» » Improved Queen-Rearing or, How to Rear Large, Prolific, Long-Lived Queen Bees The Result of Nearly Half a Century's Experience in Rearing Queen Bees, Giving the Practical, Every-day Work of the Queen-Rearing Apiary

Improved Queen-Rearing or, How to Rear Large, Prolific, Long-Lived Queen Bees The Result of Nearly Half a Century's Experience in Rearing Queen Bees, Giving the Practical, Every-day Work of the Queen-Rearing Apiary

Improved Queen-Rearing
or, How to Rear Large, Prolific, Long-Lived Queen Bees The
Result of Nearly Half a Century's Experience in Rearing
Queen Bees, Giving the Practical, Every-day Work of the
Queen-Rearing Apiary
Category:
Author: Alley Henry
Title: Improved Queen-Rearing or, How to Rear Large, Prolific, Long-Lived Queen Bees The Result of Nearly Half a Century's Experience in Rearing Queen Bees, Giving the Practical, Every-day Work of the Queen-Rearing Apiary
Release Date: 2019-02-08
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 48
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Transcriber’s Note:

The cover image was created by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.

_Yours truly Henry Alley_

IMPROVED QUEEN-REARING
 
OR
 
HOW TO REAR LARGE, PROLIFIC, LONG-LIVED QUEEN BEES
 
The Result of Nearly Half a Century’s Experience in Rearing Queen Bees, Giving the Practical, Every-day Work of the Queen-Rearing Apiary

BY HENRY ALLEY
Apiarist
ILLUSTRATED
Printed for the Author
By Chas. A. King, Beverly, Massachusetts
COPYRIGHT BY THE AUTHOR
1903
Winter Case Brood-chamber

Improved Bay State closed-end frame Bee-Hive. Used by thousands of Bee-Keepers many years with great success. Construction of brood-frames same as the Dawzeubaker. Frames are reversible and held in position by side boards and two iron rods.

PREFACE

This little book is written and designed to instructthose engaged in bee-keeping in the art of rearingqueen bees. The long experience of the author inthis particular branch of apiculture, as herein detailed,may prove not only instructive but interesting. Thatthe work may meet the approbation of its readers is thewish of

THE AUTHOR
Winter Case Brood-chamber

Illustration of the original Bay State Bee-Hive. Invented and used by Henry Alley, more than twenty years ago. This hive was specially devised for wintering bees successfully on summer stands and for the production of the largest amount of honey.

CONTENTS

Page
 
Breeding queen, where to keep 16
 
Cell building, how to prepare a colony for 18
 
Cell building, method number one 19
 
Cell building, method number two 26
 
Cell building, method number three 29
 
Cell building, feeding while going on 29
 
Cell building, how to prepare eggs for 21
 
Cell building, destroying eggs 22
 
Cell building, theory of using young bees 24
 
Cell building, how to rear the best 27
 
Drones, objectionable 37
 
Drones, how to catch and destroy 37
 
Drones, how to obtain and preserve 44
 
Drone-trap, utility of 46
 
Honey, how to prevent candying 54
 
Nuclei, how to form 31
 
Nuclei, how to feed 44
 
Pipe for burning tobacco 41
 
Queen-cell frame, description of 38
 
Queen-cells, transferring 40
 
Queens, how to care for 49
 
Queens, age at which they mate 49
 
Queens, virgin, forcing to mate 50
 
Queens, age at which they lay 51
 
Queens, to know fertile from unfertile 50
 
Queens, fertilizing in confinement 51
 
Queens, respect bees show them 51
 
Queen-cells, destroying 51
 
Queens, comparative size 53
 
Queen-rearing, first improvements 11
 
Queen-rearing, latest improved methods 12
 
Queen-rearing, on a large scale 14
 
Queen-rearing, proper conditions of apiary 15
 
Queen-rearing, to prepare eggs for 16
 
Queen-breeding colony, how to start 19
 
Queen-breeding hive, how to make 17
 
Queens, fertile, how to introduce 34
 
Queens, unfertile, how to introduce 35
 
Queen nursery, how to use 29
 
Queenless bees, necessity of 28
IMPROVED QUEEN-REARING
OR
How to Rear Large, Prolific and Long-Lived Queen Bees
9

