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The Boston School Atlas Embracing a compenium of geography

The Boston School Atlas
Embracing a compenium of geography
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Title: The Boston School Atlas Embracing a compenium of geography
Release Date: 2018-09-24
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Book Cover.

THE BOSTON
SCHOOL ATLAS,

EMBRACING
A COMPENDIUM OF GEOGRAPHY.


BY B. FRANKLIN EDMANDS.


Table of Contents.

PREFACE.  
ELEMENTAL GEOGRAPHY.  3
EXPLANATION OF MAPS.  5
GRAND DIVISIONS OF THE EARTH. 17
CIVIL AND POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. 17
STATE OF SOCIETY. 18
NORTH AMERICA. 21
UNITED STATES. 25
MAINE. 26
NEW HAMPSHIRE.... and ... VERMONT. 31
MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, AND RHODE ISLAND. 32
NEW YORK. 37
PENNSYLVANIA, MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, AND DELAWARE. 38
WESTERN STATES. 43
UNITED STATES. 44
SOUTH AMERICA. 57
EUROPE. 61
BRITISH ISLES. 65
ASIA. 69
AFRICA. 73
GENERAL QUESTIONS. 74
WEST INDIA ISLANDS. 75
OCEANICA. 75
ELEMENTAL ASTRONOMY. 76
TIDES. 77
QUESTIONS IN REVIEW OF THE COMPENDIUM. 78

TWELFTH EDITION; STEREOTYPED,

CONTAINING THE FOLLOWING MAPS AND CHARTS.

1. MAP OF THE WORLD.
2. CHART ... MOUNTAINS.
3. CHART ... RIVERS.
4. NORTH AMERICA.
5. UNITED STATES.
6. PART OF MAINE.
7. VERMONT & N. HAMPSHIRE.
8. MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, AND R. ISLAND.
9. NEW YORK.
10. PENN. MD., N. JER. AND DEL.
11. WESTERN STATES.
12. CHART ... CANALS, RAIL ROADS.
13. CHART ... POLITICAL AND STATISTICAL.
14. SOUTH AMERICA.
15. EUROPE.
16. BRITISH ISLES.
17. ASIA.
18. AFRICA.

Embellished with Instructive Engravings.

BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY ROBERT S. DAVIS,

SUCCESSOR TO LINCOLN, EDMANDS, & CO.,
No. 77, Washington Street.


1840.


PREFACE.


A careful examination of Maps is a sure and at the same time the mostconvenient method of acquiring a knowledge of Geography. With a viewof furnishing to young classes an economical means of commencing acourse of geographical study, this work has been prepared; and it isbelieved that a thorough acquaintance with its contents will impartsuch general ideas, as will prepare them to enter upon a more minuteinvestigation of the subject, when they shall have arrived at a proper age.

The use of this work will also obviate the necessity which hasheretofore existed, of furnishing such classes with larger volumes, thegreater part of which is useless to them, till the book is literallyworn out; and although it is adapted to young students, it will befound that the Atlas exercises are equally proper for more advanced pupils.

The study of this work should commence with recitations of shortlessons previously explained by the instructer; and after the pupilsare well versed in the elements, the study of the maps should becommenced. Embodied with the questions on the maps will be occasionallyfound questions in italic, referring to the elements. These areintended as a review, and the pupils should be made to understand, thatthrough the whole of the maps, the instructer will require a similarreview of the Geography. This course cannot fail to be interesting andadvantageous.

The elements of Astronomy are annexed to the work; and it is leftto the discretion of the instructer to determine the proper time tointroduce this pleasing study to his pupils.

BOSTON, AUGUST, 1830.


ADVERTISEMENT TO THE SIXTH (STEREOTYPE) EDITION.


The universal approbation and liberal patronage bestowed upon theformer editions of the Boston School Atlas, have induced the publishersto make in this edition numerous improvements. The maps have allbeen re-engraved on steel, and in pursuance of hints from severalinstructers, a concise compendium of descriptive Geography has beenadded, while at the same time the text of the preceding edition hasnot been so altered as to cause confusion in the use of the twoeditions in the same class. Many engravings calculated to instruct,rather than merely to amuse, have been interspersed, to render thebook more attractive and useful to pupils. The work, in addition tobeing stereotyped, has been kept as much as possible free from subjectsliable to changes, in order that it may be a permanent Geography,which may hereafter be used without the inconvenience of variations indifferent reprints.

THE INDUCTIVE SYSTEM has deservedly become the most popular methodof imparting instruction to the youthful mind, and may be used withas much advantage in the study of Geography as of any other science.To compile treatises of Geography on this plan, with the necessaryarrangement of the maps adapted to every place, would multiply themindefinitely. The Inductive System, however, can be used with advantagein the study of this book by pursuing the following course. Let theInstructer describe to the pupils the town in which they reside, andrequire them to become familiar with its boundaries, rivers, ponds,hills, &c. After this is accomplished, the map of the State should belaid before them, and the situation of the town should be pointed out,and they should be told what a State is, and what towns are nearestthem, &c. This plan can be carried to any extent the instructer maythink necessary to enable his pupils to acquire a correct knowledge oftheir own State; and, if necessary, he should write for them additionalquestions of a local nature, beside those contained in the work. If thetown be not on the map, it should be inserted with a pen on all themaps used in the class. After the pupils shall have acquired a correctidea of their own State, they may be taught respecting the adjoiningStates, countries, &c. and the plan may be pursued as successfully asif they possessed an Atlas with maps arranged in particular referenceto their own place of residence.

BOSTON, JUNE 17, 1833.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1832, by Lincolnand Edmands, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of theDistrict of Massachusetts.


RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE
BOSTON SCHOOL ATLAS.


From R. G. Parker, Author of “Progressive Exercisesin English Composition,” and other popular works.

I have examined a copy of the Boston School Atlas, and have nohesitation in recommending it as the best introduction to the study ofGeography that I have seen. The compiler has displayed much judgmentin what he has omitted, as well as what he has selected; and hasthereby presented to the public a neat manual of the elements of thescience, unencumbered with useless matter and uninteresting detail. Themechanical execution of the work is neat and creditable, and I doubtnot that its merits will shortly introduce it to general use.

Respectfully yours,  
R. G. PARKER.

From E. Bailey, Principal of the Young Ladies’ High School, Boston.

I was so well pleased with the plan and execution of the Boston SchoolAtlas, that I introduced it into my school, soon after the firstedition was published. I regard it as the best work for beginners inthe study of Geography which has yet fallen under my observation; assuch I would recommend it to the notice of parents and teachers.

Very respectfully,  
E. BAILEY.

From the Preceptors of Leicester Academy.

Among the great variety of school-books which have recently beenpublished, few are in our opinion more valuable than the Boston SchoolAtlas. As an introduction to the study of Geography, it is preferableto any work of the kind with which we are acquainted.

JOHN RICHARDSON,
ALBERT SPOONER.  

From the Principal of New Ipswich (N. H.) Academy.

I have with much pleasure examined the copy of the Boston School Atlas,which you politely sent to me. I think it admirably well calculatedto excite in the young mind a love of the study of Geography, and toconvey correct ideas of the rudiments of that science. I shall be happyto recommend it wherever I have opportunity. It is, in my opinion, thevery thing that is needed in our primary schools.

Respectfully yours,  

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