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Caliban by the Yellow Sands A Community Masque of the Art of the Theatre

Caliban by the Yellow Sands
A Community Masque of the Art of the Theatre
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Title: Caliban by the Yellow Sands A Community Masque of the Art of the Theatre
Release Date: 2018-10-11
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Book Cover.

  • WORKS BY PERCY MACKAYE
  • DRAMAS
  • The Canterbury Pilgrims. A Comedy.
  • Jeanne d’Arc. A Tragedy.
  • Sappho and Phaon. A Tragedy.
  • Fenris The Wolf. A Tragedy.
  • A Garland to Sylvia. A Dramatic Reverie.
  • The Scarecrow. A Tragedy of the Ludicrous.
  • Yankee Fantasies. Five One-act Plays.
  • Mater. An American Study in Comedy.
  • Anti-matrimony. A Satirical Comedy.
  • To-morrow. A Play in Three Acts.
  • A Thousand Years Ago. A Romance of the Orient.
  • The Immigrants. A Lyric Drama.
  • MASQUES
  • Caliban. A Shakespeare Masque.
  • Saint Louis. A Civic Masque.
  • Sanctuary. A Bird Masque.
  • The New Citizenship. A Civic Ritual.
  • POEMS
  • The Sistine Eve, and Other Poems.
  • Uriel, and Other Poems.
  • Lincoln. A Centenary Ode.
  • The Present Hour.
  • Poems and Plays. In Two Volumes.
  • ESSAYS
  • The Playhouse and the Play.
  • The Civic Theatre.
  • A Substitute for War.
  • AT ALL BOOKSELLERS
  • Uniform with this volume
  • SAINT LOUIS: A Civic Masque
  • AS ENACTED BY 7,000 CITIZENS OF SAINT LOUIS

CALIBAN


PRELIMINARY SKETCH OF SETEBOS, BY JOSEPH URBAN


CALIBAN
BY THE YELLOW SANDS

BY
Percy MacKaye

Garden City New York
DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY
1916

ENDORSED BY THE DRAMA LEAGUE OF AMERICA


Copyright, 1916, by
Percy MacKaye

All rights reserved, including that of
translation into foreign languages,
including the Scandinavian

All acting rights, and motion picture rights, are reserved
by the author in the United States, Great Britain
and countries of the copyright Union

SPECIAL NOTICE
Regarding Public Performances and Readings

No performance of this Masque—professional oramateur—and no public reading of it may be given without thewritten permission of the author and the payment of royalty.

The author should be addressed in care of the publishers.

During the Shakespeare Tercentenary season of 1916, theMasque—after its New York production at the City CollegeStadium, May 23, 24, 25, 26, 27—will be available for productionelsewhere, on a modified scale of stage performance.

With proper organization and direction, amateur participants maytake part in performances with or without the Interludes.

For particulars concerning performances wholly amateur, addressMiss Clara Fitch, Secretary Shakespeare Tercentenary Committee, 736Marquette Building, Chicago, Ill.

After June first, a professional company, which will coöperatewith local communities, will take the Masque on tour. For particularsaddress Miss A. M. Houston, Drama League of America, 736 MarquetteBuilding, Chicago, Ill.


Come unto these yellow sands,And then take hands!The Tempest.

CALIBAN

BY THE YELLOW SANDS

A COMMUNITY MASQUE
Of the Art of the Theatre

Devised and Written to Commemorate the
Tercentenary of the Death of
SHAKESPEARE

Illustrations by
Joseph Urban & Robert Edmond Jones

TO · THE · ONLIE
BEGETTER · OF · THE · BEST
IN · THESE · INSUING
SCENES · MASTER · W · S


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND CHARTS

Cover Design: “When the kings of earth clasp hands”
  (Act II, Second Inner Scene).
  By Robert Edmond Jones.
 
