The Turning of the Tide; Or, Radcliffe Rich and His Patients

The Turning of the Tide; Or, Radcliffe Rich and His Patients
Title: The Turning of the Tide; Or, Radcliffe Rich and His Patients
Release Date: 2017-05-23
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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By GEORGE MAKEPEACE TOWLE.

Heroes and Martyrs of Invention.
Vasco da Gama; His Voyages and Adventures.
Pizarro; His Adventures and Conquests.
Magellan; or, The First Voyage Round the World.
Marco Polo; His Travels and Adventures.
Raleigh; His Voyages and Adventures.
Drake; The Sea King of Devon.

By CAPT. CHARLES W. HALL.

Adrift in the Ice Fields.

By DR. ISAAC I. HAYES.

Cast Away in the Cold; An Old Man's Story of a Young Man'sAdventures.

By W. H. G. KINGSTON.

The Adventures of Dick Onslow among the Redskins.
Ernest Bracebridge; or, School Boy Days.

By JAMES D. McCABE JR.

Planting the Wilderness; or, The Pioneer Boys.

By DR. C. H. PEARSON.

The Cabin on the Prairie.
The Young Pioneers of the Northwest.

By JAMES DE MILLE.

The Lily and the Cross; A Tale of Acadia.

By F. G. ARMSTRONG.

The Young Middy: or, The Perilous Adventures of a BoyOfficer.

By R. M. BALLANTYNE.

The Life Boat; A Tale of Our Coast Heroes.


Sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of price.


Lee and Shepard, Publishers, Boston


The first Money

The first Money. Page 29.


[Pg 1]

THE WHISPERING PINE SERIES.


THE
TURNING OF THE TIDE;

OR,

RADCLIFFE RICH AND HIS PATIENTS.

BY

ELIJAH KELLOGG,

AUTHOR OF "LION BEN," "CHARLIE BELL," "THE ARK OF ELM ISLAND," "THE BOY
FARMERS," "THE YOUNG SHIP-BUILDERS," "THE HARD-SCRABBLE," "ARTHUR
BROWN," "THE YOUNG DELIVERERS," "THE CRUISE OF THE CASCO,"
"THE CHILD OF THE ISLAND GLEN," "JOHN GODSOE'S LEGACY,"
"THE SPARK OF GENIUS," "THE SOPHOMORES OF
RADCLIFFE," "THE WHISPERING PINE,"
"WINNING HIS SPURS," ETC.

ILLUSTRATED.

BOSTON 1892
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
10 MILK STREET NEXT "THE OLD SOUTH MEETING HOUSE"
NEW YORK CHAS. T. DILLINGHAM
718 AND 720 BROADWAY


[Pg 2]

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873,
By LEE AND SHEPARD,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.


[Pg 3]

PREFACE.


A distinguished professor of Mathematics in a New England college waswont to remark to the Freshman class when meeting them for the firsttime at recitation, "that every person is as lazy as he can be." Howeverwe may demur to this sweeping assertion, it is doubtless true that morepersons fail in life through indolence and the absence of appropriateand wholesome stimulus than from lack of capacity to become useful andeven distinguished.

Misfortune, undesirable as it may seem, nevertheless furnishes aneffective test of character, for, while the effeminate nature of laxfibre crumbles and is disintegrated beneath the pressure, the manlierspirit, like Dannemora iron, defies the[Pg 4] fury of the furnace, and evenbeneath the hammer, gathers both temper and tenacity.

How great the change produced in a Scotch pebble, taken from the banksof a Highland lake, when the wheel of the lapidary has brought out thehues, and it appears what it really is, a gem; thus the thrill of suddencalamity, the sharp anguish that makes the blood spring from the liphave often supplied both object and motive to many a spirit that(capacious of better things) was fast becoming honeycombed by the rustof luxury and indolence, and has developed gifts of which even thepossessor was unconscious.

The Turning of the Tide places before our readers this entire process inthe person of Radcliffe Rich, from the rude awakening, the moment whenthe half-benumbed faculties rally for the mastery, to the stern conflictand the hard-won victory.


