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Within The Enemy's Lines

Within The Enemy's Lines
Author: Optic Oliver
Title: Within The Enemy's Lines
Release Date: 2006-06-15
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
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The Frontispiece ("He saw two men...") has been placed between thePreface and the Table of Contents.
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book cover: The Blue and the Gray by Oliver Optic: Within the Enemy's Lines

The Blue and the Gray Series


TAKEN BY THE ENEMY
WITHIN THE ENEMY'S LINES
ON THE BLOCKADE   In Press

Lee and Shepard Publishers Boston

title page: The Blue and the Gray Series / by Oliver Optic / Within the Enemy's Lines

The Blue and the Gray Series


WITHIN
THE ENEMY’S LINES

BY

OLIVER OPTIC

AUTHOR OF "THE ARMY AND NAVY SERIES," "YOUNG AMERICA ABROAD,"
"THE GREAT WESTERN SERIES," "THE WOODVILLE STORIES," "THE
STARRY FLAG SERIES," "THE BOAT-CLUB STORIES," "THE
ONWARD AND UPWARD SERIES," "THE YACHT-CLUB
SERIES," "THE LAKE-SHORE SERIES," "THE
RIVERDALE SERIES," "THE BOAT-
BUILDER SERIES," "TAKEN
BY THE ENEMY," ETC.

BOSTON 1890
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET NEXT "THE OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE"
NEW YORK CHAS. T. DILLINGHAM
718 AND 720 BROADWAY
Copyright, 1889,
By Lee and Shepard.

All rights reserved.

WITHIN THE ENEMY'S LINES.
A MON JEUNE AMI,
(QUE JE N'AI JAMAIS VU, ET QUE JE NE CONNAIS PAS,)

Monsieur Lucien Bing,

DE PARIS, FRANCE,
En Reconnaissance de laBonté de son Père,
Cette Historiette de la Guerre Civile en Amerique
Est affectueusement Dédié.
7

PREFACE

"Within the Enemy's Lines" is thesecond volume of "The Blue and the Gray Series." Like its predecessor,of course, its scenes are connected with the war of the Rebellion; andperhaps the writer ought to be thankful that he is not required in sucha work to rise to the dignity of history, but he believes that all hisevents were possible, and that every one of them has had its parallel inthe actual occurrences of the historic period of which he writes. Infact, some of the experiences of the actors in the terrible drama of aquarter of a century ago would pass more readily for fiction than forreality, and detailed on the pages of a story would be deemed impossibleby the conservative reader.

The nation has passed out of its ordeal of fire, and an excellentspirit on the part of both parties to the great strife is still growingand strengthening,8in spite of an occasional exhibition of folly on both sides on the partof those who have not outlived the bitterness of the past, and whoprobably will not outlive it. The time will certainly come when thememories of the conflict, the repetition of the stories of the war, andeven the partisan praise bestowed upon the heroes of both sides, willexcite no more ill feeling than does an allusion to the War of the Rosesin England.

In this country the advocate of either side will tell his story,relate his history, and jingle his verse in his own way, and from hisown standpoint. Those upon the other side will be magnanimous enough totolerate him, at least in silence. Histories, romances, poems, and playsrelating to the war, are produced in greater numbers as the gap betweenthe days of battle and the days of peace widens; but the old fires arenot rekindled, the old bitterness still slumbers, and the Great UnitedNation still lives on in perfect peace.

The author hopes he has done nothing on these pages to impair thegrowing harmony between the two sections which have happily become one,or to impregnate the minds of those who have been born since the strifeended with any of its9bitterness. He has endeavored to make as high-toned men on the one sideas the other, with the same moral sentiment in the one party as theother, and to exhibit their only difference in the one great question ofUnion or Disunion.

Dorchester, May 2, 1889.

illustration of quoted scene
"He saw Two Men making their way through theGrove."—Page 28.

