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Bowling Catalog E

Bowling Catalog E
Title: Bowling Catalog E
Release Date: 2018-06-16
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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BOWLING CATALOG E,
by NARRAGANSETT MACHINE
COMPANY, PROVIDENCE, R. I.

Bowling and Alleys.


THErecent revival of thisinteresting game has resulted in the application of modern principlesof system and exactness to Alleys, Pins, and Balls. What would havebeen very good ten years ago will not answer at all now. The alley inparticular must be right from the start and remain so. This can onlybe expected of experienced builders, using first class materials. Wehave been building alleys for ten years and by giving them carefulstudy have produced good alleys. This catalogue describes them in everydetail. There are alleys and ALLEYS, but there is only one “STANDARD”ALLEY. The statements we make regarding it are facts, borne out by theclass of people who use it.

Yours respectfully,
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.,
Providence, R. I.

CLASS D, “STANDARD”BOWLINGALLEYS.

CONSTRUCTION. The beds rest on sleepers supported at their ends bysills running the entire length of the alleys. These may rest on aconcrete, cement, or other solid floor, or on posts or piers set 8 ft.apart, or where the ground is firm and dry of a gravelly nature, onflat stones laid on the ground. The sills raise both sleepers and bedclear of the ground or cement, and as there is ample air space beneaththem they are not liable to be affected by moisture which nearly alwayscollects in confined places near the ground. The beds are made ofstrips three inches wide, tongued and grooved on the sides, (see page14) and are built up by nailing and glueing each strip on top of thepreceding one until the bed stands on edge 42 inches high: in this waythe strips are firmly driven together and a solid bed secured. The bedis then laid down, screwed to the sleepers and planed.

DURABILITY. This is secured, first by the use of good well-seasonedtimber. Second by the ample air space beneath the alleys. As we uselarge quantities of the Hard White Maple of which the beds are made,we have arranged with several of the largest mills in the countryto select from their finest stock the best for our use, shipping incar-load lots. No such timber can be found in any city yards. TheSills and Sleepers are of Selected Hard Pine, known as one of themost durable woods. As none of the woodwork is bedded in cement orin any way closed up there is no tendency to dry rot, and it cannotbe affected by any ordinary degree of moisture. By long experiencein alley building we have ascertained the most durable materials fordifferent parts and their best forms, features that save wear and avoidearly and expensive repairs.

CROSS SECTION OF A PAIR OF CLASS C. ALLEYS.

CLASS C, “STANDARD”ADJUSTABLEALLEYS.

The Standard (Reiskey & Wolf Patent) Adjustable Alleys arecon­struct­ed in every de­tail the same as the Standard Bowling Alleysexcept that the sleepers on which the beds rest are adjustable. Theadjusting screws are placed at the ends of the sleepers and rest on thesills as shown above. They are riveted to Iron Shoes that are securedto the sills so that the screws can raise up or draw down the beds. Anydeviations of the beds from level, except such as are due to wear, maybe corrected by the adjusting screws, and the expense of re-planingavoided or reduced in cost. When it is necessary to plane out a wornspot the worn part may be raised by the screws and the necessity oftaking a deep cut of the whole bed avoided.

SECTIONAL ALLEYS. On the Adjustable principlewe build sectional Alleys with the beds in sections 12 to 14 feet longand 42 inches wide. After the Adjustable Sleepers are set and leveled,the bed sections are screwed to them and if necessary again leveled bythe adjusting screws. Such alleys are as near portable as it has beenpossible to get alleys and may be moved from Winter to Summer resorts,etc.

GENERAL SPECIFICATION.“STANDARD” Bowling Alleys.


BEDSfirst quality white maple, 3 in. wide,rabbetted on the sides, laid on edge, glued andnailed with cut steel nails.

LENGTH OF BED,78 ft., width, 41 to 42 in.,thickness, 3 in.

SLEEPERSto be of selected hard pine, 6 in.deep, 3 in. wide, placed at an average of 36 in. apart.

SILLSto be of Hard Pine 6 × 6, built of threepieces.

SCORE BOARDSof artificial slate, 20 in. by 27in. inside frame, ruled to 2 in. squares, framed inoak, with chalk rail.

SCRATCH LINE AND PIN SPOTSto be ofBlack Vulcanized fibre. Side cushions to be of hardwood faced with sole leather from a point oppositethe head pin to one foot beyond the end of the bed.

RUNS.One set for each pair of alleys, placedin the centre between the alleys, built low with oakcentre post placed at Scratch line as per regulation.

CAGEfor starting the balls to be of hickorywith wrought iron brackets.

GUTTERS9 in. wide, of selected hard pine.

SWINGING BUNTERSpadded with palm fibrein sections, divided by burlap and covered withheavy Black duck.

PIT4 ft. wide, length equal to width of alleys,padded on bottom, under end of bed and at the sides,with hair felt covered with heavy duck.

WOOD WORKwhere not otherwise specified tobe of selected hard pine.

WORKMANSHIPto be first-class throughout,beds to be true from end to end and level crosswise.All parts to be firmly secured and left in conditionfor use.

FINISH.Surfaces of beds to be planed andsanded to a smooth even surface, level from side toside, and end to end. Posts, runs, gutters, etc., tohave two coats of shellac varnish.

LYMAN GYMNASIUM,
BROWN UNIVERSITY,
PROVIDENCE . . R. I.
Stone, Carpenter & Wilson, Architects.
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
TWO ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.
PROVIDENCE. R. I.

ADVANTAGES.


