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American Adventures_ A Second Trip 'Abroad at home'

American Adventures_ A Second Trip 'Abroad at home'
Title: American Adventures_ A Second Trip 'Abroad at home'
Release Date: 2006-05-03
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
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Charleston is the last stronghold of a unified American upper class; the last remainingAmerican city in which Madeira and Port and noblesse oblige are fullyand widely understood, and are employed according to the best traditionsCharleston is the last stronghold of a unified American upper class; the last remainingAmerican city in which Madeira and Port and noblesse oblige are fullyand widely understood, and are employed according to the best traditions

AMERICAN ADVENTURES

A SECOND TRIP "ABROAD AT HOME" BY
JULIAN STREET

WITH PICTORIAL SIDELIGHTS
BY
WALLACE MORGAN

NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1917


Copyright, 1917, by
The Century Co.


Copyright, 1916, 1917, by
P. F. Collier & Son, Inc.


Published, November, 1917


TO MY AUNTAND SECOND MOTHER

JULIA ROSS LOW


[Pg vii]

FOREWORD

Though much has been written of the South, itseems to me that this part of our country is less understoodthan any other part. Certainly the South, itself,feels that this is true. Its relationship to the Northmakes me think of nothing so much as that of a pretty,sensitive wife, to a big, strong, amiable, if somewhatthick-skinned husband. These two had one greatquarrel which nearly resulted in divorce. He thoughther headstrong; she thought him overbearing. Thequarrel made her ill; she has been for some time recovering.But though they have settled their difficulties andare living again in amity together, and though he, man-like,has half forgotten that they ever quarreled at all,now that peace reigns in the house again, she has notforgotten. There still lingers in her mind the feelingthat he never really understood her, that he never understoodher problems and her struggles, and that henever will. And it seems to me further that, as isusually the case with wives who consider themselves misunderstood,the fault is partly, but by no means altogether,hers. He, upon one hand, is inclined to pass thematter off with a: "There, there! It's all over now.Just be good and forget it!" while she, in the depths ofher heart, retains a little bit of wistfulness, a little[Pg viii]wounded feeling, which causes her to say to herself:"Thank God our home was not broken up, but—I wishthat he could be a little more considerate, sometimes, inview of all that I have suffered."

For my part, I am the humble but devoted friend ofthe family. Having known him first, having been fromboyhood his companion, I may perhaps have sympathizedwith him in the beginning. But since I havecome to know her, too, that is no longer so. And Ido think I know her—proud, sensitive, high-strung,generous, captivating beauty that she is! Moreover,after the fashion of many another "friend of thefamily," I have fallen in love with her. Loving herfrom afar, I send her as a nosegay these chapters gatheredin her own gardens. If some of the flowers are ofa kind for which she does not care, if some have thorns,even if some are only weeds, I pray her to rememberthat from what was growing in her gardens I was forcedto make my choice, and to believe that, whatever the defectsof my bouquet, it is meant to be a bunch of roses.

J. S.

October 1, 1917.


The Author makes his grateful acknowledgments tothe old friends and the new ones who assisted him uponthis journey. And once more he desires to express hisgratitude to the friend and fellow-traveler whose illustrationsare far from being his only contribution to thisvolume.

—J. S.

New York, October, 1917.


CONTENTS

THE BORDERLAND
CHAPTER PAGE
ION JOURNEYS THROUGH THE STATES3
IIA BALTIMORE EVENING13
IIIWHERE THE CLIMATES MEET27
IVTRIUMPHANT DEFEAT38
VTERRAPIN AND THINGS44
VIDOUGHOREGAN MANOR AND THE CARROLLS53
VIIA RARE OLD TOWN69
VIIIWE MEET THE HAMPTON GHOST80
IXARE WE STANDARDIZED?89
XHARPER'S FERRY AND JOHN BROWN97
XITHE VIRGINIAS AND THE WASHINGTONS105
XIII RIDE A HORSE117
XIIIINTO THE OLD DOMINION136
XIVCHARLOTTESVILLE AND MONTICELLO150
XVTHE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA159
XVIFOX-HUNTING IN VIRGINIA169
XVII"A CERTAIN PARTY"186
XVIIITHE LEGACY OF HATE193
XIX"YOU-ALL" AND OTHER SECTIONAL MISUNDERSTANDINGS203
XXIDIOMS AND ARISTOCRACY214
XXITHE CONFEDERATE CAPITAL222
XXIIRANDOM RICHMOND NOTES233
XXIIIJEDGE CRUTCHFIELD'S COT242
XXIVNORFOLK AND ITS NEIGHBORHOOD248
XXVCOLONEL TAYLOR AND GENERAL LEE258
 
THE HEART OF THE SOUTH
XXVIRALEIGH AND JOSEPHUS DANIELS273
XXVIIITEMS FROM "THE OLD NORTH STATE"285
XXVIIIUNDER ST. MICHAEL'S CHIMES296
XXIXHISTORY AND ARISTOCRACY312
XXXPOLITICS, A NEWSPAPER AND ST. CECILIA326
XXXI"GULLA" AND THE BACK COUNTRY338
XXXIIOUT OF THE PAST349
XXXIIIALIVE ATLANTA356
XXXIVGEORGIA JOURNALISM369
XXXVSOME ATLANTA INSTITUTIONS384
XXXVIA BIT OF RURAL GEORGIA392
XXXVIIA YOUNG METROPOLIS403
XXXVIIIBUSY BIRMINGHAM417
XXXIXAN ALLEGORY OF ACHIEVEMENT426
XLTHE ROAD TO ARCADY440
XLIA MISSISSIPPI TOWN447
XLIIOLD TALES AND A NEW GAME458
XLIIIOUT OF THE LONG AGO467
XLIVTHE GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND HIM474
XLVVICKSBURG OLD AND NEW482
XLVISHREDS AND PATCHES494
XLVIITHE BAFFLING MISSISSIPPI500
XLVIIIOLD RIVER DAYS508
XLIXWHAT MEMPHIS HAS ENDURED518
LMODERN MEMPHIS535
 
