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The Three Voyages of Captain Cook Round the World. Vol. II. Being the Second of the First Voyage

The Three Voyages of Captain Cook Round the World. Vol. II. Being the Second of the First Voyage
Author: Cook James
Title: The Three Voyages of Captain Cook Round the World. Vol. II. Being the Second of the First Voyage
Release Date: 2018-05-13
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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ii

The cover image was created by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.

Canoe of New Zealand.

iii

THE
 
THREE
 
VOYAGES
 
OF
 
CAPTAIN JAMES COOK
 
ROUND THE WORLD.

COMPLETE
In Seven Volumes.

WITH MAP AND OTHER PLATES.

VOL. II.
BEING THE SECOND OF THE FIRST VOYAGE.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR
LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, AND BROWN,
PATERNOSTER-ROW.
1821.
iv

CONTENTS
 
OF
 
THE SECOND VOLUME.


FIRST VOYAGE.
 
BOOK II.
 
CHAP. VII.
 
Page
Range from Cape Turnagain southward along the eastern coast of Poenammoo, round Cape South, and back to the western Entrance of Cook’s Strait, which completed the Circumnavigation of this Country; with a Description of the Coast, and of Admiralty Bay. The Departure from New Zealand, and various Particulars 1
 
CHAP. VIII.
 
A general Account of New Zealand; its first Discovery, Situation, Extent, Climate, and Productions 24
 
CHAP. IX.
 
A Description of the Inhabitants, their Habitations, Apparel, Ornaments, Food, Cookery, and Manner of Life 34
 
CHAP. X.
 
Of the Canoes and Navigation of the Inhabitants of New Zealand; their Tillage, Weapons, and Music; Government, Religion, and Language: with some Reasons against the Existence of a Southern Continent 49
 
BOOK III.
 
CHAP. I.
 
The Run from New Zealand to Botany Bay, on the East Coast of New Holland, now called New South Wales; various Incidents that happened there; with some Account of the Country and its Inhabitants 67
 
viCHAP. II.
 
The Range from Botany Bay to Trinity Bay; with a farther Account of the Country, its Inhabitants, and Productions 91
 
CHAP. III.
 
Dangerous Situation of the Ship in her Course from Trinity Bay to Endeavour River 127
 
CHAP. IV.
 
Transactions while the Ship was refitting in Endeavour River.—A Description of the adjacent Country, its Inhabitants, and Productions 139
 
CHAP. V.
 
Departure from Endeavour River.—A particular Description of the Harbour there, in which the Ship was refitted, the adjacent Country, and several Islands near the Coast.—The Range from Endeavour River to the Northern Extremity of the Country, and the Dangers of that Navigation 170
 
CHAP. VI.
 
Departure from New South Wales.—A particular Description of the Country, its Products and People.—A Specimen of the Language, and some Observations upon the Currents and Tides 202
 
CHAP. VII.
 
The Passage from New South Wales to New Guinea, with an Account of what happened upon landing there 228
 
CHAP. VIII.
 
The Passage from New Guinea to the Island of Savu, and the Transactions there 240
 
CHAP. IX.
 
A particular Description of the Island of Savu, its Produce and Inhabitants, with a Specimen of their Language 258
 
CHAP. X.
 
The Run from the Island of Savu to Batavia, and an Account of the Transactions there while the Ship was refitting 280
 
viiCHAP. XI.
 
Some Account of Batavia, and the adjacent Country, with their Fruits, Flowers, and other Productions 299
 
CHAP. XII.
 
Some Account of the Inhabitants of Batavia, and the adjacent Country, their Manners. Customs, and Manner of Life 322
 
CHAP. XIII.
 
The Passage from Batavia to the Cape of Good Hope.—Some Account of Prince’s Island, and its Inhabitants, and a comparative View of their Language, with the Malay and Javanese 339
 
CHAP. XIV.
 
Our Arrival at the Cape of Good Hope.—Some Remarks on the Run from Java Head to that Place.—A Description of the Cape and of Saint Helena.—With some Account of the Hottentots, and the Return of the Ship to England 352
1AN
ACCOUNT
OF A
VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD,
IN 1768, 1769, 1770, AND 1771.

BOOK II.
 
CHAP. VII.
 
RANGE FROM CAPE TURNAGAIN SOUTHWARD ALONG THE EASTERN COAST OF POENAMMOO, ROUND CAPE SOUTH, AND BACK TO THE WESTERN ENTRANCE OF COOK’S STREIGHT, WHICH COMPLETED THE CIRCUMNAVIGATION OF THIS COUNTRY; WITH A DESCRIPTION OF THE COAST, AND OF ADMIRALTY BAY: THE DEPARTURE FROM NEW ZEALAND, AND VARIOUS PARTICULARS.

