A Journey into the Interior of the Earth

A Journey into the Interior of the Earth
Author: Verne Jules
Title: A Journey into the Interior of the Earth
Release Date: 2003-02-01
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 24 March 2019
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Project Gutenberg's A Journey to the Interior of the Earth, by Jules Verne

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: A Journey to the Interior of the Earth

Author: Jules Verne

Posting Date: December 3, 2010 [EBook #3748]Release Date: February, 2003[Last updated: August 19, 2011]

Language: English

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A JOURNEY TO THE INTERIOR ***

Produced by Norman M. Wolcott.

A Journey into the Interior of the Earth

by Jules Verne

[Redactor's Note: The following version of Jules Verne's "Journeyinto the Interior of the Earth" was published by Ward, Lock, &Co.,Ltd., London, in 1877. This version is believed to be the mostfaithful rendition into English of this classic currently in thepublic domain. The few notes of the translator are located near thepoint where they are referenced. The Runic characters in Chapter IIIare visible in the HTML version of the text. The character set isISO-8891-1, mainly the Windows character set. The translation is byFrederick Amadeus Malleson.

While the translation is fairly literal, and Malleson (a clergyman)has taken pains with the scientific portions of the work and addedthe chapter headings, he has made some unfortunate emendations mainlyconcerning biblical references, and has added a few 'improvements' ofhis own, which are detailed below:

III. "pertubata seu inordinata," as Euclid has it."

XXX. cry, "Thalatta! thalatta!" the sea! the sea! The deeply indentedshore was lined with a breadth of fine shining sand, softly

XXXII. hippopotamus. {as if the creator, pressed for time in thefirst hours of the world, had assembled several animals into one.}The colossal mastodon

XXXII. I return to the scriptural periods or ages of the world,conventionally called 'days,' long before the appearance of man whenthe unfinished world was as yet unfitted for his support. {I returnto the biblical epochs of the creation, well in advance of the birthof man, when the incomplete earth was not yet sufficient for him.}

XXXVIII. (footnote), and which is illustrated in the negrocountenance and in the lowest savages.

XXXIX. of the geologic period. {antediluvian}

(These corrections have kindly been pointed out by Christian Sánchez<[email protected]> of the Jules Verne Forum.)]

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A JOURNEY
INTO THE
INTERIOR OF THE EARTH

by

Jules Verne

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PREFACE

THE "Voyages Extraordinaires" of M. Jules Verne deserve to be madewidely known in English-speaking countries by means of carefullyprepared translations. Witty and ingenious adaptations of theresearches and discoveries of modern science to the popular taste,which demands that these should be presented to ordinary readers inthe lighter form of cleverly mingled truth and fiction, these bookswill assuredly be read with profit and delight, especially by Englishyouth. Certainly no writer before M. Jules Verne has been so happy inweaving together in judicious combination severe scientific truthwith a charming exercise of playful imagination.

Iceland, the starting point of the marvellous underground journeyimagined in this volume, is invested at the present time with apainful interest in consequence of the disastrous eruptions lastEaster Day, which covered with lava and ashes the poor and scantyvegetation upon which four thousand persons were partly dependent forthe means of subsistence. For a long time to come the natives of thatinteresting island, who cleave to their desert home with all thatamor patriae which is so much more easily understood thanexplained, will look, and look not in vain, for the help of those onwhom fall the smiles of a kindlier sun in regions not torn byearthquakes nor blasted and ravaged by volcanic fires. Will thereaders of this little book, who, are gifted with the means ofindulging in the luxury of extended beneficence, remember thedistress of their brethren in the far north, whom distance has notbarred from the claim of being counted our "neighbours"? And whatevertheir humane feelings may prompt them to bestow will be gladly addedto the Mansion-House Iceland Relief Fund.

In his desire to ascertain how far the picture of Iceland, drawn inthe work of Jules Verne is a correct one, the translator hopes in thecourse of a mail or two to receive a communication from a leading manof science in the island, which may furnish matter for additionalinformation in a future edition.

The scientific portion of the French original is not without a fewerrors, which the translator, with the kind assistance of Mr. Cameronof H. M. Geological Survey, has ventured to point out and correct. Itis scarcely to be expected in a work in which the element ofamusement is intended to enter more largely than that of scientificinstruction, that any great degree of accuracy should be arrived at.Yet the translator hopes that what trifling deviations from the textor corrections in foot notes he is responsible for, will have done alittle towards the increased usefulness of the work.

