The Mary Frances Story Book; or, Adventures Among the Story People

The Mary Frances Story Book; or, Adventures Among the Story People
Title: The Mary Frances Story Book; or, Adventures Among the Story People
Release Date: 2018-01-06
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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This ebook is dedicated to
Emmy
friend, colleague, mentor, role model,
who fell off the planet far too soon.


THE
MARY FRANCES
STORY BOOK


Cover
Endpaper
For all boys and girls who love stories.
Jane Eayre Fryer

Books by Jane Eayre Fryer


THE MARY FRANCES COOK BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Kitchen People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES SEWING BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Thimble People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES HOUSEKEEPER

Or, Adventures Among the Doll People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES GARDEN BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Garden People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES KNITTING AND
CROCHETING BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Knitting People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES FIRST AID BOOK

Price $1.25 Net

THE MARY FRANCES STORY BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Story People

Price $2.00 Net

THE MARY FRANCES BIBLE STORY BOOK

Or, Adventures Among the Bible People

Price $2.00 Net


THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY

Publishers 1006–1016Arch Street, Philadelphia

They Could See that the Pirate’s Ship was Keepingthe Distance the Same as at First Between Them

Title page
THE MARY FRANCES STORY BOOK
OR ADVENTURES AMONG THE STORY PEOPLE
by JANE EAYRE FRYER
ILLUSTRATED BY EDWIN JOHN PRITTIE
THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY PHILADELPHIA, PA.

Copyright, 1921, by
THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY
Entered at Stationers’ Hall, London


All Rights Reserved

Made in the
U.S.A.


PREFACE

The Mary Frances Story Book is different from the otherMary Frances Books. They are part lessons and part story; theyteach something about cooking and sewing, knitting and crocheting,housekeeping and gardening, and first-aid—and tell a story, too; butThe Mary Frances Story Book is all story.

On a summer afternoon Mary Frances took a holiday and sailed awayacross the blue water to an island—an island formed by the top of acoral mountain resting in a sea of blue; oh, so blue—a brighter bluethan the water in your mother’s bluing tub—not the blue that makes youfeel sad and blue, but the blue that makes you laugh with happiness.The island itself and the roofs of the houses were coral white, andthe green was the green of the palm and banana and mahogany tree. Thebreezes that blew over them were the warm, soft breezes of the southernsun. This island was the “enchanted island” of the good story-tellerswhich Mary Frances was allowed to visit. The story people who livedthere believed in truth and beauty, and courage and kindness, and thesewere the theme of their stories. Like all good islands, this islandhad enemies, but they came to a bad end, as, in the long run, all evilpersons will; and truth and beauty, and courage and kindness won theday, as they always must in every land where the searchlight of the sunflashes its beams.

As may be imagined, when Mary Frances came home she had not only one,but many stories to tell; and they are written in this book.

J. E. F.

Merchantville, N. J.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

For kind permission to use copyrighted and other material, the authoris indebted to the following: Milton Bradley Company, for “TheClosing Door”, from Mother Stories, by Maud Lindsay; Little, Brown& Company, for “Tom Goes Down the Well”, from Mice at Play, by NeilForest; Presbyterian Board of Publication, for “Gloomy Gus and theChristmas Cat”, by Alfred Westfall, and “Ann Catches a Thief”, by DaisyGilbert; McLoughlin Brothers, for “Patty and Her Pitcher”; The BeaconPress, for “The Brahmin, the Tiger, and the Jackal”, from First Bookof Religion; Cassel & Company, for “Music Bewitched”, by HartleyRichards; American Baptist Publication Society, for “John and MargaretPaton Among Savages”, by Grace E. Craig; Bobbs-Merrill Company, for“Your Flag and My Flag”, from The Trail to Boyland, by Wilbur D.Nesbit, copyright 1904. Acknowledgment is also due to Cassell, Petter,Galpin & Company, for “The Bubble Story”, “Mischievous Anna and Peter”,and “The Cat and the Carrots”.

