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A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume I (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume I (of 2)
With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters
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Author: Moore John
Title: A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume I (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters
Release Date: 2018-12-22
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, A View of Society and Manners in France,Switzerland, and Germany, Volume I (of 2), by John Moore

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Title: A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume I (of 2)

With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

Author: John Moore

Release Date: December 22, 2018 [eBook #58516]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

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A
VIEW
OF
SOCIETY and MANNERS
IN
FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, AND GERMANY:

WITH
ANECDOTES relating to some EMINENT CHARACTERS.

BY JOHN MOORE, M.D.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

Strenua nos exercet inertia: navibus atque
Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis, hic est.
Hor.

The FOURTH EDITION, Corrected.

LONDON:
Printed for W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, in the Strand,
MDCCLXXXI.


ADVERTISEMENT.

From a diffidence of his own abilities,and from other motives not so wellfounded, the Author of the following Lettersthought it expedient, in the first edition,to throw a slight veil over the real situationin which they were written: he imaginedalso, that by this means some reflections,particularly those on gaming, might be introducedmore naturally, and with a strongereffect. But having been assured by those ofwhose friendship and judgment he is equallyconvinced, that the assumed characterand feigned situation in the two first lettersgave an air of fiction to the real incidentsin the rest of the work, he has now restoredthose two letters to their original form.


Just Published,

Written by the same Author,

A VIEW of SOCIETY and MANNERSin ITALY: With Anecdotes relatingto some Eminent Characters.2 Vols. 8vo. Price 14s.


[i]

TO HIS GRACE
DOUGLAS,
Duke of Hamilton and Brandon,Marquis of Douglas, &c.

MY LORD DUKE,

Although established practicemight, on this occasion, justifymy holding a language to your Gracewhich I never before used, yet youhave nothing of that kind to fear;it is as inconsistent with my dispositionto offer adulation, as it is contraryto yours to desire it.—Nor does[ii]this address proceed from a vain beliefthat the lustre of your name willdispose the Public to wink at the blemishesof my performance. Thehighest titles do not screen even thoseto whom they belong from contempt,when their personal characters arecontemptible; far less can they shelterthe dulness or folly of others.

I am prompted to offer this View ofSociety and Manners to your Grace, bysentiments of the most sincere esteemand attachment; and, exclusive of allconsiderations of that nature, it is presentedwith peculiar propriety to you,as no other person has had equal opportunitiesof knowing how far theobjects it comprehends are just, andfaithfully drawn from nature.

[iii]

Some perhaps may imagine, that Ishould have displayed more prudencein offering this work to a less competentjudge; but I am encouragedin my desire of prefixing your Nameto these imperfect sketches, by thefond persuasion that nobody can bemore inclined to afford them the indulgenceof which I am sensible theystand in so much need.

I have the honour to be, with themost respectful and cordial regard,

Your Grace’s

Most obedient, and obliged Servant,

THE AUTHOR.

[iv]


[v]

CONTENTS
OF THE
FIRST VOLUME.

LETTER I. p. 1.
LETTER II. p. 11.
Plan of conduct while abroad.—Agree to correspond by letter.—Servants.—Masters.
LETTER III. p. 18.
Marquis de F——.—Colisée.—Characters.
[vi]LETTER IV. p. 26.
French manners.
LETTER V. p. 33.
Paris.—London.—French opinions.—Marquis de F—— and Lord M——.
LETTER VI. p. 38.
Loyalty, English, German, Turkish, French.—Le Roi.—Princes of the blood.—Ideas of government.
LETTER VII. p. 48.
Sentiments of Frenchmen concerning the British constitution.
LETTER VIII. p. 54.
French Kings have peculiar reasons to love their subjects.—The three sons of Catherine[vii] of Medicis.—Henry IV.—Natural effects of exertion and of sloth on the body, understanding, heart.
LETTER IX. p. 63.
A French lover.
LETTER X. p. 68.
Groundless accusations.—Friendship.—English travellers.
LETTER XI. p. 76.
English prejudices.—Conversation with Mr. B——.—Reflections.
LETTER XII. p. 86.
Tragedy of Siege of Calais.—Bon mot of Duc d’Ayen.—Russia—Prussia.—France.—Statue of Lewis XV.—Epigrams.
[viii]LETTER XIII. p. 95.
Chevalier B—— and his lady.—Madame de M——, her character;—her misfortune.
LETTER XIV. p. 103.
Condition of the common people in France.—Unwillingness to censure the King.—French parliaments.—Lawyers indiscriminately ridiculed on the French stage.—Opposition in England.
LETTER XV. p. 113.
Dubois and Fanchon.
LETTER XVI. p. 126.
Mankind do not always act from motives of self-interest.—A fine gentleman and a pine-apple.—Supper at the Marquis de F——’s.—Generosity of Mr. B——.—Men who calculate.—Men who do not.
[ix]LETTER XVII. p. 137.
Different taste of French and English with respect to tragedy.—Le Kain.—Garrick.—French comedy.—Comedie Italienne, Carlin.—Repartée of Le Kain.
LETTER XVIII. p. 150.
Pleasure and business.—Lyons.—Geneva.
LETTER XIX. p. 157.
Situation of Geneva.—Manners.—Government.—The clergy.—Peculiar customs.—Circles.—Amusements.
LETTER XX. p. 168.
English families at Cologny.—Le jour de l’Escalade.—Military establishment.—Political squabbles.—Sentiments of an Englishman.—Of a gentleman of Geneva.
[x]LETTER XXI. p. 178.
King of Arquebusiers.—A Procession.—A Battle.
LETTER XXII. p. 187.
A Feast.
LETTER XXIII. p. 193.
The garrison and fortifications of Geneva not useless.—Standing armies in other countries.—The freedom and independence of Geneva of service to the King of Sardinia.
LETTER XXIV. p. 201.
Journey to the Glaciers of Savoy.—Mole.—Cluse.—The Rhone and the Arve.—Sallenche.—Mules.—A church.—Conversation with a young peasant in the valley of Chamouni.
[xi]LETTER XXV. p. 214.
Mountanvert.—The Chamois.—Mount Breven.—Mont Blanc.—The Needles.—The Valley of Ice.—Avalanches.
LETTER XXVI. p. 228.
Account of Glaciers continued.—Theories.
LETTER XXVII. p. 236.
Idiots.—The sentiments of an old Soldier.—Guatres.—Journey from Chamouni to the Pays de Vallais.—Martigny.—Sion.
LETTER XXVIII. p. 247.
Road to St. Maurice.—Reflections on the situation of the Pays de Vallais.—Bex.—Aigle.—St. Gingo.—Meillerie.—Evian.—Repaille.
[xii]LETTER XXIX. p. 261.
Voltaire.
LETTER XXX. p. 273.
Voltaire.
LETTER
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