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Making the Nine

Making the Nine
Title: Making the Nine
Release Date: 2018-01-22
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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MAKING THE NINE


BOOKS BY ALBERTUS T. DUDLEY

Phillips Exeter Series
Illustrated. 12mo. Cloth.
FOLLOWING THE BALL.
MAKING THE NINE.
IN THE LINE.
WITH MASK AND MITT.
THE GREAT YEAR.
THE YALE CUP.
A FULL-BACK AFLOAT.
THE PECKS IN CAMP.
THE HALF-MILER.

Stories of the Triangular League
Illustrated by Charles Copeland. 12mo. Cloth.
THE SCHOOL FOUR.
AT THE HOME PLATE.
THE UNOFFICIAL PREFECT.
THE KING’S POWDER.

LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON.

Phil did not walk in from the field.–Page 321.


PHILLIPS EXETER SERIES

MAKING THE NINE
BY
ALBERTUS T. DUDLEY
AUTHOR OF “FOLLOWING THE BALL”
ILLUSTRATED BY CHARLES COPELAND
BOSTON:
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.

Copyright, 1904, by Lee and Shepard.
Published August, 1904.

All Rights Reserved.

Making the Nine.
PRINTED IN U.S.A.

To
GEORGE ALBERT WENTWORTH
KNOWN TO THE WORLD AS THE AUTHOR OF
A SCORE OF STANDARD TEXT-BOOKS
TO THE ALUMNI OF
THE PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY
AS
The Great Master of Boys

PREFACE

The cordial welcome given to FollowingThe Ball by boy readers and parents—severecritics both, though from very different standpoints—hasled to the writing of this secondstory, in which baseball has a sufficiently importantpart to suggest the title.

The author’s purpose in each case has beento produce a readable story true to the life ofa distinctly American school, true to athletics intheir better spirit and character, and teaching—notpreaching—a manly and reasonable ideal.If he has not succeeded in this, the failure cancertainly not be charged to lack of experiencewith athletics or school life or the ways of boys.

Hearty acknowledgments for expert advice onthe technicalities of baseball training and playare due to Dr. Edward H. Nichols of Boston,who, as player, head coach, and graduate adviser,has probably contributed more to Harvardvictories on the diamond than any other oneman. The play marking the climax of thegame described in Chapter XXVI is a historicone, borrowed from a Yale-Harvard contest.Its hero was Mr. George W. Foster, of a championHarvard nine.

ALBERTUS T. DUDLEY.


CONTENTS

Chapter   Page
I An Unwelcome Proposition. 1
II On the Ice. 13
III The Battle. 25
IV Phil’s Resolution. 38
V A Tough Problem. 45
VI A Western Solution. 57
VII In the Baseball Cage. 71
VIII A Transaction in Books. 82
IX Burglary. 90
X Mr. Moore’s Theory. 98
XI Flanahan strikes out. 110
XII Varrell explains himself. 122
XIII The Spring Running. 131
XIV Under Two Flags. 146
XV About Many Things. 156
XVI Phil makes his Début. 168
XVII A Nocturnal Mystery. 181
XVIII A Spilled Pitcher. 191
XIX The Coveted Opportunity. 200
XX An Unexpected Blow. 218
XXI A Gloomy Prospect. 232
XXII The Decision of the Court. 243
XXIII The Great Track Meet. 261
XXIV The Hillbury Game. 282
XXV On the Third Floor of Hale. 300
XXVI A Double Assist. 314
XXVII Conclusion. 325

ILLUSTRATIONS

Phil did not walk in from the field Frontispiece
The Western contingent were established among the pines on the right 26
A Corner in Sands’s Room 70
He heard voices,—at first indistinct, then somewhat clearer 150
The Academy through the Trees 190
In the Campus Woods 242
He suddenly turned and pulled the ball down 292
The Main Street of Seaton 324

MAKING THE NINE

CHAPTER I
 
AN UNWELCOME PROPOSITION

How they do yell! Where’s your patriotism,Phil, to be hanging round in this gloomycrowd when all your friends are howling theirheads off outside? Don’t you know Yale wonthe game? Why aren’t you out there with therest?”

Philip Poole looked up with a smile, but didnot reply.

“He’s comforting the afflicted,” said DickMelvin, who shared with Poole the ownershipof the room. “You don’t want to gloat overus poor Harvardites, do you, Phil? Thank youmuch for your sympathy.”

“That isn’t the reason,” said the lad, after apause, with the sober look in his big, wide-openeyes that made him seem serious even whenhis feelings inclined in the opposite direction.“I just don’t see any cause for such a racket.A Yale football victory over Harvard is tooordinary an occurrence to get wild over.”

The chorus of hoots and groans that greetedthis explanation brought a smile of satisfactionto the boy’s face. He was the youngest of thecompany, only in his second year at Seaton;the others were mostly seniors. As Melvin’sroom-mate, however, and in a measure still underthe senior’s care, Poole was thrown as muchwith the older students as with his own classmates;and the intimacy thus developed hadserved both to sharpen his wits and to givehim practice in self-defence.

Melvin himself had not been at Seaton muchlonger than Phil. He had entered at the beginningof the Middle year, an unknown boy,green, sanguine, eager to win a scholarship andso relieve his father of some of the expense ofhis schooling. Soon, however, fascinated by footballand the glamour of the school athletic world,he had failed to subordinate his sport to the realobjects of school life. How he made the schooleleven and went down with it to defeat; how helost his scholarship; how the care of young Phil,suddenly offered him by the lad’s uncle, soberedand steadied him and enabled him to stay inschool; how he and John Curtis fought the longuphill fight to develop a strong team, and finallydefeated the rival school,—all this has alreadybeen told in another book, and can only be referredto very briefly here. The great gamewhich marked the climax of the struggle was stilla recent event.

“You didn’t take it so calmly when Seaton wonthe victory two weeks ago, and your belovedDick spent the afternoon kicking the ball overthe Hillbury goal-posts,” said Varrell, a tall, quietboy, with keen, restless eyes that followed the conversationfrom face to face.

“That’s different,” replied Poole. “I’m firstfor Seaton and afterwards for Yale. The collegecan wait until I get there—and that will be along time yet,” he added ruefully, “if what I wastold in the algebra class to-day holds true.”

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