» » » The Newmarket, Bury, Thetford and Cromer Road Sport and history on an East Anglian turnpike

The Newmarket, Bury, Thetford and Cromer Road Sport and history on an East Anglian turnpike

The Newmarket, Bury, Thetford and Cromer Road
Sport and history on an East Anglian turnpike
Title: The Newmarket, Bury, Thetford and Cromer Road Sport and history on an East Anglian turnpike
Release Date: 2019-03-08
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 111
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 36

The cover image was created by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.


THE NEWMARKET, BURY, THETFORD,
AND CROMER ROAD


WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

The Brighton Road: Old Times and Newon a Classic Highway.

The Portsmouth Road, and its Tributaries:To-day and in Days of Old.

The Dover Road: Annals of an AncientTurnpike.

The Bath Road: History, Fashion, andFrivolity on an Old Highway.

The Exeter Road: The Story of the Westof England Highway.

The Great North Road: The Old MailRoad to Scotland. Two Vols.

The Norwich Road: An East AnglianHighway.

The Holyhead Road: The Mail CoachRoad to Dublin. Two Vols.

The Cambridge, Ely, and King’s LynnRoad: The Great Fenland Highway.

Cycle Rides Round London.

Stage-Coach and Mail in Days of Yore:A Picturesque History of the CoachingAge. Two Vols.

The Ingoldsby Country: Literary Landmarksof the Ingoldsby Legends.

The Oxford, Gloucester, and MilfordHaven Road.[In the Press.


THE NORWICH MAIL IN A THUNDERSTORM ON THETFORD HEATH.
From a print after J. Pollard.


The Newmarket,
Bury, Thetford,
and Cromer Road
SPORT AND HISTORY ON AN EAST
ANGLIAN TURNPIKE
By Charles G. Harper

Author of “The Brighton Road,” “The Portsmouth Road,”“The Dover Road,” “The Bath Road,” “The Exeter Road,”“The Great North Road,” “The Norwich Road,” “TheHolyhead Road,” “The Cambridge, Ely, and King’s LynnRoad,” “Stage-Coach and Mail in Days of Yore,” and “TheIngoldsby Country.”

Illustrated by the Author, and fromOld-Time Prints and Pictures

London: Chapman & Hall
LTD. 1904
[All rights reserved]

PRINTED AND BOUND BY
HAZELL, WATSON AND VINEY, LD.,
LONDON AND AYLESBURY.

TO
SIR WALTER GILBEY, Bart.,
AS SOME
ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF FAVOURS RECEIVED,
THESE RECORDS OF A ROAD
TO HIM
PECULIARLY INTIMATE.

ix

PREFACE.

I  TELL the Tale of the Road, with scraps of gossip and curious lore,
With a laugh, or a sigh, and a tear in the eye for the joys and sorrows of yore:
What were they like, those sorrows and joys, you ask, O Heir of the Ages:
Read, then, mark, learn, and perpend, an you will, from these gossipy pages.
Here, free o’er the shuddery heath, where the curlew calls shrill to his mate,
Wandered the Primitive Man, in his chilly and primitive state;
xUnkempt and shaggy, reckless of razor, of comb, or of soap:
Hunted, lived, loved, and died, in untutored and primitive hope.
For what did he hope, that picturesque heathen, hunter of fur and of feather?
For a Better Land, with weapons to hand, much quarry, and fine hunting weather.
Now white runs the devious road, o’er the trackless space that he trod,
Who hunted the heath, and died, and yielded his primitive soul unto God.
Briton and conquering Roman, Iceni, Saxon, piratical Dane,
Have marched where he joyously ranged, and peopled this desolate plain.
Dynasties, peoples, and laws have waxed, ruled, and faded, and gone,
But still spreads his primitive home, sombre, unfertile, and lone.
Here toiled the wallowing coach, where the highway goes winding away:
Here the highwayman lurked in the shadow, impatiently waiting his prey:
xiThere, where the turbulent river, unbridged, rolled fiercely in spate,
The wayfarer, seeking the deep-flooded ford, met a watery fate.
I can show you the suicide’s grave, where bracken and bryony twine,
By cross-roads on the heath, where the breath of the breeze is like wine;
And bees and butterflies flit in the sun, and life is joyous and sweet,
And takes no care for the tragedy there, where the suicide sleeps at your feet.
Dwellers in village and town, each contribute their tale to the store,
Peasants of valley and down, fishers by river and shore.
Thus I tell you the Tale of the Road, told with a laugh or a sigh;
Sought with a zest, told with a jest, wrought with a tear in the eye.
CHARLES G. HARPER.

Petersham,

Surrey,

February, 1904.


xiii

THE ROAD TO NEWMARKET, THETFORD,
NORWICH, AND CROMER.

London (General Post Office) to— MILES
Shoreditch Church
Cambridge Heath
Hackney Church
Lower Clapton 4
Lea Bridge
(Cross River Lea.)
Whip’s Cross
Snaresbrook (“The Eagle”) 8
Woodford (St. Mary’s Church) 9
Woodford Green
Woodford Wells (“Horse and Well” Inn) 10¼
Buckhurst Hill (“Bald-faced Stag”) 11
Loughton 13
Wake Arms 15
Epping 18
Thornwood Common 20¼
Potter Street
Harlow
(Cross River Stort: Stort Navigation, Harlow Wharf.)
24½
Sawbridgeworth 26¾
Spelbrook 28½
Thorley Street
(Cross River Stort.)
29½
Hockerill, Bishop Stortford 30½
Stansted Mountfitchet 33½
Ugley 35½
xivQuendon 36½
Newport
(Cross Wicken Water.)
39
Uttlesford Bridge, Audley End
(On right, Saffron Walden, 1½ mile; on left, ½ mile, Wendens Ambo.)
40¼
Littlebury 42¼
Little Chesterford (Cross River Cam.) 43¾
Great Chesterford 44½
Stump Cross 45¼
Pampisford Station, Bourn Bridge
(Cross Bourn Stream, or Linton River.)
48½
Six Mile Bottom
Level Crossing, Six Mile Bottom Station.)
54½
Devil’s Ditch 58½
Newmarket (Clock Tower) 60½
“Red Lodge” Inn
(Cross River Kennett.)
65½
Barton Mills
(Cross River Lark, Mildenhall, on left, 1 mile.)
69¾
Elveden 77
Thetford
(Cross Rivers Little Ouse and Thet.)
80¾
Larling Level Crossing 85¾
Larlingford
(Cross River Thet.)
88¾
Attleborough 94¾
Morley St. Peter Post Office 97
Wymondham 100¾
Hethersett 104¼
Cringleford
(Cross River Yare.)
106¾
xvEaton 107¼
Norwich (loop road)
(Cross River Wensum.)
109¾
Upper Hellesdon 110½
Mile Cross 111
Horsham St. Faith 114¼
Newton St. Faith 115½
Stratton Strawless 117½
Hevingham 118
Marsham
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 36
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net