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Miss Numè of Japan A Japanese-American Romance

Miss Numè of Japan
A Japanese-American Romance
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Title: Miss Numè of Japan A Japanese-American Romance
Release Date: 2018-11-18
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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MISS NUMÈ OF JAPAN.


illustration
ONOTO WATANNA

ONOTO WATANNA.


title page

MISS NUMÈ
OF JAPAN

A Japanese-American Romance

BY

ONOTO WATANNA

Author of "Natsu-San," "Yuri-San and Okiku-San,"
"A Half Caste," etc.

Decoration

Chicago and New York:
RAND, McNALLY & COMPANY.
PUBLISHERS.


Copyright, 1899, by Rand, McNally & Co.


THIS BOOK
IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED TO MY FRIEND,
HELEN M. BOWEN
BECAUSE I LOVE HER SO


INTRODUCTION.


The fate of an introduction to a book seems not only to fall short ofits purpose, but to offend those whose habit it is to criticise beforethey read. Once I heard an old man say, "It is dangerous to write forthe wise. They strike warm hands with form, but shrug a cold shoulder atoriginality." I do not think, though, that this book was written for the"wise," for the men and women whose frosty judgment would freeze thewarm current of a free and almost careless soul. It was written for theimaginative, and they alone are the true lovers of story and song. OnotoWatanna plays upon an instrument new to our ears, quaintly Japanese, anair at times simple and sweet, as tender as the chirrup of a bird inlove, and then as wild as the scream of a hawk. Mood has been herteacher; impulse has dictated her style. She has inherited the spirit ofthe orchard in bloom. Her art is the grace of the wild vine, under noobligation to a gardener, but with a charm that the gardener could notimpart. A monogram wrought by nature's accident upon the golden leaf ofautumn, does not belong to the world of letters, but it inspires morefeeling and more poetry than a library squeezed out of man's tiredbrain. And this book is not unlike an autumn leaf blown from a forest in Japan.

OPIE READ.

Chicago, January, 1899.


[Pg 1]

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER. PAGE.
I.— Parental Ambitions, 5
II.— Cleo, 10
III.— Who Can Analyze a Coquette? 15
IV.— The Dance on Deck, 20
V.— Her Gentle Enemy, 24
VI.— A Veiled Hint, 27
VII.— Jealousy Without Love, 30
VIII.— The Man She Did Love, 37
IX.— Merely a Woman, 43
X.— Watching the Night, 47
XI.— At the Journey's End, 52
XII.— Those Queer Japanese! 54
XIII.— Takashima's Home-Coming, 59
XIV.— After Eight Years, 60
XV.— Numè, 64
XVI.— An American Classic, 68
XVII.— "Still a Child," 73
XVIII.— The Meeting, 76
XIX.— Confidences, 79
XX.— Sinclair's Indifference, 83
XXI.— "Me? I Lig' You," 86
XXII.— Advice, 92
XXIII.— Afraid to Answer, 95
XXIV.— Visiting the Tea Houses, 99
XXV.— Shattered Hopes, 104
XXVI.— Conscience, 108
XXVII.— Confession, 110
XXVIII.— Japanese Pride, 115
XXIX.— Seclusion, 117
XXX.— Feminine Diplomacy, 121
[Pg 2]XXXI.— A Barbarian Dinner, 124
XXXII.— The Philosophy of Love, 126
XXXIII.— What Can that "Luf" Be? 130
XXXIV.— Conspirators, 133
XXXV.— A Respite for Sinclair, 136
XXXVI.— Those Bad Jinrikisha Men, 139
XXXVII.— Those Good Jinrikisha Men, 141
XXXVIII.— Disproving a Proverb, 144
XXXIX.— Love! 148
XL.— A Passionate Declaration, 152
XLI.— A Hard Subject to Handle, 156
XLII.— A Story, 160
XLIII.— The Truth of the Proverb, 163
XLIV.— Numè Breaks Down, 167
XLV.— Trying to Forget, 171
XLVI.— An Observant Husband, 173
XLVII.— Matsushima Bay, 176
XLVIII.— A Rejected Lover, 180
XLIX.— The Answer, 184
L.— The Ball, 187
LI.— The Fearful News, 190
LII.— The Tragedy, 192
LIII.— A Little Heroine, 194
LIV.— Sinclair Learns the Truth at Last, 198
LV.— Lovers Again, 202
LVI.— The Penalty, 206
LVII.— The Pity of It All, 211
LVIII.— Mrs. Davis's Nerves, 214
LIX.— Cleo and Numè, 217

[Pg 3]

ILLUSTRATIONS.


TITLE. PAGE.
Onoto Watanna, Frontispiece
Numè-San, 29
Koto, Kirishima, and Matsu, 101
Playing Karutta, 117
"Numè Breaks Down," 165
Koto Would Not Marry, 181
Sitting Together Hand in Hand, 197
Numè and Her Two Friends Koto and Matsu, 205

[Pg 5]

Miss Numè of Japan.

Decoration

CHAPTER I. PARENTAL AMBITIONS.

When Orito, son of Takashima Sachi, was but ten years of age, and Numè,daughter of Watanabe Omi, a tiny girl of three, their fathers talkedquite seriously of betrothing them to each other, for they had beengreat friends for many years, and it was the dearest wish of their livesto see their children united in marriage. They were very wealthy men,and the father of Orito was ambitious that his son should have anunusually good education, so that when Orito was seventeen years of age,he had left the public school of Tokyo and was attending the ImperialUniversity. About this time, and when Orito was at home on a vacation,there came to the little town where they lived, and which was only avery short distance from Tokyo, certain foreigners from the West, whorented land from Sachi and became neighbors to him and to Omi.

Sachi had always taken a great deal of interest in these foreigners,many of whom he had met quite often while on business in Tokyo, and hewas very[Pg 6] much pleased with his new tenants, who, in spite of theirbarbarous manners and dress, seemed good-natured and friendly. Often inthe evening he and Omi would walk through the valley to their neighbors'house, and listen to them very attentively while they told them of theirhome in America, which they said was the greatest country in the world.After a time the strange men went away, though neither Sachi nor Omiforgot them, and very often they talked of them and of their foreignhome. One day Sachi said very seriously to his friend:

"Omi, these strangers told us much of their strange land, and talked ofthe fine schools there, where all manner of learning is taught. What sayyou that I do send my

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