation.
CHAPTER 3.—THE PRIMARY LAWS
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