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A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume II (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters

A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume II (of 2)
With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters
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Title: A View of Society and Manners in Italy, Volume II (of 2) With Anecdotes Relating to some Eminent Characters
Release Date: 2019-02-17
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 49
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Transcriber’s Note: Evident printing errors have been changed, butotherwise the original (and antiquated) spelling has been preserved,in both English and other languages. The errata have been corrected.

[i]

A
VIEW
OF
SOCIETY and MANNERS
IN
ITALY:

WITH
ANECDOTES relating to some EMINENT CHARACTERS.

BY JOHN MOORE, M.D.

VOL. II.

Strenua nos exercet inertia: navibus atque
Quadrigis petimus bene vivere. Quod petis, hic est.
Hor.

THE SECOND EDITION.

LONDON:
Printed for W. Strahan; and T. Cadell, in the Strand.
MDCCLXXXI.

[ii]


[iii]

CONTENTS
OF THE
SECOND VOLUME.

LETTER XLVI. p. 1.
Busts and statues of distinguished Romans—of Heathen Deities.—Passion of the Greeks and Romans for Sculpture.—Farnesian Hercules criticised by a Lady.—Remarks on that statue.—On the Flora.—Effect which the sight of the statues of Laocoon and his sons had on two spectators of opposite characters.—Mr. Lock’s Observations on the same group.—The Antinous.—The Apollo.
[iv]LETTER XLVII. p. 21.
The present Pope.—Ganganelli.—A Scotch Presbyterian.
LETTER XLVIII. p. 34.
Zeal of Pius VI.—Institution of the Jubilee.—Ceremony of building up the holy door of St. Peter’s by the present Pope.—The ceremony of high mass performed by the Pope on Christmas-day.—Character of the present Pope.—He is admired by the Roman women.—The Benediction pronounced in the grand area before the church of St. Peter’s.
LETTER XLIX. p. 48.
Presented to the Pope.—Reflections on the situation of Sovereigns in general.—The Sovereign Pontiff in particular.
[v]LETTER L. p. 63.
Modern Romans.—Roman women compared with those of England.—Portrait painting in Italy, and elsewhere.
LETTER LI. p. 78.
Carnival at Rome.—Masquerades and other amusements in the Corso.—Horse-races.—Serious Opera.—Great sensibility in a young woman.—Extravagant expression of a Roman citizen at the Opera.—A Serenade on Christmas morning.—Female performers prohibited on the Theatres at Rome.—Eunuchs substituted.—The effect on the minds of spectators.
LETTER LII. p. 91.
Journey from Rome to Naples.—Veletri.—Otho.—Sermonetta.—Peevish Travellers.—Monte Circello.—Piperno.—Fossa Nuova.
[vi]LETTER LIII. p. 104.
Terracina.—Via Appia.—Fundi.—Gaeta.—Illustrious French Rebels.—Bourbon.—Minturnæ.—Marius.—Hannibal.
LETTER LIV. p. 120.
Naples.—Fortress of St. Elmo.—Conversation with a Lady regarding the Carthusians.—Manufactures.—Number of inhabitants.
LETTER LV. p. 131.
Manners.
LETTER LVI. p. 138.
Respect paid to Kings during their lives.—Freedoms used with their characters after their deaths.—The King of Naples.—A game at billiards.—Characters of the King and Queen.
[vii]LETTER LVII. p. 147.
The Neapolitan Nobles.—The Peasants.
LETTER LVIII. p. 158.
Citizens.—Lawyers.—Physicians.—Clergy.—Convents.—Lazzaroni.
LETTER LIX. p. 168.
Herculaneum.—Portici.—Pompeia.
LETTER LX. p. 186.
Poetical Rehearsers in the streets of Naples.—Street Orators and Historians—Improuvisatories.—Signora Corilla.—Sensibility of Italians.—English Gentlemen of the Ton.—A Neapolitan Mountebank.
LETTER LXI. p. 204.
A visit to Mount Vesuvius.
[viii]LETTER LXII. p. 217.
Observations on the pulmonary Consumption.
LETTER LXIII. p. 257.
Neapolitan and English customs and characters criticised and compared, in a conversation between two English Gentlemen.
LETTER LXIV. p. 273.
The liquefaction of St. Januarius’s blood.—Procession, ceremonies, anxiety of the people.—Their preposterous abuse of the Saint.—Observation of a Roman Catholic.
LETTER LXV. p. 290.
The Tomb of Virgil.—Pausilippo.—A Neapolitan Valet.—Grotta del Cane.—Campi Phlegrei, Solfaterra, Monte Nuova, &c.—Puzzoli.—Baia.—Cumæ.
[ix]LETTER LXVI. p. 301.
Palace of Casserta.—African slaves.—Gardens.—Fortifications.
LETTER LXVII. p. 308.
Character of the Archduchess.—Attend the King and Queen on a visit to four nunneries.—Entertainments there.—Effect of the climate on the constitution of Nuns and others.
LETTER LXVIII. p. 318.
Tivoli.
LETTER LXIX. p. 330.
Frescati and Albano.—Dialogue between an English and Scotch Gentleman.
LETTER LXX. p. 350.
Florence.—The English Minister.—Grand Duke and Duchess.—Florentines.—Particular species of virtù.
[x]LETTER LXXI. p. 359.
Gallery.—Dialogue between an Antiquarian and a young Man concerning the Arrotino.—The Tribuna.—The Gallery of Portraits.
LETTER LXXII. p. 370.
State of the common people, particularly the peasants in Italy.—Of Roman Catholic Clergy.—Clergy in general.
LETTER LXXIII. p. 389.
Manners.—The Count Albany.
LETTER LXXIV. p. 398.
Cicisbeism.
LETTER LXXV. p. 408.
The same subject continued.
[xi]LETTER LXXVI. p. 421.
Commerce.—Jews.—Actors.—The Chapel of St. Lorenzo.—The rich not envied by the poor.—The Palazzo Pitti.—Observations on the Madonna della Seggiola.
LETTER LXXVII. p. 431.
A public Discourse by a Professor at the Academy of Arts at Bologna.—Procession of Corpus Domini.—Modena.—Parma.—Different opinions respecting a famous picture of Correggio.
LETTER LXXVIII. p. 441.
Milan.—The Cathedral.—Museum.—Manners.
LETTER LXXIX. p. 451.
Turin.—St. Ambrose.—A Procession.—Mount Cenis.—Modane.—Aiguebelle.—Hannibal’s passage into Italy.
[xii]LETTER LXXX. p. 464.
Journey from Geneva to Besançon.—Observation of a French peasant.—Of an old Woman.—Remarks of a French Friseur on the English nation.
LETTER LXXXI. p. 472.
The Marquis de F——.
LETTER LXXXII. p. 483.
Reflections on foreign travel.

[1]

A
VIEW
OF
SOCIETY and MANNERS
IN
ITALY.


LETTER XLVI.

Rome.

I beg you may not suspect me ofaffectation, or that I wish to assumethe character of a connoisseur,when I tell you, that I have verygreat pleasure in contemplating the antiquestatues and busts, of which there aresuch numbers in this city. It is a naturalcuriosity, and I have had it all my life in[2]a strong degree, to see

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