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The Moravians in Labrador

The Moravians in Labrador
Author: Anonymous
Title: The Moravians in Labrador
Release Date: 2006-05-14
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 25 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Moravians in Labrador, by Anonymous

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Title: The Moravians in Labrador

Author: Anonymous

Release Date: May 14, 2006 [eBook #18391]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE MORAVIANS IN LABRADOR***

 

E-text prepared by a www.PGDP.net Volunteer, Jeannie Howse,
Mark C. Orton, Suzanne Lybarger,
and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team
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from page images generously made available by
Early Canadiana Online
(http://www.canadiana.org/eco/index.html)

 

Note: Images of the original pages are available through Early Canadiana Online. See http://www.canadiana.org/ECO/mtq?doc=38020

 

Transcriber's Note:


The original images were of very poor quality, some punctuation has been inferred.

This document was originally published in 1822 and containsarchaic spelling, and a number of obvious typographicalerrors, the latter of which have been corrected. For a complete list, please see theend of this document.

Page numbering is consistent with the original document.

Hover over greek text for the transliteration.

 


 

 

MORAVIANS
IN
LABRADOR.




[i]

THE
MORAVIANS IN LABRADOR.



From Greenland's icy mountains
The joyful sound proclaim,
Till each remotest nation
Has learnt the Saviour's name.
Waft, waft, ye winds, his story,
And you, ye waters, roll,
Till like a sea of glory,
It spreads from pole to pole.
Heber.


EDINBURGH:
PRINTED BY J. RITCHIE.
SOLD BY W. WHYTE & CO., W. OLIPHANT, WAUGH& INNES,
AND J. LINDSAY & CO., EDINBURGH;
M. OGLE, AND W. COLLINS, GLASGOW;
HAMILTON, ADAMS & CO., AND J. NISBET, LONDON.
M.DCCC.XXXIII.


[ii]

ADVERTISEMENT.


The present small volume which, in some measure, owes its origin tothe suggestion of that long tried, excellent, and first friend of theMoravians in Scotland, R. Plenderleath, Esq., and being cordiallyapproved of by the Rev P. Latrobe, London, though connected withconsiderable labour, great part of it having been translated from theGerman, has been cheerfully executed, and is intended to promote apurpose similar to that of the first edition of the Moravians inGreenland—to aid the subscriptions of some private friends who wishto communicate occasionally with the Missionaries in Labrador, andsend them a few articles of comfort which the general funds do notsupply. In allusion to this, the following extract from a letter,addressed to a friend in this city, from one of these devoted men,will be pleasant to the friends of the missions—"Dear Sister A ——,You kindly mention that a Society of Christian Ladies was formed inEdinburgh in aid of the missions in Greenland and Labrador, and hadsent a gift of clothes, for which I beg you will accept of our unitedthanks. There are many poor widows and orphans in our Esquimauxcongregations who are in the greatest necessity, to whom any littlearticle of clothing will be most welcome. When our dear friends sendus any thing of this kind, we always keep it till Christmas, and thendivide them, that they may appear clothed on Christmas night. Thedividing scene is often very affecting, their sobbing and weepingprevents their expressing their gratitude in words, but one mayeasily perceive how deeply they feel their kindness."




[iii]

CONTENTS.


