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A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume I (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters

A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume I (of 2)
With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters
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Title: A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume I (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters
Release Date: 2019-02-17
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Transcriber’s Note: Evident printing errors have been changed, butotherwise the original (and antiquated) spelling has been preserved,in both English and other languages. The errata have been corrected.

[i]

A
VIEW
OF
SOCIETY and MANNERS
IN
ITALY:

WITH
ANECDOTES relating to some EMINENT CHARACTERS.

BY JOHN MOORE, M. D.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

Strenua nos exercet inertia: navibus atque
Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis, hic est.
Hor.

THE SECOND EDITION.

LONDON:
Printed for W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, in the Strand.
MDCCLXXXI.

[ii]


[iii]

ADVERTISEMENT.

The following observations on Italy,and on Italian manners, occurred inthe course of the same Tour in which thosecontained in a book lately published, entitledA View of Society and Manners inFrance, Switzerland, and Germany, weremade. All who have read that book willperceive, at first sight, that the presentwork is a continuation of the former; butto those who have not, it was thoughtnecessary to account for the abrupt mannerin which the following Letters begin.

Clarges-street,
December 14, 1780.


[iv]

Just Published,

A NEW EDITION OF

A VIEW of SOCIETY and MANNERSin FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, andGERMANY; with Anecdotes relatingto some Eminent Characters.In Two Volumes. Price 10s. in Boards.


[v]

CONTENTS
OF THE
FIRST VOLUME.

LETTER I. p. 1.
Journey from Vienna to Venice.
LETTER II. p. 20.
The arsenal.—The Bucentaur.—Doge’s marriage.
LETTER III. p. 27.
The island of Murano.—Glass manufactory.—Mr. Montague.
[vi]LETTER IV. p. 39.
Situation of Venice.—Lagune.—Canals.—Bridges.
LETTER V. p. 46.
Piazza di St. Marco.—Patriarchal church.—Ducal palace.—Broglio.
LETTER VI. p. 56.
Reflections excited by the various objects around St. Mark’s square.—On painting.—A connoisseur.
LETTER VII. p. 69.
Origin of Venice.
LETTER VIII. p. 77.
Various changes in the form of government.—Tyrannical conduct of a Doge.—Savage behaviour of the people.—Commerce of Venice.
[vii]LETTER IX. p. 89.
New regulations.—Foundation of the aristocracy.—Origin of the ceremony of espousing the Sea.—New forms of magistracy.
LETTER X. p. 104.
Henry Dandolo.
LETTER XI. p. 114.
New courts.—New magistrates.—Reformation of the Venetian code.—The form of electing the Doge.
LETTER XII. p. 129.
Aristocracy established.—Conspiracies.—Insurrections.—Ecclesiastical Inquisition.—The College, or Seigniory.
[viii]LETTER XIII. p. 144.
Conspiracy against the State, by a Doge.—Singular instance of weakness and vanity in a noble Venetian.—New magistrates to prevent luxury.—Courtesans.
LETTER XIV. p. 157.
Rigour of Venetian laws exemplified in the cases of Antonio Venier, Carlo Zeno, and young Foscari.
LETTER XV. p. 171.
The Council of Ten, and the State Inquisitors.—Reflections on these institutions.
LETTER XVI. p. 187.
League of Cambray.—War with Turks.—Antonio Bragadino.—Battle of Lapanta.—Disputes with the Pope.
[ix]LETTER XVII. p. 201.
Marquis of Bedamar’s conspiracy.—False accusations.—The siege of Candia.—The impatience of a Turkish Emperor.—Conclusion of the review of the Venetian Government.
LETTER XVIII. p. 215.
Venetian manners.—Opera.—Affectation.—A Duo.—Dancers.
LETTER XIX. p. 227.
No military establishment at Venice.—What supplies its place.
LETTER XX. p. 232.
Reflections on the nature of Venetian Government.—Gondoleers.—Citizens.—The Venetian subjects on the Terra Firma.
[x]LETTER XXI. p. 240.
Gallantry.—Cassinos.
LETTER XXII. p. 249.
Character of Venetians.—Customs and usages.—Influence of fashion in matters of taste.—Prejudice.—The excellence of Italian comic actors.
LETTER XXIII. p. 262.
Departure from Venice.—Padua.—St. Anthony, his tomb and miracles.
LETTER XXIV. p. 270.
Church of St. Justina.—The bodies of St. Matthew and St. Luke.—The university.—Beggars.
LETTER XXV. p. 275.
The antiquity of Padua.—The Brenta.—The Po.—The Thames.
[xi]LETTER XXVI. p. 285.
Ferrara.—The Family of Este.—Ariosto, the Emperor, and his brothers, lodge at an inn, which oversets the understanding of the landlord. An inscription.
LETTER XXVII. p. 292.
Bologna. Its government, commerce, palaces.
LETTER XXVIII. p. 301.
The academy of arts and sciences.—Church of St. Petronius.—Dominican convent.—Palaces.—Raphael.—Guido.
LETTER XXIX. p. 313.
Journey from Bologna to Ancona.—The Rubicon.—Julius Cæsar.—Pesaro.—Fano.—Claudius Nero.—Asdrubal.—Senegalia.
[xii]LETTER XXX. p. 323.
Ancona.—The influence of commerce on the characters of mankind.—The Mole.—The triumphal arch of the Emperor Trajan.
LETTER XXXI. p. 333.
Loretto.—History of the Casa Santa.
LETTER XXXII. p. 340.
Description of the sacred chapel.—The treasury.
LETTER XXXIII. p. 351.
Pilgrimages to Loretto.—Manufactures.—Confessionals.—Basso relievos.—Zeal of pilgrims.—Iron grates before the chapels.—Reflections.
LETTER XXXIV. p. 362.
Tolentino.—The Apennines.—A hermit.—Umbria.—Spoletto.
[xiii]LETTER XXXV. p. 371.
Terni.—Narni.—Otricoli.—Civita Castellana.—Campania of Rome.
LETTER XXXVI. p. 380.
Rome.—Conversazionis.—Cardinal Bernis.—The distress of an Italian lady.
LETTER XXXVII. p. 389.
Remarks on ancient and modern Rome.—The church of St. Peter’s.
LETTER XXXVIII. p. 404.
The ceremony of the Possesso.
LETTER XXXIX. p. 413.
Pantheon.—Coliseum.—Gladiators.
LETTER XL. p. 432.
The Campidoglio.—Forum Romanum.—Jews.
[xiv]LETTER XLI. p. 442.
Ruins.—Via Sacra.—Tarpeian Rock.—Campus Martius.—Various Forums.—Trajan’s Column.
LETTER XLII. p. 452.
The beatification of a Saint.
LETTER XLIII. p. 459.
Character of modern Italians.—Observations on human nature in general.—An English Officer.—Cause of the frequency of the crime of murder.
LETTER
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