FARTHEST SOUTH
LIBEAUTIFUL SAVANNAH553
LIIMISS "JAX" AND SOME FLORIDA GOSSIP572
LIIIPASSIONATE PALM BEACH579
LIVASSORTED AND RESORTED FLORIDA595
LVA DAY IN MONTGOMERY603
LVITHE CITY OF THE CREOLE619
LVIIHISTORY, THE CREOLE, AND HIS DUELS629
LVIIIFROM ANTIQUES TO PIRATES648
LIXANTOINE'S AND MARDI GRAS663
LXFINALE675

[Pg xiii]


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

[Transcriber's Note: Illustrations were interleaved between pages in the original text. In this version,they have been moved beside the relevant section of the text. Page numbers below reflect the position of theillustration in the original text but links link to current position of illustrations.]

FACING PAGE
Charleston is the last stronghold of a unified American upper class;the last remaining American city in which Madeira and Port andnoblesse oblige are fully and widely understood, and are employedaccording to the best traditionsFrontispiece
"Railroad tickets!" said the baggageman with exaggerated patience8
Can most travellers, I wonder, enjoy as I do a solitary walk, bynight, through the mysterious streets of a strange city?17
Coming out of my slumber with the curious and unpleasant sense ofbeing stared at, I found his eyes fixed upon me24
Mount Vernon Place is the centre of Baltimore32
If she is shopping for a dinner party, she may order the costly andaristocratic diamond-back terrapin, sacred in Baltimore as is theSacred Cod in Boston48
Doughoregan Manor—the house was a buff-colored brick65
I began to realize that there was no one coming80
Harper's Ferry is an entrancing old town; a drowsy place piled upbeautifully yet carelessly upon terraced roads clinging to steephillsides100
"What's the matter with him?" I asked, stopping117
When I came down, dressed for riding, my companion was making adrawing; the four young ladies were with him, none of them in riding habits124
Claymont Court is one of the old Washington houses132
Chatham, the old Fitzhugh house, now the residence of Mark Sullivan148
Monticello stands on a lofty hilltop, with vistas, between trees ofneighboring valleys, hills, and mountains157
Like Venice, the University of Virginia should first be seen bymoonlight168
One party was stationed on the top of an old-time mail-coach,bearing the significant initials "F. F. V."180
The Piedmont Hunt Race Meet189
The Southern negro is the world's peasant supreme200
The Country Club of Virginia, out to the west of Richmond216
Judge Crutchfield228
Negro women squatting upon boxes in old shadowy lofts stem thetobacco leaves237
The Judge: "What did he do, Mandy?"244
Some genuine old-time New York ferryboats help to complete theillusion that Norfolk is New York253
"The Southern statesman who serves his section best, serves hiscountry best"280
St. Philip's is the more beautiful for the open space before it300
Opposite St. Philip's, a perfect example of the rude architecture ofan old French village305
In the doorway and gates of the Smyth house, in Legaré Street, I wasstruck with a Venetian suggestion316
Nor is the Charleston background a mere arras of recollection320
Charleston has a stronger, deeper-rooted city entity than all thecities of the Middle West rolled into one328
The interior is the oldest looking thing in the United States—GooseCreek Church344
A reminder of the Chicago River—Atlanta353
With the whole Metropolitan Orchestra playing dance music all night long368
The office buildings are city office buildings, and are sufficientlynumerous to look very much at home376
The negro roof-garden, Odd Fellows' Building, Atlanta385
I was never so conscious, as at the time of our visit to the BurgePlantation, of the superlative soft sweetness of the spring396
The planters cease their work400
Birmingham—the thin veil of smoke from far-off iron furnacessoftens the city's serrated outlines408
Birmingham practices unremittingly the pestilential habit of"cutting in" at dances424
Gigantic movements and mutations, Niagara-like noises, great burstsof flame like falling fragments from the sun437
A shaggy, unshaven, rawboned man, gray-haired and collarless, satnear the window444
Gaze upon the character called Daniel Voorhees Pike!456
The houses were full of the suggestion of an easy-going home lifeand an informal hospitality465
Her hands looked very white and small against his dark coat480
As water flows down the hills of Vicksburg to the river, so thevisitor's thoughts flow down to the great spectacular, mischievous, dominating stream485
Over the tenement roofs one catches sight of sundry other buildingsof a more self-respecting character492
Vicksburg negroes497
On some of the boats negro fish-markets are conducted504
The old Klein house512
Citizens go at midday to the square520
Hanging in the air above the middle of the stream536
These small parks give Savannah the quality which differentiates itfrom all other American cities556
The Thomas house, in Franklin Square561
You will see them having tea, and dancing under the palm fronds ofthe cocoanut grove576
Cocktail hour at The Breakers581
Nowhere is the sand more like a deep warm dust of yellow gold588
The couples on the platform were "ragging"600
Harness held together by that especial Providence which watches overnegro mending613
It was a very jolly fair616
The mysterious old Absinthe House, founded 1799620
St. Anthony's Garden632
Courtyard of the
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