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Catholic Problems in Western Canada

Catholic Problems in Western Canada
Title: Catholic Problems in Western Canada
Release Date: 2006-05-11
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Catholic Problems in Western Canada, byGeorge Thomas Daly

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: Catholic Problems in Western Canada

Author: George Thomas Daly

Release Date: May 11, 2006 [EBook #18378]

Language: English

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CATHOLIC PROBLEMS IN WESTERN ***

Produced by Al Haines

Catholic Problems

in

Western Canada

By

George Thomas Daly, C.SS.R.

With preface by the Most Reverend O. E. Mathieu,
  Archbishop of Regina

TORONTO: THE MACMILLAN COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD., AT ST. MARTIN'S HOUSE

Permissu Superiorum

ARTHUR T. COUGHLAN, C.SS.R., Provincial.

Imprimatur

EDWARD ALFRED LEBLANC, Bishop of St. John, N.B.

St. John, N.B., December 8th, 1920.

Copyright, Canada, 1921

BY THE MACMILLAN COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
TORONTO

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED

TO
THE CATHOLIC HIERARCHY
OF CANADA.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

PART 1.—RELIGIOUS PROBLEMS

CHAPTER 1.—THIS CALL OF THE WEST

A Call from the West—The Call of the Catholic Church in the West—The
Response of the East—The Specific Object of the Catholic Church
Extension Society.

CHAPTER 2.—BRIDGING THE CHASM

The Catholic Church Extension Society in Canada—Its Principles and
Policy.

CHAPTER 3.—PRO ARIS ET FOCIS

The Ruthenian Problem—A Religious and National Problem—Its
Phases—Its Solution.

CHAPTER 4.—WHY? WHAT? WHO?

The necessity of a Field Secretary for the Organization of our
Missionary Activities.

CHAPTER 5.—PLOUGHING THE SANDS

The Church Union Movement; its Causes and Various Manifestations—The
Protestant and Catholic View-point.

CHAPTER 6.—"THEM ALSO I MUST BRING" (Jo, v, 16)

The Apostolate to non-Catholics; its Obligation—What have we
Done?—What Can we Do?

CHAPTER 7.—PROS AND CONS

Obstacles that Impede. . . . Circumstances that Help the Work of the
Church in Western Canada.

PART 2.—EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS

CHAPTER 8.—WHY SEPARATE?

A Moral Reason—A Social Reason—A Political Reason—A National
Reason—A British Reason—A Religious Reason . . . for our "Separate
Schools."

CHAPTER 9.—A WINDOW IN THE WEST

A Crusade for Better Schools in Saskatchewan: Its History—Its
Lessons—An Invitation and a Warning.

CHAPTER 10.—UNICUIQUE SUUM

Principle on which should be Based the Division of Company-taxesbetween Public and Separate Schools.

CHAPTER 11.—DREAM OF REALITY

Higher Education in Western Canada—Duty of the Hour—University
Training, Condition of Genuine leadership—For Catholics Higher
Education means Higher Catholic Education—The Concerted Action of all
Catholics in Western Canada can make a Western Catholic University a
Reality.

PART 3—SOCIAL PROBLEMS

CHAPTER 12.—BEYOND BERLIN

After-war Problems from a Catholic view-point—Reconstruction—The Dutyof the Hour.

CHAPTER 13.—"WHOM DO MEN SAY THAT THE SON OF MAN IS?" (Matt. xvi, 13)

Public Opinion and the Catholic Church—What is Public Opinion—Its
Power—How it is Formed—The Catholic Church in its Relation to Public
Opinion—Our Duties to Public Opinion.

CHAPTER 14.—"TRUTH SHALL MAKE YOU FREE" (Jo. viii, 32)

Facts—Principles—Policy of the Catholic Truth Society—Its Value forthe Church in Western Canada.

CHAPTER 15.—A SUGGESTION

Importance of the Catholic Press—Requisites for its Success in the
West.

CHAPTER 16.—THE NEW CANADIAN

Immigration—Are we Ready for it?—Outline of a Plan of Action.

CHAPTER 17—"UT SINT UNUM"

A Catholic Congress of the Western Provinces, the Ultimate Solution ofall their Problems—What is a Congress?—Its Utility—ItsNecessity—Tentative Programme of a General Congress.

CHAPTER 18.—"ULTIMA VERBA"

APPENDIX

I.—AMERICANIZATION

A Thought-compelling and Illuminating Article, by L. P. Edwards, in
"New York Times," on Problems that Confront Canada also.

II.—THE FAD OF AMERICANIZATION

By Glenn Frank in the "Century," June, 1920.

III.—AMERICANIZATION WORK MUST PROCEED SLOWLY

By Rev. D. P. Tighe, "Detroit News," Aug. 24, 1919.

PREFACE

Letter of the Most Reverend O. E. Mathieu,
  Archbishop of Regina, to the Author

REVEREND G. DALY, C.SS.R.,
  St. John, N.B.

Dear Father,—

Quebec Province claims you as her son. There you lived for many years;there you learned to admire the peaceful life and to appreciate thegenuine happiness of our patriarchal families; there you were aneyewitness of the "bonne entente" and noble rivalry which exist betweenthe ethnical groups that go to make up its population.

At various times your sacred ministry has brought you in touch with theother Eastern Provinces of our broad Dominion. A keen observer, youreadily grasped existing conditions and the mentality of the variouselements of our Canadian Population.

The year 1917 found you laboring in our beloved Province ofSaskatchewan, as Rector of our Cathedral. For three years you livedwith us. The possibilities of our great West soon appealed to yourenthusiastic heart. The various problems which here engage theattention of the Church fired your soul with noble ambition. I shallnever forget the good you have done in the parish committed to yourcare. I shall be ever grateful for the zeal with which you devotedyourself, heart and soul, to the guidance of those under your charge.You found your happiness in making others happy, remembering thatkindly actions alone give to our days their real value. Your priestlyheart understood that when one is in God's service he must not becontent with doing things in a half-hearted way or without willingsacrifice.