11

CONTENTS

page
CHAPTER I.
An Unexpected Visitor15
CHAPTER II.
A Difference of Opinion27
CHAPTER III.
The dignified Naval Officer37
CHAPTER IV.
Corny Passford plays Another Part48
CHAPTER V.
Captain Carboneer and his Party59
CHAPTER VI.
The Cabin of the Florence70
CHAPTER VII.
Midshipman Christy Passford81
CHAPTER VIII.
Arranging the Signals92
CHAPTER IX.
The Approach of the Vampire103
CHAPTER X.
12A Shot from the Long Gun114
CHAPTER XI.
The Battle alongside the Bellevite125
CHAPTER XII.
The Prisoner of War136
CHAPTER XIII.
After the Battle146
CHAPTER XIV.
The Beginning of a Chase157
CHAPTER XV.
A Chase off the Bermudas168
CHAPTER XVI.
The Confederate Steamer Yazoo179
CHAPTER XVII.
A Satisfactory Order190
CHAPTER XVIII.
Lieutenant Passford in Command201
CHAPTER XIX.
Some Trouble on Board the Teaser212
CHAPTER XX.
Coming to the Point223
CHAPTER XXI.
13On a Dark and Foggy Night234
CHAPTER XXII.
A Variety of Night Signals245
CHAPTER XXIII.
Another Night Expedition256
CHAPTER XXIV.
Lieutenant Passford on a Mission206
CHAPTER XXV.
Christy becomes a Victim278
CHAPTER XXVI.
The Action on the Deck of the Teaser289
CHAPTER XXVII.
A Visit from Colonel Homer Passford300
CHAPTER XXVIII.
An Enterprise for a Dark Night311
CHAPTER XXIX.
The New Mate of the Cotton Schooner322
CHAPTER XXX.
The Prize-Master of the Judith333
15

WITHIN THE ENEMY'S LINES


CHAPTER I

AN UNEXPECTED VISITOR

"Cornelius!" exclaimed CaptainPassford, as a young man of nineteen was shown into the library of themagnificent dwelling of the millionnaire at Bonnydale, on theHudson.

"Cornelius Passford, Uncle Horatio," replied the young man, as thecaptain rushed to him and extended his hand.

"I think there can be no mistake about it; and I should have been nomore surprised if Mr. Jefferson Davis had been ushered into my libraryat this moment," continued Captain Passford, still retaining the hand ofhis nephew. "I understood that you were a soldier in the Confederatearmy."

"I was a soldier; but I am not one just now," replied the visitor,with some embarrassment in16his manner, though the circumstances were strange enough to accountfor it.

"How are your father and mother and Miss Gerty, Corny?" asked theuncle of the visitor, giving the young man the name by which he wasgenerally called both at home and in the family of his uncle.

"They were all very well when I left them," replied Corny, looking onthe floor, as though he was not altogether satisfied with himself.

"Of course, you brought letters from your father and Gerty?"

"No, sir; I brought no letters," replied Corny, and, more thanbefore, he looked as though he was not enjoying his present visit.

"No letters!" exclaimed Captain Passford, evidently surprised beyondmeasure at the apparent want of kindly feeling on the part of members ofhis brother's family in the South.

"Not a letter, Uncle Horatio," answered Corny, bracing himself up, asthough he realized that he was not presenting a demeanor such as hethought the occasion required of him.

"This is very strange," added Captain Passford, with a cloud playingon his fine features.

17"It is war between the North and the South, Uncle Horatio, and I supposemy father did not feel like writing any letters. Gerty never writes anyletters if she can help it," Corny explained.

"But Gerty used to write to Florry about once a week."

"Did she? I didn't know it. She never would write to me when I wasaway from home," said Corny, who seemed to be very anxious not to sayanything that was not consistent with the present situation, whatever itwas.

"When I parted with my brother on board of the Bellevite, both of usshed tears as we realized that war made enemies of us; but each of uspromised to do all he could for the other in case of need. I am verysure that there was not the slightest unkind feeling between us. Ofcourse, I did not expect him to write me the war news, but I think hecould have written a few lines without any allusion to the war," saidCaptain Passford, pained at this want of filial affection on the part ofhis brother.

At that moment the bell for tea rang, and the captain invited hisnephew to the table with him. The host was saddened by the absence ofnews from18his brother, of any kindly expression from one who was of the same bloodas himself. He was not quite satisfied with Corny's manner, or with thelittle he seemed to be willing to say about the rest of the family. Itwas certainly very strange that

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