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Medical Inquiries and Observations, Vol. IV (of 4) The Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by the Author

Medical Inquiries and Observations, Vol. IV (of 4)
The Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by the Author
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Title: Medical Inquiries and Observations, Vol. IV (of 4) The Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by the Author
Release Date: 2019-02-28
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Title: Medical Inquiries and Observations, Vol. IV (of 4)

The Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged by the Author

Author: Benjamin Rush

Release Date: February 28, 2019 [eBook #58862]

Language: English

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MEDICAL INQUIRIES
AND
OBSERVATIONS.

BY BENJAMIN RUSH, M. D.
PROFESSOR OF THE INSTITUTES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE,AND OF CLINICAL PRACTICE, IN THE UNIVERSITYOF PENNSYLVANIA.
IN FOUR VOLUMES.
VOL. IV.
THE SECOND EDITION,
REVISED AND ENLARGED BY THE AUTHOR.

PHILADELPHIA,
PUBLISHED BY J. CONRAD & CO. CHESNUT-STREET, PHILADELPHIA;M. & J. CONRAD & CO. MARKET-STREET, BALTIMORE; RAPIN,CONRAD, & CO. WASHINGTON; SOMERVELL & CONRAD, PETERSBURG;AND BONSAL, CONRAD, & CO. NORFOLK.
PRINTED BY T. & G. PALMER, 116, HIGH-STREET.
1805.

[iii]


CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV.

  page
An account of the bilious yellow fever, as it appeared in Philadelphia in 1797 1
An account of the bilious yellow fever, as it appeared in Philadelphia in 1798 63
An account of the bilious yellow fever, as it appeared in Philadelphia in 1799 89
An account of sporadic cases of yellow fever, as they appeared in Philadelphia in 1800 101
An account of sporadic cases of yellow fever, as they appeared in Philadelphia in 1801 109
An account of the measles, as they appeared in Philadelphia in 1801 115
An account of the yellow fever, as it appeared in 1802 121
An account of the yellow fever, as it appeared in 1803 131
An account of sporadic cases of yellow fever, as they appeared in 1804 145
An account of the yellow fever, as it appeared in 1805 151
An inquiry into the various sources of the usual formsof the summer and autumnal disease in the UnitedStates, and the means of preventing them 161[iv]
Facts, intended to prove the yellow fever not to be contagious 221
Defence of blood-letting, as a remedy in certain diseases 273
An inquiry into the comparative states of medicine inPhiladelphia, between the years 1760 and 1766, and 1805 363

[1]

AN ACCOUNT
OF THE
BILIOUS REMITTING AND INTERMITTING
YELLOW FEVER.
AS IT
APPEARED IN PHILADELPHIA,
IN 1797.

[3]

The winter of 1797 was in general healthy.During the spring, which was cold and wet, nodiseases of any consequence occurred. The springvegetables were late in coming to maturity, andthere were every where in the neighbourhood ofPhiladelphia scanty crops of hay. In June andJuly there fell but little rain. Dysenteries, choleras,scarlatina, and mumps, appeared in the suburbsin the latter month. On the 8th of July Ivisited Mr. Frisk, and on the 25th of the samemonth I visited Mr. Charles Burrel in the yellowfever, in consultation with Dr. Physick. Theyboth recovered by the use of plentiful depletingremedies.

The weather from the 2d to the 9th of Augustwas rainy. On the 1st of this month I was called[4]to visit Mr. Nathaniel Lewis, in a malignant biliousfever. On the 3d I visited Mr. Elisha Hall, withthe same disease. He had been ill several days beforeI saw him. Both these gentlemen died on the6th of the month. They were both very yellowafter death. Mr. Hall had a black vomiting onthe day he died.

The news of the death of these two citizens,with unequivocal symptoms of yellow fever, exciteda general alarm in the city. Attempts weremade to trace it to importation, but a little investigationsoon proved that it was derived from thefoul air of a ship which had just arrived from Marseilles,and which discharged her cargo at Pinestreetwharf, near the stores occupied by Mr. Lewisand Mr. Hall. Many other persons about thesame time were affected with the fever from thesame cause, in Water and Penn-streets. Aboutthe middle of the month, a ship from Hamburghcommunicated the disease, by means of her foul air,to the village of Kensington. It prevailed, moreover,in many instances in the suburbs, and inKensington, from putrid exhalations from guttersand marshy grounds, at a distance from the Delaware,and from the foul ships which have beenmentioned. Proofs of the truth of each of theseassertions were afterwards laid before the public.

[5]

The disease was confined chiefly to the districtof Southwark and the village of Kensington, forseveral weeks. In September and October, manycases occurred in the city, but most of them wereeasily traced to the above sources.

The following account of the weather, duringthe months of August, September, and Octoberwas obtained from Mr. Thomas Pryor. It is differentfrom the weather in 1793. It is of consequenceto attend to this fact, inasmuch as it showsthat an inflammatory constitution of the atmospherecan exist under different circumstances of the weather.It likewise accounts for the variety in thesymptoms of the fever in different years and countries.Such is the influence of season and climateupon the symptoms of this fever, that it led Dr.M'Kitterick to suppose that the yellow fever ofCharleston, so accurately described by Dr. Lining,in the second volume of the Physical and LiteraryEssays of Edinburgh, was a different disease fromthe yellow fever of the West-Indies[1].

[6]

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS,
MADE IN PHILADELPHIA.
AUGUST, 1797.

D. Ther. Barom. Winds and Weather.
  1 73 75 30 0 S. E. E. Rain in the forenoon and afternoon.
  2 72 76 30 0 N. E. by E. Cloudy, with rain in the afternoon and night. Wind E. by N.
  3 72 78 30 6 E. ½ N. Rain in the morning, and all day and night.
  4 72 78 30 4 E. Rain hard all day and at night.
  5 74 79 29 84 Wind light, S. W. Cloudy. Rain this morning. The air extremely damp; wind shifted to N. W. This evening heavy showers, with thunder.
  6 73 76 30 86 W. N. W. Cloudy.
  7 70 76 30 4 N. W. Close day. Rain in the evening and all night. Wind to E.
  8 72 76 29 95 E. Rain this morning.
  9 72 76 29 86 S. W. Cloudy morning.
10 69 73 30 16 N. W. Clear.
11 70 74 30 25 N. W. Clear. Rain all night.
12 71 74 30 5 S. W. Cloudy. Rain in the morning. Cloudy all day. Rain at night.
13 73 75 29 87 S. W. Cloudy. Rain all day.
14 70 74 29 9 N. W. Clear fine morning.
15 56 60 30 15 N. W. Clear fine morning.
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