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Rambles in Istria, Dalmatia and Montenegro

Rambles in Istria, Dalmatia and Montenegro
Author: R. H. R.
Title: Rambles in Istria, Dalmatia and Montenegro
Release Date: 2018-06-25
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Transcriber's Note:

Inconsistent hyphenation and spelling in the original document have been preserved. Obvious typographical errors have been corrected.

The following alternative spellings were identified and left unchanged.

  • zigzags and zig-zags
  • Broniewsky and Broniewski
  • Petersburg and Petersburgh
  • Niegosh and Niegosch
  • Mahomedan and Mahommedan
  • Roganovitch and Roganovich
  • Vissegrad and Wissegrad
  • trowsers and trousers

RAMBLES IN ISTRIA, DALMATIA,
AND
MONTENEGRO.

RAMBLES IN ISTRIA,
DALMATIA AND MONTENEGRO.

BY
R. H. R.

"Dirvi ch'io sia, saria parlar indarno."—DANTE.

IN ONE VOLUME.

LONDON:
HURST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS.
13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.
1875.
All rights reserved.

Decoration

PREFACE.

Every year more and more is the constantlyrecurring question ever put"Where shall we go to this Summer?"and every year the field for selection gets narrowerand narrower.

In writing the following pages, my object hasbeen less to make a book than to point out to thosewho are tired of the old beaten tracks, countrieswithin easy reach of London, but seldom visited,and quite outside the lines affected by the typicaltourist:—countries where at moderate expense andwith total freedom from danger they may enjoy newscenery, receive fresh impressions, acquire newinformation; and if by so doing I shall havesuggested to others one more field for explorationthat shall afford them half the enjoyment which Iexperienced during my wanderings, I shall considermyself very amply rewarded.