At four o’clock in the afternoon of Friday the 9thof February, we tacked, and stood S. W. till eighto’clock the next morning; when, being not abovethree or four miles from the shore, we stood off twohours, and then again S. W. till noon, when, at thedistance of about two miles from the shore, we hadtwenty-six fathom water.

We continued to make sail to the southward tillsunset on the 11th, when a fresh breeze at N. E. hadcarried us back again the length of Cape Palliser, ofwhich as the weather was clear we had a good view.It is of a height sufficient to be seen in clear weather2at the distance of twelve or fourteen leagues, and theland is of a broken and hilly surface. Between thefoot of the high land and the sea there is a low flatborder, off which there are some rocks that appearabove water. Between this Cape and Cape Turnagain,the land near the shore is, in many places,low and flat, and has a green and pleasant appearance;but farther from the sea it rises into hills. The landbetween Cape Palliser and Cape Tierawitte is highand makes in table-points; it also seemed to us toform two bays, but we were at too great a distancefrom this part of the coast to judge accurately fromappearances. The wind having been variable, withcalms, we had advanced no farther by the 12th atnoon than latitude 41° 52ʹ, Cape Palliser then bearingnorth, distant about five leagues; and the snowymountain S. 83 W.

At noon on the 13th, we found ourselves in thelatitude of 42° 2ʹ S.; Cape Palliser bearing N. 20 E.distant eight leagues. In the afternoon, a fresh galesprung up at N. E., and we steered S. W. by W. forthe southermost land in sight, which at sunset borefrom us S. 74 W. At this time the variation was15° 4ʹ E.

At eight o’clock in the morning of the 14th, havingrun one-and-twenty leagues S. 58 W. since the precedingnoon, it fell calm. We were then abreast ofthe snowy mountain which bore from us N. W. andin this direction lay behind a mountainous ridge ofnearly the same height, which rises directly from thesea, and runs parallel with the shore, which liesN. E. ½ N. and S. W. ½ S. The north-west end ofthe ridge rises inland, not far from Cape Campbell;and both the mountain and the ridge are distinctlyseen as well from Cape Koamaroo as Cape Palliser:from Koamaroo they are distant two-and-twentyleagues S. W. ½ S.; and from Cape Palliser thirtyleagues W. S. W.; and are of a height sufficient to beseen at a much greater distance. Some persons on3board were of opinion that they were as high as Teneriffe;but I did not think them as high as MountEgmont on the south-west coast of Eahienomauwe;because the snow, which almost entirely coveredMount Egmont, lay only in patches upon these. Atnoon this day, we were in latitude 42° 34ʹ S. Thesouthernmost land in sight bore S. W. ½ W.; and somelow land that appeared like an island, and lay closeunder the foot of the ridge, bore N. W. by N. aboutfive or six leagues.

In the afternoon, when Mr. Banks was out in theboat a shooting, we saw with our glasses four doublecanoes, having on board fifty-seven men, put off fromthat shore, and make towards him; we immediatelymade signals for him to come on board; but the ship,with respect to him, being right in the wake of the sun,he did not see them. We were at a considerable distancefrom the shore, and he was at a considerabledistance from the ship, which was between him andthe shore; so that, it being a dead calm, I began to bein some pain for him, fearing that he might not seethe canoes time enough to reach the ship before theyshould get up with him: soon after, however, we sawhis boat in motion, and had the pleasure to take himon board before the Indians came up, who probablyhad not seen him, as their attention seemed to bewholly fixed upon the ship. They came within abouta stone’s cast, and then stopped, gazing at us with alook of vacant astonishment: Tupia exerted all hiseloquence to prevail upon them to come nearer, butwithout any effect. After surveying us for sometime, they left us, and made towards the shore; buthad not measured more than half the distance betweenthat and the ship before it was dark. We imaginedthat these people had heard nothing of us, and couldnot but remark the different behaviour and dispositionsof the inhabitants of the different parts of thiscoast upon their first approaching the vessel. Thesekept aloof with a mixture of timidity and wonder;4others had immediately commenced hostilities, bypelting us with stones: the gentleman whom we hadfound alone, fishing in his boat, seemed to think usentirely unworthy of his notice; and some, almostwithout invitation, had come on board with an air ofperfect confidence and good-will. From the behaviourof our last visitors, I gave the land from which theyhad put off, and which, as I have before observed,had the appearance of an island, the name ofLookers-on.

At eight

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