F. A. M.

The Vicarage,

Broughton-in-Furness

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CONTENTS

I THE PROFESSOR AND HIS FAMILY II A MYSTERY TO BE SOLVED AT ANY PRICE III THE RUNIC WRITING EXERCISES THE PROFESSOR IV THE ENEMY TO BE STARVED INTO SUBMISSION V FAMINE, THEN VICTORY, FOLLOWED BY DISMAY VI EXCITING DISCUSSIONS ABOUT AN UNPARALLELED EXERCISE VII A WOMAN'S COURAGE VIII SERIOUS PREPARATIONS FOR VERTICAL DESCENT IX ICELAND, BUT WHAT NEXT? X INTERESTING CONVERSATIONS WITH ICELANDIC SAVANTS XI A GUIDE FOUND TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH XII A BARREN LAND XIII HOSPITALITY UNDER THE ARCTIC CIRCLE XIV BUT ARCTICS CAN BE INHOSPITABLE, TOO XV SNÆFFEL AT LAST XVI BOLDLY DOWN THE CRATER XVII VERTICAL DESCENT XVIII THE WONDERS OF TERRESTIAL DEPTHS XIX GEOLOGICAL STUDIES IN SITU XX THE FIRST SIGNS OF DISTRESS XXI COMPASSION FUSES THE PROFESSOR'S HEART XXII TOTAL FAILURE OF WATER XXIII WATER DISCOVERED XXIV WELL SAID, OLD MOLE! CANST THOU WORK IN THE GROUND SO FAST? XXV DE PROFUNDIS XXVI THE WORST PERIL OF ALL XXVII LOST IN THE BOWELS OF THE EARTH XXVIII THE RESCUE IN THE WHISPERING GALLERY XXIX THALATTA! THALATTA! XXX A NEW MARE INTERNUM XXXI PREPARATIONS FOR A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY XXXII WONDERS OF THE DEEP XXXIII A BATTLE OF MONSTERS XXXIV THE GREAT GEYSER XXXV AN ELECTRIC STORM XXXVI CALM PHILOSOPHIC DISCUSSIONS XXXVII THE LIEDENBROCK MUSEUM OF GEOLOGY XXXVIII THE PROFESSOR IN HIS CHAIR AGAIN XXXIX FOREST SCENERY ILLUMINATED BY ELECTRICITY XL PREPARATIONS FOR BLASTING A PASSAGE TO THE CENTRE OF THE EARTH XLI THE GREAT EXPLOSION AND THE RUSH DOWN BELOW XLII HEADLONG SPEED UPWARD THROUGH THE HORRORS OF DARKNESS XLIII SHOT OUT OF A VOLCANO AT LAST! XLIV SUNNY LANDS IN THE BLUE MEDITERRANEAN XLV ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

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A JOURNEY INTO THE INTERIOR OF THE EARTH

CHAPTER I.

THE PROFESSOR AND HIS FAMILY

On the 24th of May, 1863, my uncle, Professor Liedenbrock, rushedinto his little house, No. 19 Königstrasse, one of the oldest streetsin the oldest portion of the city of Hamburg.

Martha must have concluded that she was very much behindhand, for thedinner had only just been put into the oven.

"Well, now," said I to myself, "if that most impatient of men ishungry, what a disturbance he will make!"

"M. Liedenbrock so soon!" cried poor Martha in great alarm, halfopening the dining-room door.

"Yes, Martha; but very likely the dinner is not half cooked, for itis not two yet. Saint Michael's clock has only just struck half-pastone."

"Then why has the master come home so soon?"

"Perhaps he will tell us that himself."

"Here he is, Monsieur Axel; I will run and hide myself while youargue with him."

And Martha retreated in safety into her own dominions.

I was left alone. But how was it possible for a man of my undecidedturn of mind to argue successfully with so irascible a person as theProfessor? With this persuasion I was hurrying away to my own littleretreat upstairs, when the street door creaked upon its hinges; heavyfeet made the whole flight of stairs to shake; and the master of thehouse, passing rapidly through the dining-room, threw himself inhaste into his own sanctum.

But on his rapid way he had found time to fling his hazel stick intoa corner, his rough broadbrim upon the table, and these few emphaticwords at his nephew:

"Axel, follow me!"

I had scarcely had time to move when the Professor was again shoutingafter me:

"What! not come yet?"

And I rushed into my redoubtable master's study.

Otto Liedenbrock had no mischief in him, I willingly allow that; butunless he very considerably

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