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The Delight Makers

The Delight Makers
Title: The Delight Makers
Release Date: 2006-05-04
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Delight Makers, by Adolf Bandelier

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Title: The Delight Makers

Author: Adolf Bandelier

Release Date: May 4, 2006 [eBook #18310]
Most recently updated: January 21, 2009

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE DELIGHT MAKERS***

 

E-text prepared by Roger Frank, Betty Reynolds,
and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net/)

 


 

THE

DELIGHT MAKERS
BY
ADOLF F. BANDELIER
WITH AN INTRODUCTION
By CHARLES F. LUMMIS
ILLUSTRATED





NEW YORK
DODD, MEAD AND COMPANY
PUBLISHERS


Copyright, 1890
By Dodd, Mead and Company
Copyright, 1916
By Dodd, Mead and Company
Copyright, 1918
By Mrs. Fanny R. Bandelier

Printed in U. S. A.


Portrait of the Author
Portrait of the Author

Contents

PREFACE 
PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION 
NOTE 
IN MEMORY 
ILLUSTRATIONS 
  
CHAPTER I.1
CHAPTER II.26
CHAPTER III.60
CHAPTER IV.80
CHAPTER V.105
CHAPTER VI.129
CHAPTER VII.155
CHAPTER VIII.174
CHAPTER IX.195
CHAPTER X.220
CHAPTER XI.243
CHAPTER XII.272
CHAPTER XIII.289
CHAPTER XIV.307
CHAPTER XV.327
CHAPTER XVI.347
CHAPTER XVII.368
CHAPTER XVIII.392
CHAPTER XIX.416
CHAPTER XX.437
CHAPTER XXI.465
CONCLUSION.485

PREFACE

This story is the result of eight years spent in ethnological andarchæological study among the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. The firstchapters were written more than six years ago at the Pueblo of Cochiti.The greater part was composed in 1885, at Santa Fé, after I had bestowedupon the Tehuas the same interest and attention I had previously paid totheir neighbours the Queres. I was prompted to perform the work by aconviction that however scientific works may tell the truth about theIndian, they exercise always a limited influence upon the generalpublic; and to that public, in our country as well as abroad, the Indianhas remained as good as unknown. By clothing sober facts in the garb ofromance I have hoped to make the "Truth about the Pueblo Indians" moreaccessible and perhaps more acceptable to the public in general.

The sober facts which I desire to convey may be divided into threeclasses,—geographical, ethnological, and archæological. Thedescriptions of the country and of its nature are real. The descriptionsof manners and customs, of creed and rites, are from actual observationsby myself and other ethnologists, from the statements of trustworthyIndians, and from a great number of Spanish sources of old date, inwhich the Pueblo Indian is represented as he lived when still unchangedby contact with European civilization.

The descriptions of architecture are based upon investigations of ruinsstill in existence on the sites where they are placed in the story.

The plot is my own. But most of the scenes described I have witnessed;and there is a basis for it in a dim tradition preserved by the Queresof Cochiti that their ancestors dwelt on the Rito de los Frijoles anumber of centuries ago, and in a similar tradition among the Tehuas ofthe Pueblo of Santa Clara in regard to the cave-dwellings of the Puye.

A word to the linguist. The dialect spoken by the actors is that ofCochiti for the Queres, that of San Juan for the Tehuas. In order toavoid the complicated orthography latterly adopted by scientists forIndian dialects, I have written Indian words and phrases as they wouldbe pronounced in continental languages. The letter ā is used todenote the sound of a in "hare."

To those who have so kindly assisted me,—in particular to Rev. E. W.Meany of Santa Fé, and to Dr. Norton B. Strong, of the United StatesArmy,—I herewith tender my heartfelt thanks.

AD. F. BANDELIER

Santa Fé, New Mexico.


PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION

The aim of our good and lamented friend in writing this book was toplace before the public, in novelistic garb, an account of the life andactivities of the Pueblo Indians before the coming of white men. Theinformation on which it is based was the result of his personalobservations during many years of study among the sedentary tribes ofNew Mexico and in Spanish archives pertaining thereto in connection withhis researches for the Archæological Institute of America. He spentmonths in continuous study at the Tehua pueblo of San Juan and theQueres pueblo of Cochití, and the regard in which he was held by thesimple folk of those and other native villages was sincerelyaffectionate. Bandelier's labors in his chosen field were commenced at atime when a battle with hardship was a part of the daily routine, andhis method of performing the tasks before him was of the kind thatproduced important results often at the expense of great suffering,which on more than one occasion almost shut out his life.

