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The Prince of the House of David

The Prince of the House of David
Title: The Prince of the House of David
Release Date: 2016-12-23
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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New Sabbath Library.Vol. 1. No. 7. October, 1898.
Monthly, 60 cents per year.
Single Copy, 5 Cents.

The Prince of the
House of David

By

Rev J. H. Ingraham


DAVID C. COOK Publishing Co.
36 WASHINGTON ST. CHICAGO ELGIN ILL

[Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, Ill., as Second Class Mail Matter.]


Famous Books at Popular Prices

The New Sabbath Library.
A MONTHLY PUBLICATION.

Subscription Price, 60 Cents a Year. Single Copies, 5 Cents.


Titus: a Comrade of the Cross
The Wrestler of Philippi

To meet the growing demand for pure literature at popularprices, we began in April, 1898, the issue of a monthly publicationentitled the New Sabbath Library. Thesuccess of these issues has proved to be unprecedented, andthey have attained an almost world-wide celebrity. Althoughappealing particularly to young people, they will interest alllovers of good and wholesome literature, whether young or old.

Each issue of the New Sabbath Library contains acomplete story, most of them written expressly for us and copyrighted.The books are of uniform style and size (68), eachcontaining 96 large pages in double column. They are in large,clear type, handsomely printed on good book paper, and fullyillustrated with fine half-tone engravings. The covers are ofheavy, white enameled paper, with beautifully engraved designs.

Prices.—Those who wish to procure this Library regularly, as it is published each month, may remit 60cents for a year's subscription, being particular to state with which issue the subscription is to commence.Single copies may be ordered of any or all of the books at the rate of 5 cents each, or any number of copies ofany one book will be sent at same rate. We prepay postage.

Cloth Editions.—We have also prepared special editions of all these books, printed on very heavy paper,beautifully bound in heavy covers, cloth backs and corners, ornamented sides. They are specially adapted forpresentation purposes, and are the largest and best books ever offered for so low a price. Sent postpaid to anyaddress, in any quantities desired, on receipt of price, 25 cents per copy.

Following is a list of books already issued, or about to be issued:

No. 1. April, 1898.

A Devotee and a Darling

By BECCA MIDDLETON SAMSON.

This book received the second prize of $500 frommanuscripts submitted to the publishers in competitionduring the year 1897.

Fannie, an impulsive girl of sixteen, bereft of hermother, becomes devotedly attached to Church workand to the study of her Bible. She makes manyblunders and is severely tried at home. At last, in amanner both strange and startling, Fannie's eyes areopened to see her own mistaken life.

No. 3. June, 1898.

Titus: a Comrade of the Cross

By FLORENCE M. KINGSLEY.

The publishers of this book, desiring to secure a lifeof Christ of superior merit and special character, offereda prize of $1,000 for the best manuscript submitted.The committee decided in favor of "Titus." It was animmediate success, over one million copies havingbeen sold. It is one of the grandest books of thecentury, and has attracted greater attention thanany other book published in this country during thepast twenty years.

No. 2. May, 1898.

The Wrestler of Philippi

By FANNIE E. NEWBERRY.

A tale of the times of the early followers of Jesus, andhow they lived the "Christ-life" in the first century.As "Titus" gave the reader a picture of the life andtimes of Christ, so this book is intended to portray thelife and times of the early Church.

The plot is fascinating—a story for both young andold. Its Oriental setting, description of quaint customs,manners, beliefs, etc., give it a peculiar interest andattractiveness all its own.

No. 4. July, 1898.

Out of the Triangle

By MARY E. BAMFORD.

This is a story of the days of persecution of Christiansunder the Emperor Septimius Severus. Thescene is mainly laid in Alexandria and the LibyanDesert. The Egyptian gods were worshiped under theform of a small triangular stone. The book relates in avivid and intensely interesting manner the narrowescapes of an Egyptian lad who has become a Christian,and the manner in which his family accept hisfaith and escape from Alexandria.

(CONTINUED ON THIRD PAGE COVER)


The Prince of the House of David.

By REV. J. H. INGRAHAM.


Copyright, 1898, by David C. Cook Publishing Company.

David C. Cook Publishing Company, Elgin, Ill., and 36 Washington St., Chicago.


CONTENTS

PREFACE.
LETTER I.
LETTER II.
LETTER III.
LETTER IV.
LETTER V.
LETTER VI.
LETTER VII.
LETTER VIII.
LETTER IX.
LETTER X.
LETTER XI.
LETTER XII.
LETTER XIII.
LETTER XIV.
LETTER XV.
LETTER XVI.
LETTER XVII.
LETTER XVIII.
LETTER XIX.
LETTER XX.
LETTER XXI.
LETTER XXII.
LETTER XXIII.
LETTER XXIV.
LETTER XXV.
LETTER XXVI.
LETTER XXVII.
LETTER XXVIII.
LETTER XXIX.
LETTER XXX.
LETTER XXXI.
LETTER XXXII.
LETTER XXXIII.
LETTER XXXIV.
LETTER XXXV.
LETTER XXXVI.
LETTER XXXVII.
LETTER XXXVIII.
LETTER XXXIX.


PREFACE.

The "Prince of the House of David," writtenby Rev. Mr. Ingraham, needs no recommendation.Its fame has been, long since, established,and its fascination has alreadyheld sway over multitudes of delightedreaders. Recognizing fully its merits, thepublishers of this edition decided to put it inthe way of a still greater circulation; and inorder to facilitate this, it has been thoroughlyrevised and in parts re-written, allunnecessary repetition appearing in theoriginal edition of the book being omitted.

