The Ranche on the Oxhide_ A Story of Boys' and Girls' Life on the Frontier

The Ranche on the Oxhide_ A Story of Boys' and Girls' Life on the Frontier
Author: Inman Henry
Title: The Ranche on the Oxhide_ A Story of Boys' and Girls' Life on the Frontier
Release Date: 2012-08-24
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 26 March 2019
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Ranche on the Oxhide, by Henry Inman,Illustrated by Charles Bradford Hudson

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: The Ranche on the Oxhide

A Story of Boys' and Girls' Life on the Frontier

Author: Henry Inman

Release Date: August 24, 2012 [eBook #40574]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE RANCHE ON THE OXHIDE***

 

E-text prepared by David Edwards, Emmy,
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Cover: The Ranche on the Oxide, Boy Scout Library emblem, Henry Inman

Letter-page1
Second page of letter
Transcriber's Notes: To see a larger version of the pages of this letter,click on the images.

July 31st, 1913.
TO THE PUBLIC:—

In the execution of its purpose to give educational value andmoral worth to the recreational activities of the boyhood of America,the leaders of the Boy Scout Movement quickly learned that to effectivelycarry out its program, the boy must be influenced not only in his out-of-doorlife but also in the diversions of his other leisure moments.It is at such times that the boy is captured by the tales of daringenterprises and adventurous good times. What now is needful is notthat his taste should be thwarted but trained. There should constantlybe presented to him the books the boy likes best, yet always the booksthat will be best for the boy. As a matter of fact, however, the boy'staste is being constantly vitiated and exploited by the great mass ofcheap juvenile literature.

To help anxiously concerned parents and educators to meet thisgrave peril, the Library Commission of the Boy Scouts of America hasbeen organised. EVERY BOY'S LIBRARY is the result of their labors.All the books chosen have been approved by them. The Commission iscomposed of the following members: George F. Bowerman, Librarian, PublicLibrary of the District of Columbia, Washington, D. C.; Harrison W.Graver, Librarian, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Pa.; Claude G. Leland,Superintendent, Bureau of Libraries, Board of Education, New York City:Edward F. Stevens, Librarian, Pratt Institute Free Library, Brooklyn,New York; together with the Editorial Board of our Movement WilliamD. Murray, George D. Pratt and Frank Presbrey, with Franklin K. Mathiews,Chief Scout Librarian, as Secretary.

"DO A GOOD TURN DAILY."

In selecting the books, the Commission has chosen only such asare of interest to boys, the first twenty-five being either works offiction or stirring stories of adventurous experiences. In later lists,books of a more serious sort will be included. It is hoped that asmany as twenty-five may be added to the Library each year.

Thanks are due the several publishers who have helped toinaugurate this new department of our work. Without their co-operationin making available for popular priced editions some of the best booksever published for boys, the promotion of EVERY BOY'S LIBRARY wouldhave been impossible.

We wish, too, to express our heartiest gratitude to the LibraryCommission, who, without compensation, have placed their vast experienceand immense resources at the service of our Movement.

The Commission invites suggestions as to future books to beincluded in the Library. Librarians, teachers, parents, and all othersinterested in welfare work for boys, can render a unique service byforwarding to National Headquarters lists of such books as in theirjudgment would be suitable for EVERY BOY'S LIBRARY.

Signed
Signature: James E. West
Chief Scout Executive.

THE RANCHE ON THE OXHIDE


Dancing around the campfire"The most indescribable antics were gone through."
Page 290.                 Frontispiece.

EVERY BOY'S LIBRARY—BOY SCOUT EDITION

THE RANCHE ON
THE OXHIDE

A Story of Boys' and Girls' Lifeon the Frontier

BY
HENRY INMAN
LATE CAPTAIN UNITED STATES ARMY
BREVET LIEUTENANT COLONEL
AUTHOR OF
THE OLD SANTA F TRAIL
Illustrated by
Charles Bradford Hudson

emblem: torch


NEW YORK
GROSSET & DUNLAP
PUBLISHERS
(Macmillan's Standard Library)


To My Grandson
GEORGE INMAN SEITZ

[vii]

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I
TAKING UP A "CLAIM" IN KANSAS—THE TRAIL FROM LEAVENWORTH—ANIMALSSEEN EN ROUTE—PRAIRIE CHICKENS—BUILDINGTHE CABIN—THE COSY SITTING-ROOM—ANIMALSFOUND IN THE TIMBER AND ON THE PRAIRIE—WHY THECREEK WAS NAMED "OXHIDE"           Page 1