Because not understood, The Delight Makers was not received at firstwith enthusiastic favor. It seemed unlike the great student of technicalproblems deliberately to write a book the layman might read withinterest and profit; but his object once comprehended, the volume wasreceived in the spirit in which the venture was initiated and for a longwhile search for a copy has often been in vain.

Bandelier has come unto his own. More than one serious student of theethno-history of our Southwest has frankly declared that the basis offuture investigation of the kind that Bandelier inaugurated will alwaysbe the writings of that eminent man. Had he been permitted to live andlabor, nothing would have given him greater satisfaction than theknowledge that the people among whom he spent so many years are of thosewho fully appreciate the breadth of his learning and who have beeninstrumental in the creation, by proclamation of the President, of the"Bandelier National Monument," for the purpose of preserving for futuregenerations some of the archæological remains he was the first toobserve and describe.

F. W. HODGE.

Smithsonian Institution,
  Washington, D. C.,

    September 25, 1916.


NOTE

A special interest attaches to the illustrations, now first included inthis edition. Many of them are from photographs made by Chas. F. Lummisin 1890, under the supervision of Bandelier, and with special referenceto "The Delight Makers," then being written. These two friends were thefirst students to explore the Tyuonyi and its neighborhood. In rain andshine, afoot, without blankets or overcoats, with no more provision thana little atole (popcorn meal) and sweet chocolate, they climbed thecliffs, threaded the cañons, slept in caves or under trees, measured,mapped and photographed the ruins and landscapes with a 40-pound camera,and laid the basis-notes for part of Bandelier's monumental "FinalReport" to the Archæological Institute of America.

A few later photographs from the same hand show part of the excavationdone in the Tyuonyi by the School of American Archæology—through whoseloving and grateful efforts this cañon has been set apart as a NationalMonument bearing the name of its discoverer and chronicler,

ADOLF F. BANDELIER.

Thanks are due also to Hon. Frederick C. Hicks, M.C., for six veryinteresting photographs of the Zuñis and their country.


IN MEMORY

One day of August, 1888, in the teeth of a particular New Mexicosand-storm that whipped pebbles the size of a bean straight to yourface, a ruddy, bronzed, middle-aged man, dusty but unweary with hissixty-mile tramp from Zuñi, walked into my solitary camp at LosAlamitos. Within the afternoon I knew that here was the mostextraordinary mind I had met. There and then began the uncommonfriendship which lasted till his death, a quarter of a century later;and a love and admiration which will be of my dearest memories so longas I shall live. I was at first suspicious of the "pigeon-hole memory"which could not only tell me some Queres word I was searching for, butadd: "Policárpio explained that to me in Cochití, November 23, 1881."But I discovered that this classified memory was an integral part ofthis extraordinary genius. The acid tests of life-long collaborationproved not only this but the judicial poise, the marvelous insight andthe intellectual chastity of Bandelier's mind. I cannot conceive ofanything in the world which would have made him trim his sails as ahistorian or a student for any advantage here or hereafter.

Aside from keen mutual interests of documentary and ethnologic study, wecame to know one another humanly by the hard proof of the Frontier.Thousands of miles of wilderness and desert we trudged side byside—camped, starved, shivered, learned and were Glad together. Ourjoint pursuits in comfort at our homes (in Santa Fé and Isleta,respectively) will always be memorable to me; but never so wonderful asthat companioning in the hardships of what was, in our day, the reallydifficult fringe of the Southwest. There was not a decent road. We hadno endowment, no vehicles. Bandelier was once loaned a horse; and afterriding two miles, led it the rest of the thirty. So we went always byfoot; my big camera and glass plates in the knapsack on my back, theheavy tripod under my arm; his aneroid, surveying instruments, andsatchel of the almost microscopic notes which he kept fully andprecisely every night by the camp-fire (even when I had to crouch overhim and the precious paper with my water-proof focusing cloth) somehowbestowed about him. Up and down pathless cliffs, through tangled cañons,fording icy streams and ankle-deep sands, we travailed; no blankets,overcoats, or other shelter; and the only commissary a few cakes ofsweet chocolate, and a small sack of parched popcorn meal. Our "lodgingwas the cold ground." When we could find a cave, a tree, or anything totemper the wind or keep off part of the rain, all right. If not, theOpen. So I came to love him as well as revere. I had known many"scientists" and what happened when they really got Outdoors. He was inno way an athlete—nor even muscular. I was both—and not very longbefore had completed my thirty-five-hundred-mile "Tramp Across theContinent." But I never had to "slow down" for him. Sometimes it wasnecessary to use laughing force to detain him at dark where we had waterand a leaning cliff, instead of stumbling on through

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