Decoration
Decoration

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I.
A CONVERSATION—WHERE SHALL WE GO FOR A HOLIDAY TRIP—ATTRACTIONSOF LAPLAND—REMINISCENCES OF ITALY—THEGRAND TOUR IN FORMER DAYS—HOW TO STUDY HISTORY—DIFFICULTYOF FINDING NEW GROUND FOR TRAVEL—ANINTERESTING COUNTRY WITHIN FIVE DAYS OF TEMPLEBAR1
CHAPTER II.
MAN PROPOSES, BUT GOD DISPOSES—VIENNA—ST. STEPHEN'SCATHEDRAL—OLD CATHEDRALS—SANTA MARIA DEL FIORE—USESOF EAU DE COLOGNE—INSECT ATTACKS—THE UNIVERSALEXHIBITION—THE GARDENS AND ACCESSORIES—THELADIES OF VIENNA—NEW OPERA-HOUSE—ON THEDANUBE—A WEALTHY PRELATE—WISSEGRAD—ARRIVAL ATPESTH14viii
CHAPTER III.
PESTH—HOTEL UNGARIA—BUDA—STORY OF AN ARTIST—PROSPERITYOF THE CITY—NEW BRIDGE OVER THE DANUBE—ST.MARGUERITE'S ISLAND—ANCIENT ROMAN BATH—CONDITIONOF HUNGARY—FIELD FOR THE JUNIOR BRANCHESOF THE UPPER TEN THOUSAND—KEEPING UP APPEARANCES—THETERMINATION OF TURKISH MISRULE—FUTURE OFTHE DANUBIAN PRINCIPALITIES29
CHAPTER IV.
STEINBRÜCK—THE SÖMMERING—FIRST VIEW OF THE ADRIATIC—TRIESTE—SHOCKSOF EARTHQUAKE AT BELLUNO—AUSTRIANIRONCLAD 'LISSA'—CAPTAIN R. BURTON—FLYING VISIT TOSAN CANZIANO—SUBTERRANEAN COURSE OF A MOUNTAINSTREAM—THE KARST—WILD SCENERY—A THUNDER-STORM—CHURCHOF SAN CANZIANO—STUD FARM43
CHAPTER V.
THE "SAN CARLO" AND HER PASSENGERS—A DALMATIAN'SREMARKS ON THE PRESERVATION OF HEALTH IN INDIA—DALMATIANDIGGERS FROM AUSTRALIA—COAST OF ISTRIA—PIRANO—CATHEDRALOF PARENZO—ROVIGNO—POLA—THEAMPHITHEATRE—PICTURESQUE SIGHT—GIOVANNI ASTONISHED—MONTENEGRINCOSTUME—ZARA—EXTREMEHEAT61ix
CHAPTER VI.
DEPARTURE FROM ZARA—SEBENICO—PLEASANT COMPANIONS—NOBLEHARBOUR—THE CATHEDRAL—CURIOUS ROOF—CORALFISHERY—SPALATO—SALONA—DIOCLETIAN'S PALACE—MR.PATON'S DESCRIPTION OF IT—BEAUTIFUL SPECTACLE—THEPORTA FERREA—QUAINT DWELLINGS—AMBROSIAL TOBACCO79
CHAPTER VII.
A TYPE OF SHYLOCK—SCENE IN THE STREET—VARIED COSTUMES—MORLACCHI—TURKSFROM THE HERZEGOVINA—WOMEN OFSPALATO—INSPECTION OF THE CITY—THE PORTA AUREA—COURTOF THE VESTIBULE OF THE PALACE—INTERIOR OFTHE CATHEDRAL—ILLUSTRIOUS MEN OF SPALATO—MARKANTONY DE DOMINIS—ST. JEROME—THE MORLACCHI94
CHAPTER VIII.
ISLAND OF LISSA—NAVAL BATTLES—A BRIDAL PARTY TAKEN ONBOARD—LESINA—FORTRESS OF SAN NICOLO—THE LOGGIE—FORTSPAGNUOLO—ISLAND OF CURZOLA—LA CHROMA—BEAUTIFULSCENE—RICHARD CŒUR DE LION—CATHEDRAL OFRAGUSA—EARTHQUAKE OF 1667—TERRIBLE CONFLAGRATION—PRINCEMAXIMILIAN107x
CHAPTER IX.
THE PADRE ANSELMO—HIS LIFE AND LABOURS AMONG THEAMERICAN INDIANS—THE PIONEERS OF CIVILIZATION—AMERICANINDIANS AND NEGROES—PADRE ANSELMO ON PROTESTANTAND CATHOLIC MISSIONS—NATIVE CHRISTIANS ININDIA—POPE PIUS IX. ONCE A MISSIONARY—CARDINAL P—.—PORTOF GRAVOSA—RAGUSA125
CHAPTER X.
ATTRACTIONS OF DALMATIA—INTERESTING EXCURSION—ISLANDOF LACHROMA—CLIMATE—A. A. PATON, ESQ., FORMERLYCONSUL-GENERAL AT RAGUSA—AN ITALIAN DINNER—EPIDAURUS—THECANAL OF CATTARO—TERRITORY OF RAGUSA—TOWEROF PERASTO AND FORT OF SANTA CROCE—STRANGELYBUILT CHURCH—A PALAZZO—SAN GIORGIO AND LA MADONNA—PICTUREATTRIBUTED TO ST. LUKE141
CHAPTER XI.
CITY OF CATTARO—SIGNOR JACKSCHICH—STREETS AND PIAZZAS—WALKSAND FORTIFICATIONS—PUBLIC WALK—CAFÉ ANDGARDENS—SONOROUS STONE—A MONTENEGRIN CHIEF—AHAPPY BEGGAR BOY150xi
CHAPTER XII.
MONTENEGRIN TRADERS—LE SCALE DI CATTARO—A GORGEOUSLY-ATTIREDMONK—OUR CARAVAN—MONTENEGRINS OFTHE PRINCE'S BODY-GUARD—INTERESTING VIEW—ABSENCEOF TREES ON THE DALMATIAN COAST—A HOME FOR GERMANEMIGRANTS—TURKISH MISRULE IN EUROPE—A FUTURE EMPIRE—AMAN FIT TO RULE164
CHAPTER XIII.
THE PRINCE OF MONTENEGRO—UNJUST DEPRIVATION OF TERRITORY—ORIGINOF THE NAME OF THE COUNTRY—A FRIENDIN NEED—VILLAGE OF NIEGOSCH—PANORAMA SEEN FROMTHE TOP OF THE PASS—WILD-LOOKING HERDS AND FLOCKS—MONTENEGRINLEGEND—ARRIVAL AT CETTIGNE—THEVLADIKA'S PALACE—THE TREE OF JUSTICE—TOWER OF CETTIGNE177
CHAPTER XIV.
INSECT POWDER OF MONTENEGRO—DESCRIPTION OF THE MONASTERY—ENCAMPMENTS—FESTIVALOF ST. PETER—A SAINTBY THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE—PICTURESQUE SCENE—BOSNIANCAFÉ—THE NATIONAL INSTRUMENT—A TRAVELLEDDALMATIAN—TALL MONTENEGRINS194xii
CHAPTER XV.
A POLYGLOT JUMBLE—WAR CUSTOMS OF THE MONTENEGRINS—DEATHIN BATTLE—FORAYS FOR THE PLUNDER OF CATTLE—EQUIPAGEOF A MONTENEGRIN SOLDIER—PILLAGE—MANNEROF FIGHTING—TACTICS—SIGNAL CRIES—ON BOARDSHIP—DECAPITATION OF WOUNDED PRISONERS208
CHAPTER XVI.
BATTLE BETWEEN TURKS AND MONTENEGRINS—ADDRESS OFPRINCE MIRKO—HIS PERSONAL APPEARANCE AND CHARACTER—THEPROJECTS OF PRINCE DANIELO—PRINCE NICHOLAS I.—SPORTIN MONTENEGRO—INTERVIEW WITH THE PRINCEAND PRINCESS—NATIONAL COSTUME—SPLENDID ILLUMINATION218
CHAPTER XVII.
A WALK WITH THE PRINCE—SALUTATIONS OF THE CROWD—THEGUZLA—MONTENEGRIN DANCE—THE PRINCE'S ACCOUNTOF ITS ORIGIN—THE CAMP AT NIGHT—ADVENTURE WITH AMONTENEGRIN—DEVOTION OF THE PEOPLE TO THEIRPRINCE235
CHAPTER XVIII.
FALSE IMPRESSIONS OF MONTENEGRO—AGRICULTURE ON AMINOR SCALE—FIELD-LABOURERS—MONTENEGRIN FACCHINIAT CONSTANTINOPLE—FEMALE LABOUR—PRODUCTION OFSUMACH—COMMERCIAL RELATIONS WITH OTHER COUNTRIESIMPEDED—IMPOSING PAGEANT248xiii
CHAPTER XIX.
FOOT RACES—MONASTERY OF OSTROG—OTTOMAN ADMINISTRATION—ACOURSE À LA MONTAGNE—RACING WITHOUT BETTING—BENTROVATO—A FLAT RACE—CONVERSATION ABOUTENGLISH LAWS AND CUSTOMS—LAW OF HABEAS CORPUS258
CHAPTER XX.
DEPARTURE FROM CETTIGNE—RUGGED ROAD—DELIGHTFULVIEW—USEFUL OLD HELMET—NIEGOSH—EXCESSIVE HEAT—THESCALA DI CATTARO—THE BOCCHESI—THE RUSSIANCONSUL—SUNSET AT CATTARO—UNEXPECTED APPEARANCEOF PERO PEJOVICH268
CHAPTER XXI.
BEAUTIFUL ROAD—ATTACK OF FEVER—ARRIVAL AT BUDUA—BARONHEYDEG AND SIGNOR MARCO MEDIN—A RESTAURANT—OURHOST—DOCTOR, DENTIST AND APOTHECARY—WALKROUND THE FORTIFICATIONS—EXPLORATION OF BUDUA—THEPARTING GLASS280
CHAPTER XXII.
TOWN OF ANTIVARI—FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF TURKEY—ORIENTALPASSENGERS—VALUE OF A KNOWLEDGE OF ARABIC ORTURKISH—A MAHOMETAN MERCHANT AND HIS FAMILY—TURKISHTROOPS IN ALBANIA—TOWN AND FORTRESS OFCASTEL DURAZZO—RETURN TO TRIESTE—FAREWELL TO THEREADER291