INTRODUCTION

In the year 1857 I had very little knowledge of apiculture,yet I had seen bees in hives apparently working, “makinghoney” as it was called in those days by all who keptbees; had heard all the talk about the “king bee,” andhad seen hives draped in mourning when a member of the bee-keepers’family died. I had also seen the bee-keeper and hisfamily out in the apiary pounding upon tin pans, ringing thedinner bell, and raising a hub-bub generally when a colony hadcast a swarm. Then I had seen bees “carry wax” on their legs,etc., etc.

Well, I did not require very much experience with bees tofind out that all the above performances were indulged in only byignorant and superstitious bee-keepers. With all the literaturewe now have concerning apiculture, some bee-keepers may befound who know no more about bees than those who kept them50 years ago.

In the month of July, 1857, I found a fine swarm of beeshanging upon a limb of a tree in my garden. The bees were hivedin a small packing box, and at once commenced to build comband store honey. When fall came the box was well filled withbees and stores, and the colony went into winter quarters in finecondition, and came out in the spring strong in numbers, provingto be a first-class colony in all respects.

In the spring of 1858, I purchased another colony which wasin a box-hive that had a 7 × 9 glass in the back side through whichI watched the bees many hours. Well do I remember the greatinterest I took in bees at that time. One day while watching the10bees through the glass, I saw the queen pass around one of thecombs, and had really seen the great “king bee.” Before winterset in, I had not only seen other queen bees but had actuallyreared a few. Then I got an idea that I had learned all therewas to know about bees and queen rearing. But this little bit ofegotism was dispelled by each year’s experience, and I soon foundthat there was much to learn about bee-keeping. And now, aftermy long experience in queen rearing, I find that no one can livelong enough to learn all there is to know about the subject of beesand apiculture generally. Surely no one can learn the art of beekeeping in one year as many bee-keepers of the present day claim.

Well, at the end of one year’s experience, I was seized with adesire to go into queen rearing extensively. By this time I hadlearned that every colony of bees had a queen and that droneswere male bees; and also found out hundreds of things aboutbees that I never before had known. I had discovered that whena colony of bees was deprived of its queen it would at once commenceto construct queen cells, and rear several young queens.

Rearing queens was so fascinating that I soon began to rearthem in great numbers, in fact I had them growing at all timesduring the warm months. Of course this was only for amusementas no bee-keepers were in want of queens, nor was there any demandfor them. Well, I continued to advance in the art and enlargemy experience, not only in rearing queens, but in bee-keepinggenerally. About this time I found a man who had also been“stricken” with the bee fever and he had as much experiencewith bees as myself, and had reared queens merely to exhibit at acattle fair held in his town and only three miles from my place.This man had made a frame about twelve inches square, to whichglass was fastened on both sides, thus forming a one comb observationhive. A small piece of brood comb containing eggs andlarvae was fastened at the top of the frame by strings, and the bees,of which there were about a pint, were actually building queencells. Thousands of interested people were watching the beeswhile at work, and many of the people were asking all sorts ofquestions about queens, bees and honey. My first queens werereared in about the same way as above described.

In the year 1860 I practiced queen rearing on a larger scale,as we had then heard about Mr. Langstroth and his wonderfulbook and still more wonderful hive, which is today more marvelousthan anything else connected with apiculture. From this timeon rapid advancement was made not only in queen rearing but in11all branches of bee culture. We soon went from box-hives tomovable-comb hives. About this time the famous Italian beescame in, and then queen-rearing was carried on in earnest; notfor amusement but queens were reared by the thousand for sale.At first they were sent by express in small one-comb boxes, thenby mail to all parts of the United States; later on queens went bymail to all parts of

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net