CHAPTER II
THE HOUSE IS FINISHED—BUILDING CORRALS—THE HOUNDS—THEIRFIGHT WITH A LYNX—ITS HIDE GIVEN TO GERTRUDE—THEIMMENSE HERD OF BUFFALO—CAPTURE FOUR CALVES—GETTHEIR PONIES IN A STRANGE MANNER—BREAKINGTHEM           Page 13

CHAPTER III
THE BOYS GO FISHING FOR THE FIRST TIME—AN IDEA SUDDENLYSTRIKES ROB—ROB'S QUEST AND LUCK—THE ISLANDOF WILLOWS—ROB'S BIG CAT—JOE'S TUSSLE WITH A PANTHERCUB—KILLS HIM—IS WOUNDED—SKINS THE ANIMAL, ANDGETS HOME AT LAST—GIVES THE BEAUTIFUL ROBE TO HISMOTHER           Page 29

CHAPTER IV
BOY AND GIRL LIFE AT ERROLSTRATH RANCHE—THEIR PETS—THEGIRLS ENCOUNTER A BIG PRAIRIE WOLF—JOE TO THERESCUE—DEATH OF THE FEROCIOUS BEAST           Page 48

[viii]


CHAPTER V
THE FRIENDLY PAWNEES CAMP ON THE OXHIDE—OLD "YELLOWCALF," THE CHIEF—JOE IS NAMED "THE WHITE PANTHER"—JOEGOES HUNTING WITH THE BAND—HE LEARNS THELANGUAGE—HUNTING WITH THE BOYS OF THE TRIBE           Page 62

CHAPTER VI
THE STORY OF THE MASSACRE ON SPILLMAN CREEK—SCOUTS GOTO THE RESCUE—JOE AND ROB TALK OVER THE HORRIDWORK OF THE SAVAGES—THE DOG SOLDIERS—CHARLEYBENT—PLACE OF RENDEZVOUS—PARTY STARTS OUT—JOE'SOPINION IS ASKED           Page 71

CHAPTER VII
ARRIVAL OF CAVALRY ON THE ELKHORN—A DEER HUNT—WHATTHE SCOUTS SAW—THE STORY OF THE TWO LITTLEGIRLS—THE DEAD AND WOUNDED—MEN HIDDEN IN THEBRUSH—AN INDIAN LEGEND—ARRIVAL OF THE INFANTRY—THEDEER HUNT IN THE MORNING—DEATH OF THE DEER           Page 98

CHAPTER VIII
MR. TUCKER PASSES THE NIGHT AT ERROLSTRATH—HE TELLS SOMESTORIES OF HUNTING BIG GAME IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS—SAGACITYOF THE FEMALE BIGHORN—THE AMERICAN COUGAR—THEBEAR AND THE PANTHER—THE RABBIT HUNT—HOWTHE BOYS TRAINED THEIR HOUNDS           Page 118

[ix]


CHAPTER IX
INDIAN RAIDS—KATE IS MISSING—"BUFFALO BILL'S" OPINION—"BUFFALOBILL" FINDS HER LITTLE BASKET—THE SOLDIERSRETURN TO THE FORT WITHOUT FINDING HER—GRIEF OF THEFAMILY           Page 137

CHAPTER X
HOW KATE WAS CAPTURED BY THE INDIANS—THE BAND RIDERAPIDLY SOUTHWARD—AT THE INDIAN VILLAGE—HER DETERMINATIONTO ESCAPE—TEACHES THE SQUAWS—ISTREATED KINDLY           Page 147

CHAPTER XI
THANKSGIVING DAY AT ERROLSTRATH—KATE'S RETURN—CUSTER'SBATTLE WITH "BLACK KETTLE"—KATE TELLS HERSTORY—THE ORIGIN OF INDIAN CORN—A WOLF HUNT WITHGENERAL CUSTER—A WOLF STORY BY THE COLONEL           Page 156

CHAPTER XII
A WOLF HUNT—TWO SNAKE STORIES—TERRIBLE STRUGGLE WITHA MOUNTAIN WOLF—A MAIL RIDER EATEN—THE OLD TRAPPER'SEXPERIENCE WITH FOUR OF THE FIERCE BEASTS           Page 193