Adina, the suppositious writer of the followingletters, is the daughter of a Jew whoresides in Alexandria, Egypt. She has cometo Jerusalem during the most stirring periodof earth's history, and, from thence, for theperiod of three years, she keeps her fatherapprized of the marvelous events occurringabout her during that time.

THE PUBLISHERS.


LETTERS FROM ADINA.


LETTER I.

My Dear Father:

My first duty, as it is my highest pleasure,is to comply with your command to writeyou as soon as I should arrive at Jerusalem,and this letter, while it conveys intelligenceof my arrival, will confirm to youmy filial obedience.

My journey hither occupied many days.When we traveled in sight of the sea, whichwe did for three days, I enjoyed the majestyof the prospect, it seemed so like the skystretched out upon the earth. I also had thegood fortune to see several ships, which theRabbi informed me were Roman galleys,bound some to Sidon, and others into theNile; and after one of these latter, as it wasgoing to you, I sent a prayer and a wish.Just as we were leaving the sea-shore toturn off into the desert, I saw a wrecked vessel.It looked so helpless and bulky, withits huge black body all out of the water,that it seemed to me like a great sea-monster,stranded and dying; and I felt likepitying it. How terrible a tempest must beupon the sea! I was in hopes to have seen aLeviathan, but was not gratified in thewish. The good Rabbi, who seemed to knowall about these things, told me that they seldomappear now in the Middle Sea, but areseen beyond the pillar of Hercules at theworld's end.

At Gaza we stopped two days, and fromthence we proceeded over-land to our destination.

The morning of the last day of our journeybut one, having lost our way and wanderedmany hours eastwardly, we caught sight ofthe Sea of Sodom and Gomorrah, at a greatdistance to the east. How my pulse quickenedat beholding that fearful spot! I seemedto see in imagination the heavens on fireabove it, and the flames and smoke ascendingas from a great furnace, as on that fearfulday when they were destroyed, with allthat beautiful surrounding plain, which weare told was one vast garden of beauty.How calm and still lay now that sluggishsea beneath a cloudless sky! We held it insight many hours, and once caught a glimpseof the Jordan north of it, looking like a silverthread; yet near as it appeared to be, Iwas told it was a good day's journey for acamel to reach its shores.

After losing sight of this melancholy lake,our way lay along a narrow valley for sometime, and the next day, on reaching an[Pg 2]eminence, Jerusalem appeared, as if risenout of the earth.

I cannot, my dear father, describe to youmy emotions on beholding the Holy City!They have been experienced by millions ofour people—they were similar to your ownas you related them to me. All the past,with its mighty men who walked with Jehovah,rushed to my memory, and compelledme to bow my head, and worship and adoreat the sight of the Temple, where God once(alas, why does he no longer visit earth andhis holy house?) dwelt in the flamingShechinah, and made known the oracles ofhis will.

We entered the city just before the sixthhour of the evening, and were soon at thehouse of our relative, Amos, the Levite. Iwas received as if I had a daughter's claimto their embraces; and with the luxurieswith which they surrounded me in mygorgeously furnished apartments. I am suremy kinsfolk here mean to tempt me to forgetthe joys of the dear home I have left.

The Rabbi Amos and his family all desireto be commended to you. He seems to be aman of piety and benevolence, and greatlyloves his children. I have been once tothe Temple. Its outer court seemed likea vast caravanserai or market-place, beingthronged with the men who sell animalsfor sacrifice, which crowded all parts.Thousands of doves in large cages weresold on one side, and on another werestalls for lambs, sheep, calves and oxen,the noise and bleating of which, withthe confusion of tongues, made the placeappear like anything else than the Templeof Jehovah. It appears like desecrationto use the Temple thus, dear father,and seems to show a want of that holy loveof God's house that once characterized ourancestors. On reaching the women's courtI was sensible of being in the Temple, bythe magnificence which surrounded me.With what awe I bowed my head in thedirection of the Holy of Holies! I neverfelt before so near to God! Clouds of incensefloated above the heads of the multitude,and rivers of blood flowed down themarble steps of the altar of burnt offering.Alas! how many innocent victims bleedevery morning and evening for the sins ofIsrael! What a sea of blood has been pouredout in ages that have passed! What astrange, fearful mystery, that the blood of aninnocent lamb should atone for sins I havedone! There must be some deeper meaningin these sacrifices, dear father, yet unrevealedto us.

As I was returning from the Temple I metmany persons, who seemed to be crowdingout of the gate on some unusual errand. Ihave since learned that they were going tosee a very extraordinary man—a trueprophet of God, it is believed by many, whodwells in the wilderness eastward near Jordan,and who preaches with power unknownin the land since the days of Elijah andElisha. I hope he is a true prophet ofheaven, and that God is once more about toremember Israel, but the days of theProphets have long passed away, and I fearthis man is only an enthusiast.

Farewell, dear father, and let us ever prayfor the glory of Israel.

Your affectionate,

Adina.


LETTER II.

My Dear Father:

The street in which we dwell is elevated,and from the roof of the house, where Ilove to walk in the evening, watching thestars that hang over Egypt, there is commandeda wide prospect of the Holy City.

Yesterday morning I was early on thehouse-top, to behold the first cloud of theday-dawn sacrifice rise from the bosom ofthe Temple. When I had turned my gazetowards the sacred summit, I was awed bythe profound silence which reigned over thevast pile that crowned Mount

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