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Clotelle; Or, The Colored Heroine, a tale of the Southern States; Or, The President's Daughter

Clotelle; Or, The Colored Heroine, a tale of the Southern States; Or, The President's Daughter
Title: Clotelle; Or, The Colored Heroine, a tale of the Southern States; Or, The President's Daughter
Release Date: 2008-07-02
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 24 March 2019
Count views: 102
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CLOTELLE; OR, THE COLORED HEROINE.

A TALE OF THE SOUTHERN STATES.


By William Wells Brown


CONTENTS


CLOTELLE

CHAPTER I.   THE SOUTHERN SOCIAL CIRCLE
CHAPTER II.   THE NEGRO SALE
CHAPTER III.   THE SLAVE-SPECULATOR
CHAPTER IV.   THE BOAT-RACE
CHAPTER V.   THE YOUNG MOTHER
CHAPTER VI.   THE SLAVE-MARKET.
CHAPTER VII.   THE SLAVE-HOLDING PARSON
CHAPTER VIII.   A NIGHT IN THE PARSON'S KITCHEN
CHAPTER IX.   THE MAN OF HONOR
CHAPTER X.   THE QUADROON'S HOME
CHAPTER XI.   TO-DAY A MISTRESS, TO-MORROW A SLAVE
CHAPTER XII.   THE MOTHER-IN-LAW
CHAPTER XIII.   A HARD-HEARTED WOMAN
CHAPTER XIV.   THE PRISON
CHAPTER XV.   THE ARREST
CHAPTER XVI.   DEATH IS FREEDOM
CHAPTER XVII.   CLOTELLE
CHAPTER XVIII.   A SLAVE-HUNTING PARSON
CHAPTER XIX.   THE TRUE HEROINE
CHAPTER XX.   THE HERO OF MANY ADVENTURES
CHAPTER XXI.   SELF-SACRIFICE
CHAPTER XXII.   LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT AND WHAT FOLLOWED
CHAPTER XXIII.   MEETING OF THE COUSINS
CHAPTER XXIV.   THE LAW AND ITS VICTIM
CHAPTER XXV.   THE FLIGHT
CHAPTER XXVI.   THE HERO OF A NIGHT
CHAPTER XXVII.   TRUE FREEDOM
CHAPTER XXVIII.   FAREWELL TO AMERICA
CHAPTER XXIX.   A STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND
CHAPTER XXX.   NEW FRIENDS
CHAPTER XXXI.   THE MYSTERIOUS MEETING
CHAPTER XXXII.   THE HAPPY MEETING
CHAPTER XXXIII.   THE HAPPY DAY
CHAPTER XXXIV.   CLOTELLE MEETS HER FATHER.
CHAPTER XXXV.   THE FATHER'S RESOLVE
CHAPTER XXXVI.   THE RETURN HOME
CHAPTER XXXVII.   THE ANGEL OF MERCY
CHAPTER XXXVIII.     THE GREAT TUNNEL AND THE MISTAKE
CHAPTER XXXIX.   CONCLUSION




CLOTELLE



CHAPTER I. THE SOUTHERN SOCIAL CIRCLE

FOR many years the South has been noted for its beautiful Quadroon women. Bottles of ink, and reams of paper, have been used to portray the “finely-cut and well-moulded features,” the “silken curls,” the “dark and brilliant eyes,” the “splendid forms,” the “fascinating smiles,” and “accomplished manners” of these impassioned and voluptuous daughters of the two races,—the unlawful product of the crime of human bondage. When we take into consideration the fact that no safeguard was ever thrown around virtue, and no inducement held out to slave-women to be pure and chaste, we will not be surprised when told that immorality pervades the domestic circle in the cities and towns of the South to an extent unknown in the Northern States. Many a planter's wife has dragged out a miserable existence, with an aching heart, at seeing her place in the husband's affections usurped by the unadorned beauty and captivating smiles of her waiting-maid. Indeed, the greater portion of the colored women, in the days of slavery, had no greater aspiration than that of becoming the finely-dressed mistress of some white man. At the negro balls and parties, that used to be so frequently given, this class of women generally made the most splendid appearance.

A few years ago, among the many slave-women of Richmond, Va., who hired their time of their masters, was Agnes, a mulatto owned by John Graves, Esq., and who might be heard boasting that she was the daughter of an American Senator. Although nearly forty years of age at the time of which we write, Agnes was still exceedingly handsome. More than half white, with long black hair and deep blue eyes, no one felt like disputing with her when she urged her claim to her relationship with the Anglo-Saxon. In her younger days, Agnes had been a housekeeper for a young slave-holder, and in sustaining this relation had become the mother of two daughters. After being cast aside by this young man, the slave-woman betook herself to the business of a laundress, and was considered to be the most tasteful woman in Richmond at her vocation.

Isabella and Marion, the two daughters of Agnes, resided with their mother, and gave her what aid they could in her business. The mother, however, was very choice of her daughters, and would allow them to perform no labor that would militate against their lady-like appearance. Agnes early resolved to bring up her daughters as ladies, as she termed it.

As the girls grew older, the mother had to pay a stipulated price for them per month. Her notoriety as a laundress of the first class enabled her to put an extra charge upon the linen that passed through her hands; and although she imposed little or no work upon her daughters, she was enabled to live in comparative luxury and have her daughters dressed to attract attention, especially at the negro balls and parties.

Although the term “negro ball” is applied to these gatherings, yet a large portion of the men who attend them are whites. Negro balls and parties in the Southern States, especially in the cities and towns, are usually made up of quadroon women, a few negro men, and any number of white gentlemen. These are gatherings of the most democratic character. Bankers, merchants, lawyers, doctors, and their clerks and students, all take part in these social assemblies upon terms of perfect equality. The father and son not unfrequently meet and dance vis a vis at a negro ball.

It was at one of these parties that Henry Linwood, the son of a wealthy and retired gentleman of Richmond, was first introduced to Isabella, the oldest daughter of Agnes. The young man had just returned from Harvard College, where he had spent the previous five years. Isabella was in her eighteenth year, and was admitted by all who knew her to be the handsomest girl, colored or white, in the city. On this occasion, she was attired in a sky-blue silk dress, with deep black lace flounces, and bertha of the same. On her well-moulded arms she wore massive gold bracelets, while her rich black hair was arranged at the back in broad basket plaits, ornamented with pearls, and the front in the French

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