» » A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2)
With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters
Category:
Author: Moore John
Title: A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters
Release Date: 2019-01-19
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 37
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 29

The Project Gutenberg eBook, A View of Society and Manners in France,Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2), by John Moore

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United Statesand most other parts of the world at no cost and with almost norestrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use itunder the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with thiseBook or online at www.gutenberg.org. If you are notlocated in the United States, you'll have to check the laws of thecountry where you are located before using this ebook.

Title: A View of Society and Manners in France, Switzerland, and Germany, Volume II (of 2)

With Anecdotes Relating to Some Eminent Characters

Author: John Moore

Release Date: January 19, 2019 [eBook #58731]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A VIEW OF SOCIETY AND MANNERS IN FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, AND GERMANY, VOLUME II (OF 2)***

 

E-text prepared by the Online Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net)
from page images generously made available by
Internet Archive
(https://archive.org)

 

Note:
Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive. See https://archive.org/details/viewofsocietyman02moor_0

Project Gutenberg has the other volume of this work.
Volume I: see http://www.gutenberg.org/files/58516/58516-h/58516-h.htm

 


 

[i]

[ii]

[iii]

A
VIEW
OF
SOCIETY and MANNERS
IN
FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, AND GERMANY:

WITH
ANECDOTES relating to some EMINENT CHARACTERS.

BY JOHN MOORE, M.D.

VOL. II.

Strenua nos exercet inertia: navibus atque
Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis, hic est.
Hor.

The FOURTH EDITION, Corrected.

LONDON:
Printed for W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, in the Strand,
MDCCLXXXI.

[iv]


[v]

CONTENTS
OF THE
SECOND VOLUME.

LETTER L. p. 1.
Conversation with a foreigner concerning the English nation.
LETTER LI. p. 17.
Inns at Frankfort.—Table d’hôte.—French.—English.—German women.[vi]
LETTER LII. p. 25.
Collections of paintings.—Cabinets of natural curiosities.—Contrast of character between the French and Germans, illustrated by their postillions.
LETTER LIII. p. 33.
Court of Cassel.
LETTER LIV. p. 41.
The Landgrave.—His troops.—The officers.—A brilliant action by Marechal Laudohn.—French comedy.—Courtiers.
LETTER LV. p. 51.
City of Cassel.—Palaces.—Academy.—Colonade.—Noble cascade at Wasenstein.[vii]
LETTER LVI. p. 61.
Journey from Cassel to Brunswic by Gottingen.—The reigning Duke of Brunswic Wolfenbuttle.—The Duchess.—Duke Ferdinand.—The Hereditary Prince and Princess.—Prince Leopold and his sister.—Duke Ferdinand’s villa.
LETTER LVII. p. 70.
The town of Brunswic.—Saved by Prince Frederic.—Academy at Brunswic.—Wolfenbuttle.—Saltzdahlen.—Mr. de Westphalen.
LETTER LVIII. p. 80.
German nobility fond of masquerades.—Etiquette.—Prince Leopold goes to Vienna, which awakens his mother’s grief for the death of his brothers.[viii]
LETTER LIX. p. 87.
Zell.—The Queen of Denmark.—Benevolent conduct of the Princess of Brunswic.—Hanover.—The troops.—The military ardour of a corpulent general officer.—Hernhausen.
LETTER LX. p. 97.
The violent passion for literature of a court lady at Brunswic.—-Field Marechal Sporken.—George II.
LETTER LXI. p. 107.
Death of the Queen of Denmark.—Magdeburg.—Brandenburg.
LETTER LXII. p. 116.
Potsdam.—Troops in private houses, not in barracks.—The palace.—The King’s study.—His wardrobe.—The ruling passion of the late King.[ix]
LETTER LXIII. p. 128.
Sans-Souci.—The collection of pictures.—The King’s taste criticized by a connoisseur.—The new palace.
LETTER LXIV. p. 133.
Reviews at Berlin.
LETTER LXV. p. 143.
Prussian discipline.
LETTER LXVI. p. 150.
Prussian troops remain in the same garrisons.—The effect of the discipline on the characters of the officers, and of the men.—Reflections.
LETTER LXVII. p. 159.
Sentiments of a Prussian officer on discipline.—Story of an English sailor.[x]
LETTER LXVIII. p. 169.
Berlin.
LETTER LXIX. p. 178.
The Queen’s court.—French manners prevail at Berlin.—Matrimonial felicity.
LETTER LXX. p. 187.
Freedom of discourse at Berlin.—Some touches of the King’s character.—Licentious manners.
LETTER LXXI. p. 193.
The licence of the press.
LETTER LXXII. p. 204.
King of Prussia’s œconomy.—Taxes.—The army.—Singular motives for a murder.—An execution.[xi]
LETTER LXXIII. p. 214.
Journey to Mecklenburg Strelitz.—The reigning Duke and his sister.—The Duchy of Mecklenburg.—Preparations for entertainments at Sans-Souci.
LETTER LXXIV. p. 226.
Theatrical entertainments.—The tragedy of Oedipus.
LETTER LXXV. p. 235.
The King of Prussia.—His conversation with the D—— of H——.
LETTER LXXVI. p. 244.
The King of Prussia.
LETTER LXXVII. p. 257.
Lord Marechal.—The Hereditary Prince of Prussia.[xii]
LETTER LXXVIII. p. 266.
Difficulty of deserting from Prussian garrisons.—The King’s valet-de-chambre.
LETTER LXXIX. p. 273.
Manufactory of porcelain at Berlin.—Journey to Dresden.—Electoral court.—Museum.—Gallery of pictures.
LETTER LXXX. p. 282.
Sufferings of Dresden during last war.—Saxon troops.
LETTER LXXXI. p. 290.
Prague.—Piety of the inhabitants.—St. Nepomuc.—An Irish priest.—A popular commotion.
LETTER LXXXII. p. 300.
Vienna.—The court.[xiii]
LETTER LXXXIII. p. 310.
The Countess Thune.—Her character.—The advantages which the English may enjoy at Vienna.—Prince Kaunitz.
LETTER LXXXIV. p. 317.
A character.—Reflections on the English, French, and Germans.
LETTER LXXXV. p. 328.
An entertainment on the top of Mount Calenberg.—A convent of Monks.—Spiritual gallantry.
LETTER LXXXVI. p. 335.
Manners.—A lady’s distress.—An indulgent husband.
LETTER LXXXVII. p. 342.
Presburg.—A Hungarian villa.[xiv]
LETTER LXXXVIII. p. 350.
The palace and gardens of Estherhasie.—The Hungarians.
LETTER LXXXIX. p. 359.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 29
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net