[Pg 5]

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I.
PAGE
The Smith of the Wilderness. 9
 
CHAPTER II.
The First Money. 18
 
CHAPTER III.
Experience the best Teacher. 31
 
CHAPTER IV.
Hammer and Tongs. 42
 
CHAPTER V.
Drew sore and savage. 51
 
CHAPTER VI.
Patient, but determined. 63
 
CHAPTER VII.
He finds the Clue. 78
 
[Pg 6]CHAPTER VIII.
A Trade the best Inheritance. 101
 
CHAPTER IX.
Blood will tell. 113
 
CHAPTER X.
Dead Low Water. 125
 
CHAPTER XI.
A striking Contrast. 134
 
CHAPTER XII.
Did not come to see the Wreck. 142
 
CHAPTER XIII.
Morton's Business. 150
 
CHAPTER XIV.
Winning Golden Opinions. 160
 
CHAPTER XV.
How Dan took his Medicine. 170
 
CHAPTER XVI.
Peril of being out Evenings. 180
 
[Pg 7]CHAPTER XVII.
The Young Samaritans. 192
 
CHAPTER XVIII.
Dan wants to know Himself. 205
 
CHAPTER XIX.
Dan traps large Game. 214
 
CHAPTER XX.
Goes for Wool, and gets shorn. 222
 
CHAPTER XXI.
Progress and Prejudice. 231
 
CHAPTER XXII.
Suiting Means to Ends. 244
 
CHAPTER XXIII.
The Turn of the Tide. 260
 
CHAPTER XXIV.
The Young Flood. 278

[Pg 9]

THE TURNING OF THE TIDE.


CHAPTER I. THE SMITH OF THE WILDERNESS.

With Rich, the chum and friend of Morton, and who, animated by thecontagion of a noble example, became his rival in rank as a scholar andin all athletic sports, his companion in labor, and between whom, thoughneck and neck in the pursuit of those college honors that each mosthighly prized, there was never a shadow of jealousy or distrust, whiletheir sympathies met and mingled like fibres of a kindred root, drawingtheir nutriment from a common soil,—with Rich, refined in all histastes, of delicate sensibilities, and a playful humor that never stung,sunny tempered, generous, companionable, yet firm in principle as agranite shaft, and whom all Radcliffe idolized, our constant readers arealready well acquainted; but the exigencies of this story, and thenecessity of imparting information both to them and others, render itimperative that we should speak[Pg 10] more definitely respecting his familyand home life, to which we have heretofore barely alluded; indeed, weare not aware that we have ever distinguished him by any other name thanthat of Richardson, and much more frequently made use of the collegeterm, Rich.

His grandfather, with ten other young married men, first broke ground inour hero's native town, then a wilderness, and built their camps on theborders of a stream heavily timbered, soon after the formation of thefederal government with Washington as president. They were, with asingle exception, poor, having taken up their abode in the wildernessbecause they wanted a home, and could buy the wild land for ten centsper acre. Full of enterprise, and strong in limb, this little communityfelt themselves equal to the struggle. They had as yet neither sawmillnor gristmill, though a noble stream fell over the rocks close to theirdoors, but pounded the corn they raised on burns in large mortars, orwent in canoes eleven miles to mill, to a village farther down thestream, where they likewise procured salt. There were neither roads norhorses in the clearing, and at first everything was brought through thewoods, in the winter on men's shoulders, walking on snow-shoes, and insummer in canoes or on rafts up the river.

They were accustomed to put the grain and corn belonging to severalneighbors into a large canoe,[Pg 11] and thus take it down the river to themill. At length a road was spotted through the woods to thevillage—that is, a piece of bark and wood was taken off the side oftrees with an axe, for a guide to the traveler. The path was crooked,going through those portions of the forest that were thinnest, andwinding around obstacles. Occasionally a tree that stood very much inthe way was cut, and a log flung across some gully, brook, or mire.

In the early part of winter, when the brooks and swamps were frozen, andthe snow deep enough to cover, in some measure, the windfalls, and fillthe ravines, and at other times in the latter part of

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