1

Decoration

RAMBLES IN ISTRIA, DALMATIA,
AND
MONTENEGRO.


CHAPTER I.

A CONVERSATION—WHERE SHALL WE GO FOR A HOLIDAY TRIP—ATTRACTIONSOF LAPLAND—REMINISCENCES OF ITALY—THEGRAND TOUR IN FORMER DAYS—HOW TO STUDY HISTORY—DIFFICULTYOF FINDING NEW GROUND FOR TRAVEL—ANINTERESTING COUNTRY WITHIN FIVE DAYS OF TEMPLE BAR.

"LET us go to Lapland!" was theexclamation which rang on my ear,as I was entering my club, onefine morning in the early part of June, 1873.

"Lapland!" said I, "what put that into yourhead?"2

"Yes," replied my friend M—, in his rich, good-humouredvoice, slightly flavoured with HibernianDoric. "I hear that somebody has written abook about it. I have been everywhere elsein Europe—and it is quite the place to go tonow, you know. We shall pic-nic on Cape Northand then drive across to Spitzbergen in reindeersledges on the ice, it will be awfully jolly!"and his joyous laugh echoed through the hall."Do come, like a good fellow," said he, "therewill be just the four of us, R—, C—, yourself,and I, and you really must not say no, forwe none of us can speak a word of anythingbut English, while you speak every languageunder the sun. So agree to it at once; let usall meet here to dinner, to-morrow at six, and thenoff by the mail to Calais."