CONTENTS

THE TRIP TO STORY ISLAND
CHAPTER  PAGE
I.On the Shore 15
II.The Good Ferry Puts Out to Sea 18
III.The Pirate’s Cat 23
IV.The Story of the Lost Story 26
V.Land Ahoy 29
VI.The Old Witch and the Iron-Chain Curtain 35
VII.Finding the Lost Story 37
VIII.The Pirate Chases The Good Ferry 42
IX.The Terrible Punishment of the Pirate and the Old Witch 44
X.The Bubble StoryAnon.47
STORIES TOLD THE FIRST DAY
XI.Mischievous Anna and PeterAnon.55
XII.Diamonds and ToadsMacé’s Fairy Tales61
XIII.The Magic NecklaceMacé’s Fairy Tales67
XIV.The Cat and the CarrotsAnon.73
XV.The Brahmin, the Tiger, and the JackalHindu Folk Tale79
XVI.The Red DragonAnon. 82
XVII.Two Poems 84
 If I Could Crow 84
 The Twins 85
XVIII.Tiny’s Adventures in Tinytown 87
 Tiny Gets Lost 88
 Tiny Is Put in the Lock-up 91
 Tiny Is Adopted 94
 Tiny Discovers a Fire 100
8XIX.Tiny Has More Adventures 102
 Tiny Saves a Baby’s Life 104
 Tiny Goes Shopping 107
 Tiny’s Mother Finds Her 111
STORIES TOLD THE SECOND DAY
XX.The Magic MaskOld Tale—Retold119
XXI.The Closing DoorMaud Lindsay126
XXII.Tom Goes Down the WellNeil Forest130
XXIII.Gloomy Gus and the Christmas CatAlfred Westfall139
XXIV.Patty and Her PitcherCrowquill’s Fairy Tales146
 In the Magic Circle 146
 The Wonderful Pitcher 147
 The Well-dressed Stranger 154
 Patty in Trouble 156
 The Pitcher to the Rescue 158
THE STORIES OF THE THIRD DAY
XXV.Sir GalahadSir Thomas Malory—Adapted165
 King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table 165
 Galahad Receives the Order of Knighthood 167
 The Adventure of the Sword in the Stone 168
 Sir Galahad Sits in the Perilous Seat 170
 Sir Galahad Wins the Sword of Balin le Savage 173
 The Knights of the Round Table Set Out in Quest of the Holy Grail 176
 Sir Galahad Finds a White Shield with a Red Cross 178
 Sir Launcelot and Sir Percival Attack Sir Galahad 182
9 The Adventure of the Gentlewoman, the Mysterious Ship, and the Sword of the Strange Belt 185
 The Gentlewoman Risks Her Life for Another 191
 Sir Galahad Meets a Knight in White Armor 193
 Sir Galahad Achieves His Quest, and Bears the Holy Grail Across the Sea 195
 The Passing of Sir Galahad, the End of Sir Percival, and the Return of Sir Bors to Camelot 200
XXVI.How Sir Launfal Achieved the Holy GrailJames Russell Lowell—Retold203
THE STORIES OF THE FOURTH DAY
XXVII.Music BewitchedHartley Richards211
 Bob’s Three Foes 211
 Father Pan’s Revenge 215
XXVIII.Ann Catches a ThiefDaisy Gilbert219
XXIX.John and Margaret Paton Among SavagesGrace E. Craig226
XXX.The Strange GuestWashington Irving—Retold from The Spectre Bridegroom233
 The Wedding Feast 240
 The Midnight Music 244
XXXI.Robert of SicilyHenry W. Longfellow—Retold248
XXXII.The Man Without a CountryEdward Everett Hale—Retold254
XXXIII.Your Flag and My FlagWilbur D. Nesbit264
THE LAST DAY ON STORY ISLAND
 The Cricket on the Hearth, A Fairy Tale of HomeCharles Dickens—Adapted271
XXXIV.Chirp the First 271
 The Peerybingles 271
10 The Strange Old Gentleman 274
 Caleb Plummer 277
 Tackleton 279
 Dot is Upset 281
XXXV.Chirp the Second 285
 Bertha, the Blind Girl, and Her Father 285
 Tackleton Comes In 288
 Bertha’s Eyes 291
 The Carrier’s Cart 293
 The Party at Caleb’s 298
 The Shadow on the Hearth 302
XXXVI.Chirp the Third 306
 John Listens to the Cricket 306
 John Blames Himself 308
 Caleb Confesses His Deceit 312
 The Dead Returns to Life 316
 Tackleton Does the Unexpected 321
THE RETURN HOME
XXXVII.Good-by, Mary Frances. Come Again! 325

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

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They Could See that the Pirate’s Ship was Keeping the Distancethe Same as at First Between ThemFrontispiece
 PAGE
Mary Frances Leaned Down and Caught Hold of His Fins21
“Just Some Flying Fish,” Answered the Cat31
She Fed Him a Little at a Time with a Medicine Dropper39
On One of the Flowers was Perched a Tiny Fairy49
They were as High Up in the Air as the Top of a Mountain57
She Drank Long and Eagerly63
He Threw the Necklace Around Coralie’s Neck69
“Have You no Feelings?” said the Carrot75
“Wow!” shrieked the Dragon82
Just at Her Feet Lay the Tiniest Little Bit of a Town89
The Pony Cantered All the Way Down the Street99
She Ran as Fast as She Could and was Just in Time to Drag the Baby Out of the Way of the Wagon105
“Mother!” she Cried. “Oh, Mother!”113
The Magic Mask was Ready, and Herlo Tried It on the King’s Face123
But All the United Efforts of Bess and Bob and Archie’s Left Arm could not Raise Tom135
12He Swung Down the Trail with a Speed that Mocked the Wind at His Back143
She then Touched the Pitcher with Her Wand150
“Be not Alarmed, Dear Mistress,” said the Pitcher157
Immediately He Grasped the Sword by the Handle, But could not Stir It171
Then Sir Galahad Took His Place in the Field175
A Monk Led Him Behind the Altar where the Shield Hung as White as Snow, but in the Center was a Red Cross181
The Damsel Rode as Fast as Her Horse would Gallop that Night and All The Next Day till They Came in Sight of the Sea187
Slowly Sleep Came Upon Him and He Dreamed205
Away Went the Schoolmaster’s Legs, Cutting such Capers as the World Never Looked Upon Before217
Before the Door of a Low, Thatched Hut Stood a Fair-haired Young Woman227
Once He Thought He Saw Them237