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The Boy's Hakluyt English Voyages of Adventure and Discovery

The Boy's Hakluyt
English Voyages of Adventure and Discovery
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Title: The Boy's Hakluyt English Voyages of Adventure and Discovery
Release Date: 2018-09-17
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Transcriber’s Note:

Full page images have been moved slightly to the nearest paragraphbreak. They were not included in the pagination of the original.

Minor errors, attributable to the printer, have been corrected. Pleasesee the transcriber’s note at the end of this textfor details regarding the handling of any textual issues encounteredduring its preparation.

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THE BOY’S HAKLUYT

IN THE SAME SERIES
Published by CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS

The Boy’s Catlin. My Life Among the Indians, byGeorge Catlin. Edited by Mary Gay Humphreys.Illustrated. 12mo

net $1.50

The Boy’s Hakluyt. English Voyages of Adventureand Discovery, retold from Hakluyt by Edwin M.Bacon. Illustrated. 12mo

net $1.50

The Boy’s Drake. Edited by Edwin M. Bacon.

(In Preparation)

QUEEN ELIZABETH GOING ABOARD THE “GOLDEN HIND.”
From a painting by Frank Brangwyn.

THE
BOY’S HAKLUYT
ENGLISH VOYAGES OF
ADVENTURE AND DISCOVERY

BY
EDWIN M. BACON,
AUTHOR OF “HISTORIC PILGRIMAGES IN NEW ENGLAND,”
“LITERARY PILGRIMAGES IN NEW ENGLAND,” “THE CONNECTICUT RIVER
AND THE VALLEY OF THE CONNECTICUT,” ETC.
ILLUSTRATED
NEW YORK
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS
1910
Copyright 1908, 1909, by
CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS

Published September, 1908
logos
v

PREFACE

This account of Richard Hakluyt and his narratives ofEnglish exploration and adventure, from the earliest recordsto the establishment of the English colonies in North America,has been prepared at the instance of Edwin D. Mead, the finemainspring of the far-reaching system of historical study widelyknown as the “Old South Work,” for the instruction of youngfolk, by engaging methods, in genuine American history. Thepurpose of the book was to draw the youth of to-day to asource of American history of first importance, and a work ofeternal interest and value.

To this end I have sought to utilize the huge foolscapvolumes of the Principal Navigations and to summarize orcompress the narratives into a coherent story from the earliestadventures chiefly for conquest to those for discovery and expansionof trade, and finally for colonization, down to the settlementof Virginia. The American note is dominant throughoutthis animated story of daring, pluck, courage, genuineheroism, and splendid nerve displayed by the English captainsof adventure and discovery North, East, and West.

I have endeavored also to recall Hakluyt’s significant workin his publications which preceded the Principal Navigations,and in his equally important personal efforts to forward Americancolonization by England, in order to re-present him in histrue position, recognized by the earlier historians—that of avifounder hand in hand with Raleigh of the English colonies,out of which developed the national life of the United States.

The dictum of William Robertson in his eighteenth centuryHistory of America (1777), that to Hakluyt England was moreindebted for her American possessions “than to any other manof that age,” was sustained by Sir Clements Robert Markham,the English traveller, geographer, and historian, upon the occasion,in 1896, of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of theHakluyt Society, of which Sir Clements was then the president,when he said: “Virtually Raleigh and Hakluyt were the foundersof those colonies which eventually formed the United States.As Americans revere the name of Walter Raleigh, they shouldgive an equal place to Richard Hakluyt.”

Sir Clements further observed: “Excepting, of course,Shakspere and the Dii Majores, there is no man of the age ofElizabeth to whom posterity owes a deeper debt of gratitudethan to Richard Hakluyt, the saviour of the records of ourexplorers and discoverers by land and sea.”

Americans may well claim the pride of inheritance in thesebrave annals of adventure on untried seas and to unknownlands. Hakluyt’s quaint language ought not to be a hard nutto crack for the American boy when such rich meat is within.

E. M. B.
vii

CONTENTS

CHAPTER   PAGE
 
I. Beginnings of America 1
II. Richard Hakluyt the Man 17
III. The Principal Navigations 32
IV. The Early Voyages 36
V. Quest for the Northwest Passage 53
VI. The Voyages of the Cabots 62
VII. The English Claim to America 77
VIII. Ventures in the Cabots’ Track 90
IX. The Northeast Passage 96
X. The Opening of Russia 104
XI. Voyages for the Muscovy Company 124
XII. Revival of the Northwest Theory 143
XIII. Frobisher in Arctic America 150
XIV. The Lust for Gold 176
XV. Hawkins in Florida 197
XVI. Drake’s Great Exploits 227
XVII. On the Pacific Coast 253
viiiXVIII. Gilbert’s Voyages 285
XIX. Footprints of Colonization 308
XX. Virginia 322
XXI. Raleigh’s Lost Colony 351
XXII. Jamestown 381

ILLUSTRATIONS

Queen Elizabeth Going Aboard the “Golden Hind”  
  From a painting by Frank Brangwyn. Frontispiece
    FACING
    PAGE
 
Fac-simile of Title-page of “Divers Voyages” 10
  From the copy in the New York Public Library (Lenox Building).  
 
Fac-simile of Title-page of the Third, or American, Volume of Hakluyt’s “Voyages,” Edition of 1598–1600 32
  From a copy of the original edition in the New York Public Library (Lenox Building).  
 
“The Great Harry,” an English Ship of the Fifteenth Century 50
 
Kidder’s Sketch-map of John Cabot’s Voyage in 1497 69
 
King Henry VIII 94
  From a photograph, copyrighted by Walker and Boutall, of a painting.  
 
Sebastian Cabot at About Eighty Years of Age 136
  Reproduced from the engraving in Seyer’s "History of Bristol," published in 1823. The original painting was attributed to Holbein and was destroyed by fire in 1845.  
 
Martin Frobisher 144
 
Queen Elizabeth 180
 
ixSir John Hawkins 198
 
Sir Francis Drake 228
 
Drake Overhauling a Spanish Galleon 268
 
Sir Walter Raleigh at the Age of Thirty-four 310
  From a photograph, copyrighted by Walker and Cockerell, of the portrait attributed to Federigo Zaccaro in the National Portrait Gallery.  
 
The Arrival of the Englishmen in Virginia 324
  From a drawing by John White, of Raleigh’s first colony, 1585.  
 
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