The following claims are made for the “STANDARD”Bowling Alleys, and have been sustainedby use:

KEEP LEVEL. On account of the air spaceunderneath them, which is ventilated by openings,the beds are less affected by moisture rising fromthe ground, cement, etc.

SURFACE. The bed being glued up of stripshaving rabbets cut on the sides, form a solid bedin which no piece can get loose, slip, raise up, orgive any trouble.

FOUNDATIONS. Practically, no foundationis required; hence, a great saving is effected.The sills can be laid on a tar concrete or cementfloor, or on piers or posts set three feet in theground. All sills are supplied by us. As nopart of the foundation is buried in cement, it lastsindefinitely.

WEAR AND TEAR. By long experience wehave ascertained the best materials and forms tostand the severe usage of public and club alleysand by their use avoid the vexatious break-downsformerly so common on alleys.

EXPERIENCE. As we build a great manyalleys our workmen are accustomed to the workand know its requirements. Our alleys are notexperiments; they are tried and proved successes.

DURABILITY. The beds being made of doublekiln dried White Rock Maple, last longer anddo not require so much re-planing as if made ofsofter woods or maple as ordinarily seasoned.

RE-PLANING. The strips of which the bedsare made do not dry out and have cracks betweenthem that fill with grit and make re-planing almostimpossible.

WEST SIDE CLUB,
BOWLING ALLEYS,
PROVIDENCE . . R. I.
Gould, Angell & Swift, Architects,
PROVIDENCE, R. I.
BUILT BY THE
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.
PROVIDENCE. R. I.

MAPLEis unquestionably the best wood for alley beds. It is hard,white, durable, even grained and when properly seasoned anddried, will remain as laid without shrinking or warping. That is, thebest maple will do all this. We are large buyers of maple for alleys andother purposes, and get direct from the mills the highest grade of Hard, White(Rock) Maple. Such stock as is never carried by city yards—they have nocall for it. This fine stock enables us to build alley beds that are clearwhite from end to end, without spots or streaks, level and true. The idealbowling surfaces.

TAUNTON WINTHROP CLUB,
TAUNTON . . MASS.
A. E. SWAZEY, Architect,
TAUNTON, MASS.
ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.
PROVIDENCE. R. I.

LOWPosts and runs are an in­no­va­tion we in­tro­duced three or four years ago.Their ad­van­tages were ap­parent from the start and now no­thing else will betol­er­ated. They give both play­ers and spec­tators an unob­struct­ed view of the alleybeds and pins. In a room con­tain­ing eight or ten alleys, one can see every pin.The runs are strong, the posts beingshort, and as the balls do not haveto be raised so high to put them inthe cage they are dropped in easier andwear longer.

PALACE BOWLING ALLEYS,
MUSIC HALL,
PAWTUCKET . . R. I.
BUILT BY THE
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.
PROVIDENCE. R. I.
LONGITUDINALSECTIONOF ASTANDARDBOWLINGALLEY

DESCRIPTION.


The runs are low with a low post placed inside of the scratch line. These alleys conformin every detail to the Regulations of the Massachusetts Amateur Bowling League, which aregenerally adopted by other Eastern organizations.

The pit is four feet wide and is dropped well below the beds so that balls go over pinsor balls lying in the pit.

The swinging bunters are large, heavy, and well padded with a durable palm fibre, the paddingbeing in sections to prevent its packing down in the bottom of the bunter. The bottomand sides of the pit are padded, and from opposite the head-pin to one foot beyond the beds,the sides, where the flying pins strike, are covered with sole leather.

The ball cage and the first section of the runs are made of hickory to stand the severeuse.

Tonguing and grooving alley stock is a feature we introduced severalyears ago—long enough to have given it a good test. A bed built thisway, especially when glued and well nailed with cut steel nails, asours are, is a solid plank from end to end with the tendency to warpremoved by the strips having their grain in various directions. Looseor split ends that rise up and turn balls aside are an impossibility,and so close are the boards drawn to each other that it is almostimpossible to find the joints. Thus the dirt is kept from workingbetween the boards and forming unsightly cracks which let in water,when the alleys are washed, to work still more destruction.

ALLSTON CLUB,
ALLSTON . . MASS
TWO ALLEYS BUILT BY THE
NARRAGANSETTMACHINECO.
PROVIDENCE. R. I.

“STANDARD” BOWLING ALLEYS.

THEfol­low­ing is a list of Bowl­ing Al­leys laid from 1893 to 1895.The in­creas­ing num­ber of par­ties us­ing these al­leys is their bestrecom­men­da­tion.

  • 1893.
    • 1 Pair. Young Men’s Christian Association, Waterbury, Ct.
    • 1 Pair. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
    • 1 ½ Pairs. Germania Aid Association, Roxbury, Mass.
  • 1894.
    • 1 ½ Pairs. S. & B. Lederer, Providence, R. I.
    • 3 Pairs. Music Hall, Pawtucket, R. I.
    • 1 Pair. Derryfield Club, Manchester, N. H.
    • 2 ½ Pairs. Providence Athletic Association.
    • 1 ½ Pairs. P. Welch, Boston, Mass.
    • 1 Pair. The Gymnasium, Manchester, N. H.
    • 1 Pair. Young Men’s Christian Ass’n, Mauch Chunk, Pa.
    • 2 ½ Pairs. Edw. Hanscom, Worcester, Mass.
    • 1 Pair. Portland Athletic Club, Portland, Me.
    • 1 Pair. A. Williams, Wollaston, Mass.
    • 1 Pair. Charles W.
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