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Miles Standish, the Puritan Captain

Miles Standish, the Puritan Captain
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Title: Miles Standish, the Puritan Captain
Release Date: 2018-04-28
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Transcriber’s Note: Cover created by Transcriber from the materials in the originalbook, and placed in the Public Domain.

BURIAL HILL, PLYMOUTH.

Miles Standish
THE
PURITAN CAPTAIN.

BY
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.

NEW YORK:
DODD & MEAD, No. 762 BROADWAY.
1872.

AMERICAN PIONEERS AND PATRIOTS.

Miles Standish,
THE
PURITAN CAPTAIN.

BY JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.

ILLUSTRATED.

NEW YORK:
DODD & MEAD, No. 762 BROADWAY.
1872.


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1872, by
DODD & MEAD,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

Middleton & Co.,
Stereotypers,
Bridgeport, Conn.

Press of Lange, Little & Hillman.
108 Wooster St., N. Y.


TO THE DESCENDANTS OF
CAPTAIN MILES STANDISH,
NOW NUMBERING THOUSANDS,
THIS VOLUME IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED;
WITH THE HOPE THAT NO ONE OF THEM MAY EVER DIM
THE LUSTRE OF THAT NAME,
TO WHICH THE VIRTUES OF THEIR DISTINGUISHED ANCESTOR
HAVE ATTACHED IMPERISHABLE RENOWN.

JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.


i

PREFACE.

The adventures of our Pilgrim Fathers must everbe a theme of absorbing interest to all their descendants.Their persecutions in England, their flight toHolland, their passage across the stormy ocean, thisnew world, as they found it, swept by the storms ofapproaching winter, their struggles with the hardshipsof the wilderness, and conflicts with the ferocioussavage,—all combine in forming a narrativereplete with the elements of entertainment and instruction.

Fortunately, there can be no doubt in referenceto the essential facts. All these events have occurredwithin the last three hundred years, a periodfully covered by authentic historical documents. Ingiving occasional extracts from these documents, Ihave deemed it expedient to modernize the spelling,and occasionally to exchange an unintelligible, obsoleteword for one now in use.

For a period of about forty years, Captain MilesStandish was intimately associated with the Pilgrims.iiHis memory is inseparably connected with theirs.It has been a constant pleasure to the author toendeavor to rear a worthy tribute to the heroiccaptain and the noble man, who was one of themost illustrious of those who laid the foundationsof this great Republic.

JOHN S. C. ABBOTT.

Fair Haven, Conn.