Introduction. Page vii
CHAPTER I.  
  Hudson's Bay Company first settle among the Esquimaux.—J.C. Erhardt suggests a mission—his letter to the Moravian Bishop.—M. Stach consulted.—London merchants undertake the scheme—engage Erhardt—its fatal conclusion.—Jans Haven employed by the Brethren—encouraged by the British Government, sets out on a voyage of discovery—his providential arrival at Quirpont—first meeting with the Esquimaux—his interesting intercourse—returns to England. His second expedition, accompanied by Drachart and other missionaries—their proceedings.—Drachart's remarkable conversation with the natives—influence of the missionaries in preserving peace—their religious communications with the savages—the curiosity of the latter—their thievish tricks—their kindness to the missionaries—a dreadful storm.—Drachart and Haven entertained by an Angekok—his incantations—their parting addresses to each other—the missionaries return to London. 37
CHAPTER II.  
  Contests between the colonists and savages revive—Murderous skirmish.—Mikak.—Karpik, his conversion and death.—The Moravians receive a grant of land on the coast of Labrador—resolve to renew the mission—voyage to explore the land.—Jans Haven, Drachart, &c., arrive at Labrador—their interview with the natives—meet Mikak and Tuglavina—their kindness.—Segulliak the sorcerer.—Anxiety of the Esquimaux for their remaining among them—ground purchased for a settlement—manner of bargaining with the Esquimaux—sail for Esquimaux bay—the natives troublesome—the Captain's method of checking them.—Conduct of the missionaries—they preach on shore.—Conversation with the Esquimaux.—Search out a place[iv] for a settlement—purchase it of the natives—ceremonies used on the occasion—take formal possession. Deputation return to England 73
CHAPTER III.  
  Preparations for establishing a settlement in Labrador.—A love feast.—Missionaries leave London—erect a mission-house at Nain—-regulations for their intercourse with the natives—visited by great numbers—manner of instruction—they retire in winter, are visited by the Brethren in their houses.—Death of Anauke.—An incantation.—Adventures in search of a dead whale.—P.E. Lauritz deputed by the conference—visits the missions—his excursion along the coast.—A sloop of war arrives to examine the settlement—the Captain's report.—Jans Haven's voyage to the north—interesting occurrences.—Lauritz leaves Nain—his concluding address.—The Brethren propose new settlements—disastrous voyage in search of a situation.—Liebisch appointed Superintendant.—An Angekok baptized—his address to the natives.—Jans Haven commences a new station at Okkak—received joyfully by the natives—six Esquimaux baptized—proceedings at Nain.—Missionary accompanies the Esquimaux to a rein-deer-hunt.—Third settlement—Hopedale founded.—Remarkable preservation of the Missionaries. 97
CHAPTER IV.  
  Esquimaux visit the English settlements—pernicious consequences—dreadful accident—famine—unexpected supply of food and skins.—Emigration from Okkak—missionaries' care of the wanderers, who return disappointed.—Terrible tales from the south.—Inquirers separated from the heathen.—Popish priest attempts to seduce the converts.—Brother Rose inspects Hopedale.—Karpik the sorcerer.—Peter's fall.—Visits to the south renewed.—Parting address of the brethren.—Epidemic.—Death of Daniel—of Esther.—Conversion and peaceful end of Tuglavina.—Last days of Mikak.—Indians come to Hopedale.—[v] Rose's remarks on the internal state of the missions.—Instances of the power of grace among the Esquimaux—striking observation of one of the baptized.—Jonathan's letter to the Greenlanders.—Affecting confession of Solomon.—Conduct of a young woman sought in marriage by a heathen.—State of the settlements at the close of the century.—Prospects begin to brighten.—Remarkable phenomenon.—Avocations of the missionaries—their trials—preservation of their vessels—of their settlements—their brotherly love. 154
CHAPTER V.  
  Variable appearances of the mission at Nain and Okkak—more favourable at Hopedale.—Death of Benjamin.—Spirit of love among the converted.—Happy communion and close of the year.—Providential escape of the Resolution.—New epoch in Labrador.—A remarkable awakening commences at Hopedale—meetings—schools.—Letter from a converted Esquimaux to his teacher.—Industry of the awakened.—Declension of religion at Nain and Okkak.—State of the children at Hopedale.—Progress of the adults in knowledge, love, and zeal—instances.—Striking conversion of two young Esquimaux, its effects upon their countrymen.—Awakening spreads to Nain and to Okkak.—Zeal of the converts towards the heathen rouses backsliders.—Behaviour of the awakened in sickness, and the prospect of death.—Remarkable accessions from the heathen.—The son of a sorcerer. 201
CHAPTER VI.  
  Mutual affection of the Christian Esquimaux and Greenlanders—their correspondence—letter from Timothy, a baptized Greenlander.—Delight of the Esquimaux in religious exercises.—Order of the congregations—distressing events, apostasy of Kapik—awful end of Jacob—peaceful end of believers—Judith, Joanna.—Revival among the communicants.—A feast by a Christian brother to the Esquimaux.—Winter arrangements.—Childrens' meetings—schools.—The brethren's settlements contrasted with the heathen.—Progress of religion[vi] at the different stations.—Books printed in the Esquimaux language.—Number of the settled Esquimaux.—Epidemic at Nain—its consequences.—General view of the mission. 238
CHAPTER VII.  
  Desire of the heathen to hear the Gospel.—Brethren meditate a new settlement—voyage to explore the country.—Quiet course of the mission—advantages of their church discipline.—Death of Burghardt.—Exertions of the aged survivors.—Schreiber, superintendant, arrives.—Anxiety of the native Christians to attend the ordinances of religion.—Advantages of the Bible as a school-book.—Four missionaries unexpectedly carried to England.—Baptized Esquimaux seduced by traders.—Perilous voyage of the returning missionaries—striking accident.—Schreiber retires from the superintendance—Kohlmeister succeeds—his journeyings to Okkak, to Nain.—Stability of the work of God at Nain—hopeful deaths—conversion and recovery of a young native.—Remarkable preservation of an Esquimaux youth. 269
CHAPTER VIII.  
  Fiftieth anniversary of the missionary
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