CHAPTER XIII
JOE, ROB, AND THE OLD TRAPPER—GENERAL CUSTER ARRIVES ATTHE RENDEZVOUS—THE WOLF DENS—FIRST TUSSLE BETWEENTHE HOUNDS AND A WOLF—CINCH'S GREAT BATTLE           Page 211

[x]


CHAPTER XIV
A WILD TURKEY HUNT—THE TRIP TO MUD CREEK—THE TURKEYROOST—THE SHOOTING BEGINS—COUNTING THE NUMBERKILLED—JOE SELLS TURKEYS           Page 222

CHAPTER XV
HOW THE ROBIN CAME TO KANSAS—MOCKING-BIRDS—EATEN BYSNAKES—JOE LOSES HIS TAME ELK—THE LAST OF THEWOLVES—FINDING THE QUAIL'S NEST—JOE BUILDS A CAGEFOR THEM—RAISING CHICKENS           Page 229

CHAPTER XVI
THE PAWNEES RETURN—ANTELOPE HUNT WITH THE INDIANS—JOEMISSES—WHITE WOLF—TALK OF A WILD HORSE HUNT—THESAND-HILL CRANES—THEIR WEIRD COTILLION           Page 246

CHAPTER XVII
WILD HORSES—JOE SLEEPS IN WHITE WOLF'S TENT—CAMPON THE WALNUT—WOLVES AND LYNXES—KILL AN ELK—THECHASE—CAPTURE OF THE BLACK STALLION—WHITEWOLF'S SKILL—BREAKING THE HORSES           Page 256

CHAPTER XVIII
THE LAST HERD OF BUFFALO—THE STAMPEDE—THE SOLDIERSIN FULL CHASE—JOE GETS TWO COWS—HAULING IN THEMEAT—RATTLESNAKES           Page 272

[xi]


CHAPTER XIX
THE INDIAN HORSE-RACE—KATE'S PONY WINS—THE TRADE WITHTHE PAWNEES—THE DANCES AT NIGHT—THE INDIANS SAYGOOD BY TO THE FAMILY—NOBLE ACTION OF WHITE WOLF           Page 281

CHAPTER XXM
CONCLUSION
RETROSPECTIVE—THE OLD TRAPPER PASSES AWAY—MR. ANDMRS. THOMPSON ARE DEAD—GENERAL CUSTER AND COLONELKEOGH ARE KILLED—ERROLSTRATH BELONGS TO JOE ANDROB           Page 295

[1]

THE RANCHE ON THE OXHIDE

decorative divider

CHAPTER I

TAKING UP A "CLAIM" IN KANSAS—THE TRAIL FROM LEAVENWORTH—ANIMALSSEEN EN ROUTE—PRAIRIE CHICKENS—BUILDINGTHE CABIN—THE COSY SITTING-ROOM—ANIMALSFOUND IN THE TIMBER AND ON THE PRAIRIE—WHY THECREEK WAS NAMED "OXHIDE"

In 1865-66, immigrants began to rush intothe new state of Kansas which had just beenadmitted into the Union. A large majorityof the early settlers were old soldiers who hadserved faithfully during the war for the preservationof their country. To these veterans theGovernment, by Act of Congress, made certainconcessions, whereby they could take up"claims" of a hundred and sixty acres of thepublic land under easier regulations than othercitizens who had not helped their country inthe hour of her extreme danger.

[2]

Many of them, however, were forced to goout on the extreme frontier, as the eastern portionof the state was already well settled. Onthe remote border several tribes of Indians,notably the Cheyennes, Kiowas, Comanches,and Arapahoes, still held almost undisputedpossession, and they were violently opposed tothe white man's encroachment upon their ancestralhunting-grounds, from which he droveaway the big game upon which they dependedfor the subsistence of themselves and their families.Consequently, these savages became veryhostile as they witnessed, day after day, the arrivalof hundreds of white settlers who squattedon the best land, felled the trees on the marginof the streams to build their log-cabins, andploughed up the ground to plant crops.

Late in the fall of 1866, Robert Thompson,a veteran of one of the Vermont regiments, havingread in his village newspaper such glowingaccounts of the advantages offered by Kansasto the immigrant, decided to leave his ancestralhomestead among the barren hills of the GreenMountain State, and take up a claim in the farWest. The family, consisting of father, mother,[3]Joseph, Robert, Gertrude, and Kate, after a

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