iii

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
  Page
Elizabeth’s Act of Uniformity.—Oppressive Enactments.—King James and his Measures.—Persecution of the Non-Conformists.—Plans for Emigration.—The Unavailing Attempt.—The Disaster near Hull.—Cruel Treatment of the Captives.—The Exiles at Amsterdam.—Removal to Leyden.—Decision to Emigrate to America.—The reasons.—Elder Brewster Selected as Pastor.—The Departure from Leyden.—Scene at Delft Haven.—The Embarkation. 9
CHAPTER II.
The Departure from Southampton.—Hindrances.—Delay at Dartmouth and Plymouth.—Abandonment of the Speedwell.—Sketch of Miles Standish.—Death at Sea.—Perils and Threatened Mutiny.—Narrow Escape of John Howland.—Arrival at Cape Cod.—Testimony of Governor Bradford.—The Civil Contract.—John Carver Chosen Governor.—The First Exploring Tour.—The Sabbath. 30
CHAPTER III.
Repairing the Shallop.—The Second Exploring Tour.—Interesting Discoveries.—Return to the Ship.—A Week of Labor.—The Third Exploring Tour.—More Corn Found.—Perplexity of the Pilgrims.—The Fourth Expedition.—The First Encounter.—Heroism of the Pilgrims.—Night of Tempest and Peril.—A Lee Shore Found.—Sabbath on the Island. 44
CHAPTER IV.iv
The Voyage Resumed.—Enter an Unknown Harbor.—Aspect of the Land.—Choose it for their Settlement.—The Mayflower Enters the Harbor.—Sabbath on Shipboard.—Exploring the Region.—The Storm and Exposure.—The Landing.—View from the Hill.—Arduous Labors.—The Alarm.—Arrangement of the Village.—The Evident Hostility of the Indians.—Gloomy Prospects.—Expedition of Captain Standish.—Billington Sea.—Lost in the Woods.—Adventures of the Lost men.—The Alarm of Fire. 71
CHAPTER V.
Days of Sunshine and Storm.—Ravages of Pestilence.—A Raging Storm.—New Alarm of Fire.—Twelve Indians Seen.—Two Indians Appear on the Hill.—Great Alarm in the Settlement.—Measures of Defense.—More Sunny Days.—Humanity and Self-Denial of Miles Standish and Others.—Conduct of the Ship’s Crew.—Excursion to Billington Sea.—The Visit of Samoset.—Treachery of Captain Hunt.—The Shipwrecked Frenchmen.—The Plague.—The Wampanoags.—More Indian Visitors.—Bad Conduct of the Billingtons. 92
CHAPTER VI.
Two Savages on the Hill.—The Return of Samoset with Squantum.—The Story of Squantum.—The Visit of Massasoit and His Warriors.—Etiquette of the Barbarian and Pilgrim Courts.—The Treaty.—Return of the Mayflower to England.—A View of Plymouth.—Brighter Days.—Visit of Messrs. Winslow and Hopkins to the Seat of Massasoit.—Incidents of the Journey. 117
CHAPTER VII.
The Lost Boy.—The Expedition to Nauset.—Interesting Adventures.—The Mother of the Kidnapped Indians.—Tyanough.—Payment for the Corn.—Aspinet, the Chief.—The Boy Recovered.—Alarmingv Intelligence.—Hostility of Corbitant.—The Friendship of Hobbomak.—Heroic Achievement of Miles Standish.—The Midnight Attack.—Picturesque Spectacle.—Results of the Adventure.—Visit to Massachusetts.—The Squaw Sachem.—An Indian Fort.—Charming Country.—Glowing Reports. 145
CHAPTER VIII.
Arrival of the Fortune.—Object of the Pilgrims in their Emigration.—Character of the New-Comers.—Mr. Winslow’s Letter.—The First Thanksgiving.—Advice to Emigrants.—Christmas Anecdote.—Alarming Rumor.—The Narragansets.—Curious Declaration of War.—The Defiance.—Fortifying the Village.—The Meeting in Council and the Result.—The Alarm.—The Shallop Recalled. 164
CHAPTER IX.
The Double-Dealing of Squantum.—False Alarm.—Voyage to Massachusetts.—Massasoit Demands Squantum.—The Arrival of the Boat.—The Virginia Massacre.—Preparations for Defense.—Arrival of the Charity and the Swan.—Vile Character of the Weymouth Colonists.—Arrival of the Discovery.—Starvation at Weymouth.—Danger of the Plymouth Colony.—Expeditions for Food.—Death of Squantum.—Voyage to Massachusetts and the Cape. 187
CHAPTER X.
Search for Corn.—Trip to Buzzard’s Bay.—Interesting Incident.—Energy and Sagacity of Captain Standish.—Hostile Indications.—Insolence of Witeewamat.—The Plot Defeated.—Sickness of Massasoit.—The Visit.—Gratitude of the Chief.—Visit to Corbitant.—Condition of the Weymouth Colony.—The Widespread Coalition.—Military Expedition of Captain Standish.—His Heroic Adventures.—End of the Weymouth Colony. 209
CHAPTER XI.vi
Letter from Rev. Mr. Robinson.—Defense of Captain Standish.—New Policy Introduced.—Great Destitution.—Day of Fasting and Prayer.—Answer to Prayer.—The First Thanksgiving.—The Colony at Weymouth.—Worthless Character of the Colonists.—Neat Cattle from England.—Captain Standish Sent to England.—Captain Wollaston and His Colony.—Heroism of Captain Standish.—Morton Vanquished.—Difficulty at Cape Ann.—Increasing Emigration.—The Division of Property. 232
CHAPTER XII.
The Virginia Emigrants.—Humanity and Enterprise of the Governor.—Envoy Sent to England.—Trading-Posts on the Kennebec and Penobscot Rivers.—Capture by the French.—The Massachusetts Colony.—Its Numbers and Distinguished Characters.—Trade with the Indians.—Wampum the New Currency.—Trading-Post at Sandwich.—Sir Christopher Gardener.—Captain Standish Moves to Duxbury.—Lament of Governor Bradford. 257
CHAPTER XIII.
Removal to Duxbury.—Intercourse with the Dutch.—Trading-Posts on the Connecticut.—Legend of the Courtship of Miles Standish.—Personal Appearance of the Captain.—Proposition to John Alden.—His Anguish and Fidelity.—Interview with Priscilla.—The Indian Alarm.—Departure of Captain Standish.—Report of his Death.—The Wedding. 281
CHAPTER XIV.
Menace of the Narragansets.—Roger Williams.—Difficulty on the Kennebec.—Bradford’s Narrative.—Captain Standish as Mediator.—The French on the Penobscot.—Endeavors to Regain the Lost Port.—Settlements on the Connecticut River.—Mortality Among the Indians.—Hostility of thevii Pequots.—Efforts to Avert War.—The Pequot Forts.—Death of Elder Brewster.—His Character. 301
CHAPTER XV.
Friendship Between Captain Standish and Mr. Brewster.—Character of Mr. Brewster.—His Death and Burial.—Mode of Worship.—Captain’s Hill.—Difficulty with the Narragansets.—Firmness and Conciliation.—Terms of Peace.—Plans for Removal from Plymouth.—Captain Standish’s Home in Duxbury.—Present Aspect of the Region. 332
CHAPTER XVI.
The Will of Captain Standish.—His Second Wife.—Captain’s Hill.—The Monument.—Letters from President Grant and General Hooker.—Oration by General Horace Binney Sargent.—Sketch of his Life.—Other Speakers.—Laying the Corner Stone.—Description of the Shaft. 358

