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Stage-coach and Mail in Days of Yore, Volume 2 (of 2) A picturesque history of the coaching age

Stage-coach and Mail in Days of Yore, Volume 2 (of 2)
A picturesque history of the coaching age
Title: Stage-coach and Mail in Days of Yore, Volume 2 (of 2) A picturesque history of the coaching age
Release Date: 2019-01-11
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 67
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Cover

STAGE-COACH
AND MAIL IN
DAYS OF YORE

MAIL-COACH PASSING ST. GEORGE’S CIRCUS, SOUTHWARK, 1797.
After Dalgety

STAGE-COACH
AND MAIL IN
DAYS OF YORE

A PICTURESQUE HISTORY
OF THE COACHING AGE

VOL. II

By CHARLES G. HARPER

Illustrated from Old-Time Prints
and Pictures

London:
CHAPMAN & HALL, Limited
1903

All rights reserved


PRINTED BY
HAZELL, WATSON AND VINEY, LD.,
LONDON AND AYLESBURY.


vii

CONTENTS

CHAPTER   PAGE
I. The Later Mails 1
II. Down the Road in Days of Yore. I.—A Journey from Newcastle-on-Tyne to London in 1772 48
III. Down the Road in Days of Yore. II.—From London to Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1830 66
IV. Accidents 96
V. A Great Carrying Firm: The Story of Pickford and Co. 123
VI. Robbery and Adventure 144
VII. Snow and Floods 159
VIII. The Golden Age, 1824–1848 173
IX. Coach-proprietors 194
X. Coach-proprietors (continued) 226
XI. The Amateurs 239
XII. End of the Coaching Age 260
XIII. What Became of the Coachmen 292
XIV. The Old England of Coaching Days 322

ix


List of Illustrations

SEPARATE PLATES

    PAGE
1. Mail-coach passing St. George’s Circus, Southwark, 1797. (After Dalgety) Frontispiece
2. The Worcester Mail, 1805. (After J. A. Atkinson) 7
3. The Mail. (After J. L. Agasse, 1842) 13
4. The Bristol Mail at Hyde Park Corner, 1838. (After J. Doyle) 19
5. The Yarmouth Mail at the “Coach and Horses,” Ilford. (After J. Pollard) 25
6. The “Quicksilver” Devonport Mail, passing Kew Bridge. (After J. Pollard) 29
7. The “Quicksilver” Devonport Mail, arriving at Temple Bar. (After C. B. Newhouse) 37
8. The “Quicksilver” Devonport Mail, passing Windsor Castle. (After Charles Hunt, 1840) 41
9. Mail-coach built by Waude, 1830. (Now in possession of Messrs. Holland & Holland) 45
10. The “Queen’s Hotel” and General Post Office. (After T. Allom) 69
11. The Turnpike Gate. (From a contemporary Lithograph) 77
12. A Midnight Disaster on a Cross Road: Five Miles to the Nearest Village. (After C. B. Newhouse) 99
13. The “Beaufort” Brighton Coach. (After W. J. Shayer) 103
14. A Queer Piece of Ground in a Fog: “If we get over the rails, we shall be in an ugly fix.” (After C. B. Newhouse) 111x
15. Road versus Rail. (After C. Cooper Henderson, 1845) 117
16. Joseph Baxendale. (From the Portrait by E. H. Pickersgill, R.A.) 131
17. Pickford and Co’s Royal Fly-van, about 1820. (From a contemporary Painting) 139
18. The Lioness attacking the Exeter Mail, October 20th, 1816. (After A. Sauerweid) 153
19. Winter: Going North. (After H. Alken) 163
20. Mail-coach in a Snow-drift. (After J. Pollard) 167
21. Mail-coach in a Flood. (After J. Pollard) 171
22. Late for the Mail. (After C. Cooper Henderson, 1848) 183
23. The Short Stage. (After J. Pollard) 191
24. William Chaplin. (From the Painting by Frederick Newnham) 197
25. The Canterbury and Dover Coach, 1830. (After G. S. Treguar) 201
26. James Nunn, Horse-buyer and Veterinary Surgeon to William Chaplin. (After J. F. Herring) 205
27. William Augustus Chaplin. 211
28. The “Bedford Times,” one of the last Coaches to run, leaving the “Swan Hotel,” Bedford. 219
29. Four-in-hand. (After G. H. Laporte) 243
30. Sir St. Vincent Cotton. 249
31. The Consequence of being Drove by a Gentleman. (After H. Alken) 255
32. Goldsworthy Gurney’s London and Bath Steam-carriage, 1833. (After G. Morton) 265
33. The Last Journey down the Road. (After J. L. Agasse) 275
34. The Chesham Coach, 1796. (From the Painting by Cordery) 283xi
35. The Last of the “Manchester Defiance.” (From a Lithograph) 287
36. The Coachman, 1832. (After H. Alken) 293
37. The Driver, 1852. (After H. Alken) 297
38. The Guard, 1832. (After H. Alken) 303
39. The Guard, 1852. (After H. Alken) 309
40. “All Right!”—The Bath Mail taking up the Mail-bags. (From a contemporary Lithograph) 341

ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT

Vignette (Title-page)
List of Illustrations ix
Stage-coach and Mail in Days of Yore 1
Mail-coach Halfpenny issued by William Waterhouse 196
Benjamin Worthy Horne 221
“A View of the Telegraph”: Dick Vaughan, of the Cambridge “Telegraph.” (From an Etching by Robert Dighton, 1809) 301
A Stage-coachman’s Epitaph at Haddiscoe 316

1

Stage Coach and Mail in Days of Yore

STAGE COACH AND MAILIN DAYS OF YORE

CHAPTER I
THE LATER MAILS

The Bristol Mail opened the mail-coach era bygoing at eight miles an hour, but that was analtogether exceptional speed, and the averagemail-coach journeys were not performed at arate of more than seven miles an hour until longafter the nineteenth century had dawned. In1812, when Colonel Hawker travelled to Glasgow,it took the mail

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