But the voice of your Superiors called you to another field of action,and with ready obedience you hastened to the Eastern extremity of theDominion. I can assure you, dear Father, that, though absent, yourmemory is still fresh among us. Your old parishioners of Holy RosaryCathedral, and others with whom you came in contact through missionsand other work throughout the Province, have kept a fond and faithfulremembrance of your Reverence. The citizens of Regina who are not ofour Faith still remember the noble efforts you always put forth topromote good will and concord in the community at large. Your charityproved to them that we were not born to hate but to love one another.It affords me great pleasure to see that since you left the West youhave continued to have its welfare at heart, its problems ever presentin your thought. For you tell me that you are just about to publish abook on "Catholic problems in Western Canada."

The West, you have known, studied and loved. The tremendous obstacles,as well as the great possibilities which there face the Church at thiscritical hour of our history, have left on your mind a lastingimpression. You fully realize, dear Father, that our Western problemsare not sufficiently known by the Catholics of the East. Were theimportance of these issues fully appreciated by all, a greater interestwould be taken in regard to their immediate solution. Catholicsthroughout the Country, you rightly state, are obliged to further theinfluence of Holy Mother Church in our Western Provinces, which willcertainly be called upon within a very near future to play a mostimportant part in our Dominion.

To draw the attention of Catholics to the critical issues whichconditions, during the last decade or so, have created in our greatWest, and to offer solutions which will be beneficial to the Church,are the noble motives that have prompted your important work and guidedyou on to its completion.

Even though some may not fully share your views, or see eye to eye withyou on the means of action you suggest, you will have neverthelessattained your object. You will have, I am confident, awakened interestin our Western problems which, I repeat, are unfortunately not known,or at least, are not fully appreciated by too many of our own.

There is a saying that the heart has reasons which the mind does notfully grasp. I feel sure that the many hours you have spent in thecomposition of your book, coupled with the strenuous work of themissions, to which you have consecrated yourself with unrelenting zealsince your departure from our midst, have been calculated to weakenyour health. But your heart, unmindful of self, did not consider timeand fatigue so long as your fellow-man was being benefited. Your lovefor God and His Church induced you to undertake this work and carry itthrough to completion. Your book, I am sure, is destined to producehappy results. This will be your consolation and your reward. AskingGod to bless your work and wishing you to accept this expression of myconstant gratitude and sincere friendship, I remain as ever,

Devotedly yours,

OLIVIER ELZEAR MATHIEU,

Archbishop of Regina.

ARCHBISHOP'S HOUSE,

REGINA, November 21st, 1920.

INTRODUCTION

Praesentia tangens. . . . .
  Futura prospiciens.

Problems characterize every age, sum up the complex life of nations andgive them their distinctive features. They form that moral atmospherewhich makes one period of history responsible and tributary to another.And indeed, in every human problem there is an ethical element. Thisimponderable factor, which often baffles our calculations, alwaysremains the true, permanent driving force. For in the last analysis ofhuman things, morality is what reachest furthest and matters most.

Problems may vary with the times and the countries, and yet, the moralissues involved never change; for, right is eternal. To detect thisethical element amid the ever restless waves of human activities hasever been the noble and constant effort of true leaders. Like thepilot they are ever watching for the lighted buoy on the tossing waves.

This moral element underlying all our national problems is what affectsCatholics as such, or rather the medium through which Catholics arecalled to affect them. No period should prove more interesting toCatholics than our own, for the very principles of Christian Ethics arenow being questioned and vindicated in the lives of nations, either bythe benefits accruing from their application, or by the evilsconsequent upon their neglect.

Our neo-pagan world is learning by a cruel and sad experience thatReligion is the foundation of morality, and morality that of truelegality. "For unless certain things antecedent to conscience begranted and firmly held, 'conscience' becomes synonymous with'sentiment.'"

Mr. Lloyd George himself, addressing a religious gathering in Wales onJune 9, 1920, recognized Religion as the only bulwark able to resistthe rising tide of anarchy. "Bolshevism is spreading throughout theworld," said the British Premier, "and the churches can alone save thepeople from the disaster which will ensue, if this anarchy of will andaim continues to spread." The task of the churches, he continued, wasgreater than that which came within the compass of any political party.Political parties might provide the lamps, lay the wires and turn thecurrent on to certain machinery, but the churches must be the powerstations. If the generating stations were destroyed, whatever thearrangements and plans of the political parties might be, it would notbe long before the light was cut off from the homes of the people. Thedoctrines taught by the churches are the only security against thetriumph of human selfishness, and human selfishness unchecked willdestroy any plans, however perfect, which politicians may devise.

This period of history, to quote Gladstone, is "an agitated andexpectant age." The world is travelling fast into a new era. Themodern social fabric, built on the shifting sands of selfishness andinjustice is rocking on its foundations. Amid accumulated ruinsnations are searching for the basic principles of true Reconstruction.This period of unrest is in itself a challenge to Christianity, to theChurch. But the vitalizing force of Christianity can solve theseproblems of a decrepit civilization just as it solved the problem oftottering Rome. Problems therefore must be faced and solved. EveryCatholic has his place in this world-wide work. If our religion doesnot make its influence felt in every phase of our life's activities, itis—as far as our life and its influence on others is concerned—agigantic fraud. Bishop Kettler understood this pressing obligationwhen, breaking away from a too conservative programme of action, he wasthe first in the Church to give an impetus to the study of the modernsocial problem.

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