viii


9

CHAPTER I.
The Pilgrims in Holland.

Elizabeth’s Act of Uniformity.—Oppressive Enactments.—KingJames and his Measures.—Persecution of the Non-Conformists.—Plansfor Emigration.—The Unavailing Attempt.—TheDisaster near Hull.—Cruel Treatment of the Captives.—TheExiles at Amsterdam.—Removal to Leyden.—Decision to Emigrateto America.—The reasons.—Elder Brewster Selected asPastor.—The Departure from Leyden.—Scene at Delft Haven.—TheEmbarkation.

Elizabeth, the maiden queen of England, commencedher long and eventful reign by issuing inMay, 1659 a law concerning religion entitled the“Act of Uniformity.” By this law all ministers wereprohibited from conducting public worship otherwisethan in accordance with minute directions for theChurch of England, issued by Parliament. Any onewho should violate this law was exposed to severepenalties, and upon a third offence to imprisonmentfor life.

England, having broken from the Church ofRome, and having established the Church of England,of which the queen was the head, Elizabeth andher counsellors were determined, at whatever cost, to10enforce entire uniformity of doctrines and of modesof worship. In their new organization they retainedmany of the ceremonies and much of the imposingdisplay of the Papal Church. There were very manyof the clergy and of the laity who, displeased withthe pageantry of the Roman Catholic Church, withits gilded robes and showy ceremonial, were resolvedto cherish a more simple and pure worship. Theyearnestly appealed for the abolition of this oppressiveact. Their petition was refused by a majority of butone in a vote of one hundred and seventeen in theHouse of Commons.

The queen was unrelenting, and demanded uniformityin the most peremptory terms. Thirty-sevenout of the ninety-eight ministers of London were arrestedfor violating this law. They were all suspendedfrom their ministerial functions, and fourteenof them were sent to jail.

There were now three ecclesiastical parties in England—thePapal or Roman Catholic, the Episcopal,or Church of England, and the Presbyterian or Puritanparty. The sympathies of the queen and of hercourtiers was much more with the Papists than withthe Presbyterians, and it was greatly feared that theywould go over to their side. The queen grew dailymore and more determined to enforce the disciplineof the English Church. The order was issued that11all preachers should be silenced who had not beenordained by Episcopal hands, or who refused to readthe whole service as contained in the Prayer book, orwho neglected to wear the prescribed clerical robes.Under this law two hundred and thirty-three ministers,in six counties, were speedily deposed. A Courtof High Commission was appointed invested with extraordinarypowers to arrest and punish all delinquents.

Any private person who should absent himselffrom the Episcopal Church for a month, or who shoulddissuade others from attending that form of worship,or from receiving the communion from an Episcopalclergyman, or who should be present at any “conventicleor meeting under color or pretence of any exerciseof religion,” should be punished with imprisonmentand should be held there until he signed the “Declarationof Conformity.” Or in default of such declarationhe was to be sent to perpetual exile under penaltyof death if he were ever again found within theBritish realms.

Notwithstanding that many were banished, andsome died in prison and several were hanged, thecause of dissent secretly gained ground. As

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