At first I thought that M— was chaffing;but having now been joined by R— andC—, who at once chimed in on the samesubject, I said,

"Have you any idea about Lapland, mydear M—, do you know anything about it?and what do you expect to see there?"3

"Oh, dear me, yes," replied he, "it is acountry in the North of Europe, surrounded onall sides either by land or by water, and inhabitedby men who are four feet six high, and thedarlingest little women just four feet nothing.They go to church on Sundays, riding on reindeer,and shoot Polar bears with bows andarrows! Oh dear, yes, I know all about Lapland."

"Not at all a bad account," said I, "butwhat writes Captain Hutchinson in his book?Is his description of Lapland very captivating?"

"Well," answered M—, "I confess I havenot read his book; but go abroad I must,London is getting too stupid, and I have beeneverywhere else in Europe; and I want to seea country out of the beaten track, something Ihave not yet seen."

"Now, my dear fellow," said I, "though Ihave not been exactly in Lapland, I have beenin Finland, and that, you know, is just nextdoor to it; and knowing what the mosquitoesare in those swampy northern latitudes, nothing4could induce me to visit those countries againin Summer, except for very cogent reasonsindeed. But come now, tell me where haveyou been, that you say you have seen everyother country in Europe?"

"Well," answered M—. "I have been twiceto Italy, up and down, and done it as thoroughlyas any man could do it. I have been—"

"Stop a wee," said I, "how have you doneItaly? let me see, suppose we just begin in themiddle, let us take Florence—no doubt youwere there."

"Oh dear, yes, and such a jolly place, whereone could live and love for ever! oh, yes,

"'Of all the fairest cities of the world,

None is so fair as Florence!'

"If it were not for the heat, and having beenthere twice already, it would beat going to seethe sun at midnight, which we shall see inLapland, old fellow. We shall see the sungoing right round the horizon, neither risingnor setting—not a bit—but going just asin the old riddle we had when we werechildren, 'going round and round the house, and5never touching the house.' So now no more'shirking and lurking,' but let's be off toLapland, and if there are a few mosquitoes, wecan take plenty of flea-powder to protect us;there now, I'll stand the flea-powder—a wholepound's worth," and the laugh of that excellentfellow rings in my ears still.

Here R— joined in the conversation; he hadnever been to Italy, and his curiosity was raisedby the enthusiastic expressions of my friendM—, in regard to Florence.

"Do tell us something about that place,where you could live and love for ever," saidhe.

"Well, what can I tell you?" replied M—."Florence was the capital of Tuscany, and issituated on the banks of the river Arno, and itis a most delightful place. What more do youwant? There is the charming Mrs. —, andher equally charming daughter, whose house opensjust as the opera closes; and once there, onenever thinks of leaving till three o'clock inthe morning at soonest. Then there are theCascine, the Café Doney, and the club, and my6friend G. M—y; and then the churches andthe galleries, and the pietre dure, &c., &c., Idid every one of them."

"Where did you go when you left Florence?"

"To Rome, naturally."

"So all you know about Tuscany and CentralItaly resolves itself into the Cascine, the CaféDoney, and our friend G. M—y. Did younot even visit Siena on your way to Rome?"

"No, for, being fond of the sea, I went toRome by Civita Vecchia."

"When you were at Civita Vecchia, did it notcome into your head to visit the birth-place ofthe Tarquins—Corneto? only a short drive fromCivita Vecchia, and one of the most interestingplaces in Italy."

"I never even heard of it," said M—.

I was going to say ex uno disce omnes, this ishow la jeunesse doré of the present time travel onthe continent—to finish their education, by the way!but my remark would be of too sweeping acharacter, for there are many exceptions to be metwith occasionally. Still, though travelling is multiplieda thousand-fold compared with what it used to7be even only a century ago, it is doubtful, I think,if travelling is as fruitful of good results in ourdays as it used to be in the days of our grandfathers,when, under the guidance of a well qualifiedtutor, young men used to take the "grandtour" with a view to completing their education,the foundation and groundwork of which had beenlaid first in our public schools, and then inour great universities. Now my friend M—was a charming fellow, well educated to a certainpoint, pleasant, agreeable, and good-tempered; hehad travelled a good deal, and yet I may safelysay he had seen nothing, and simply because hehad not prepared himself for travelling with aview to thoroughly seeing the countries he intendedvisiting, and obtaining the information they couldbestow. And how many are there that just travelin the same way! How many are there amongthose who yearly flood the approaches to theEternal City who do

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