Preliminary Sketch of Setebos.
  By Joseph Urban
Frontispiece
  facing page
Ground Plan for Auditorium (with Stages
  of Masque Proper and Interludes).
  By Joseph Urban
xxx
Design of Stage for Masque Proper.
  By Joseph Urban
xxxii
Preliminary Sketch for Seventh Inner Scene.
  By Robert Edmond Jones
98
Preliminary Sketch for Tenth Inner Scene.
  By Robert Edmond Jones
138
APPENDIX
Inner Structure of Masque (Chart).
  By Percy MacKaye
154
A Community Masque Audience (Photograph).
  By E. O. Thalinger
156
Community Masque Organization Plan (Chart).
  By Hazel MacKaye
158

CONTENTS

page
Preface xiii
Masque Structure xxix
Persons and Presences    xxxi
Prologue  3
First Interlude 32
Act I 34
Second Interlude 76
Act II 78
Third Interlude 110
Act III 111
Epilogue 142
Appendix 147

[Pg xiii]

PREFACE

Three hundred years alive on the 23rd of April, 1916, the memory ofShakespeare calls creatively upon a self-destroying world to do himhonor by honoring that world-constructive art of which he is a masterarchitect.

Over seas, the choral hymns of cannon acclaim his death; inbattle-trenches artists are turned subtly ingenious to inter his art;War, Lust, and Death are risen in power to restore the primeval reignof Setebos.

Here in America, where the neighboring waters of his “vexed Bermoothes”lie more calm than those about his own native isle, here only is givensome practical opportunity for his uninterable spirit to create newsplendid symbols for peace through harmonious international expression.

As one means of serving such expression, and so, if possible, ofpaying tribute to that creative spirit in forms of his own art, I havedevised and written this Masque, at the invitation of the ShakespeareCelebration Committee of New York City.

The dramatic-symbolic motive of the Masque I have taken fromShakespeare’s own play “The Tempest,” Act I, Scene 2. There, speaking to Ariel, Prospero says:[Pg xiv]

“Hast thou forgotThe foul witch Sycorax, who with age and envyWas grown into a hoop? This damn’d witch Sycorax,For mischiefs manifold and sorceries terribleTo enter human hearing was hither brought with childAnd there was left by the sailors. Thou ...Wast then her servant;And, for thou wast a spirit too delicateTo act her earthly and abhorred commands,Refusing her grand hests, she did confine thee,By help of her most potent ministersAnd in her most unmitigable rage,Into a cloven pine, within which riftImprisoned thou didst painfully remain ...Then was this island—Save for the son that she did litter here,A freckled whelp hag-born—not honor’d withA human shape ... that CalibanWhom now I keep in service. Thou best know’stWhat torment I did find thee in, ... it was a tormentTo lay upon the damn’d.... It was mine art,When I arrived and heard thee, that made gapeThe pine and let thee out.”

“It was mine art”.... There—in Prospero’s words [andShakespeare’s]—is the text of this Masque.[Pg xv]

The art of Prospero I have conceived as the art of Shakespeare in itsuniversal scope: that many-visioned art of the theatre which, age afterage, has come to liberate the imprisoned imagination of mankind fromthe fetters of brute force and ignorance; that same art which, beingusurped or stifled by groping part-knowledge, prudery, or lust, hasbeen botched in its ideal aims and—like fire ill-handled or ill-hiddenby a passionate child—has wrought havoc, hypocrisy, and decadence.

Caliban, then, in this Masque, is that passionate child-curious part ofus all [whether as individuals or as races], grovelling close to hisaboriginal origins, yet groping up and staggering—with almost rhythmicfalls and back-slidings—toward that serener plane of pity and love,reason and disciplined will, where Miranda and Prospero commune withAriel and his Spirits.

In deference to the master-originator of these characters and theirnames, it is, I think, incumbent on me to point out that these fourcharacters, derived—but reimagined—from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest,”become, for the purposes of my Masque, the presiding symbolic DramatisPersonæ of a plot and conflict which are my own conception. They arethus no longer Shakespeare’s characters of “The Tempest,” though bornof them and bearing their names.

Their words [save for a very few song-snatches and sentences] and their[Pg xvi]actions are those which I have given them; the development of theircharacters accords with the theme—not of Shakespeare’s play but ofthis Masque, in which Caliban’s nature is developed to become theprotagonist of aspiring humanity, not simply its butt of shame andridicule.

My conception and treatment also of Setebos [whose name is but apassing reference in Shakespeare’s play], the fanged idol [substitutedby me for the “cloven pine”]; of Sycorax, as Setebos’ mate [in forma super-puppet, an earth-spirit rather than “witch”], from bothof whom Caliban has sprung; of the Shakespearian Inner Scenes,

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