What a Young Wife Ought to Know

What a Young Wife Ought to Know
Title: What a Young Wife Ought to Know
Release Date: 2018-06-26
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 9
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 29

[1]

Pure Books on Avoided Subjects

Books for Men

By Sylvanus Stall, D. D.

  • “What a Young Boy Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Young Man Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Young Husband Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Man of 45 Ought to Know.”

Books for Women

By Mrs. Mary Wood-Allen, M. D.,
And Mrs. Emma F. A. Drake, M. D.

  • “What a Young Girl Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Young Woman Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Young Wife Ought to Know.”
  • “What a Woman of 45 Ought to Know.”

PRICE AND BINDING

The books are issued in uniform size and butone style of binding, and sell in America at $1, inGreat Britain at 4s., net, per copy, post free,whether sold singly or in sets.

PUBLISHED BY

IN THE UNITED STATES
THE VIR PUBLISHING COMPANY
2237 Land Title Building Philadelphia

IN ENGLAND
THE VIR PUBLISHING COMPANY
7 Imperial Arcade, Ludgate Circus, London, E.C.

IN CANADA
WILLIAM BRIGGS
29-33 Richmond Street West Toronto, Ontario


[2]

EMMA F. ANGELL DRAKE, M.D.


[3]

Price $1.00 net
4s. net

PURITY AND TRUTH

WHAT A YOUNG
WIFE
OUGHT TO KNOW

(THOUSAND DOLLAR PRIZE BOOK)

BY
Mrs. EMMA F. ANGELL DRAKE, M. D.

Graduate of Boston University MedicalCollege; formerly Physician and Principalof Mr. Moody’s School at Northfield,Mass.; Professor of Obstetrics at DenverHomœopathic Medical School and Hospital;Author of “What a Woman of 45Ought to Know,” “Maternity WithoutSuffering.”

Philadelphia, Pa.: 2337 Land Title Building.

THE VIR PUBLISHING COMPANY

London:
7, Imperial Arcade,
Ludgate Circus, E. C.

Toronto:
Wm. Briggs,
33 Richmond St., West.

[4]

Copyright, 1901, by SYLVANUS STALL

Copyright, 1902, by SYLVANUS STALL

Entered at Stationers’ Hall, London, England

Protected by International copyright in Great Britain and allher colonies, and, under the provisions of the Berne Convention,in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland,Tunis, Hayti, Luxembourg, Monaco, Norway, and Japan

All rights reserved

[PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES]


[5]

Dedicated
To the Young Wives Who Desire the Best
for Themselves, for their Husbands
and for their Offspring

[6]


[7]

PREFACE

To this generation as to no other, are weindebted for the awakening of woman. Notthe awakening alone which has led her outof the old lines into nearly every avenue opento man in his pursuit of the necessities andluxuries of life; but that other and largerawakening which has set her down face toface with herself, and in her study of womanshe has shown herself courageous.

Bravely acknowledging her own limitations,she has set herself the task of fortifyingthe weak points, curbing the more daring aspirations,and getting herself into trim, so tospeak, that she may traverse the sea of life,without danger to herself, her cargo, or toany of the countless ships which follow in herwake, or that pass her in the day or the night.

Not all women have yet awakened, and forthose who have eyes to see, and have seen, agreat work is still waiting to be done. Theymust reach out and rouse their sisters. Will[8]they do it? With our young wives rests theweal or woe of the future generations. Tothem we say, “What of the future, and whatsort of souls shall you give to it?”

Emma F. A. Drake.

Denver, Colorado,
United States of America.
February 1st, 1901.


[9]

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
INTELLIGENCE OF THE YOUNG WIFE.
Out of girlhood into wifehood.—The setting up of a new home.—Woman’s exalted place.—Earlier influences.—Importance of intelligence.—Woman fitted by creator for wifehood and motherhood.—The position of reproductive organs in the body.—Dangers of crowding contents of abdomen.—What all young wives need to know.—Premium previously set upon ignorance.—Heredity.—Failures and successes of our ancestors.—Faults and virtues transmitted through heredity, 21-35
CHAPTER II.
HOME AND DRESS.
Preparations for successful home-makers.—The importance of sensible dress.—An opportunity for reform.—The conditions of attractive dress.—A question of healthfulness.—What wives need to know concerning dress.—The kind to be avoided.—Injurious dress destroying the race.—The ailments caused by wrong dressing.—The corset curse.—A summary of the evils of dress, 37-46
[10]CHAPTER III.
HEALTH OF THE YOUNG WIFE.
Health insures happiness.—Be ambitious for health.—The scarcity of perfectly healthy women.—Fashion to the Rescue.—The boon of health.—Necessity of ventilation and fresh air.—Duties to the home.—The greatness of woman’s sphere.—In the society drift.—The extreme of wholly avoiding society.—Keeping in the middle of the road.—Pleasures and recreations taken together.—Taking time to keep young.—Mistakes which some husbands make.—Wrecks at the beginning of married life, 47-55
CHAPTER IV.
THE CHOICE OF A HUSBAND.
Higher standards are being set up in the choice of a husband.—Should be worthy of both love and respect.—Love likely to idealize the man.—The real characteristics necessary.—Deficiencies in character not to be supplied after marriage.—The right to demand purity.—Young men who “sow wild oats.”—Importance of good health.—Weaknesses and diseases which descend from parents to children.—The parents’ part in aiding to a wise choice.—The value of the physician’s counsel.—One capable of supporting wife and children.—A dutiful son makes a good husband.—Essential requisites enumerated.—The father reproduced in his children.—The equivalents which the wife should bring to her husband, 57-64
[11]CHAPTER V.
WHAT SHALL A YOUNG WIFE EXPECT TO BE TO HER HUSBAND?
The young wife should seek to be her husband’s equal, but not his counterpart.—The recognized centre of the home.—Woman’s true greatness.—Man’s helpmeet.—Mrs. Gladstone’s part in her husband’s greatness.—Should attract her husband from the club to the home.—Continuing to be attractive in dress and manners.—Should accept both wifehood and motherhood.—Should keep pace with his mental growth.—Guarding against improper use of literary clubs, reading circles, etc.—Solomon’s picture of the model young wife.—A converted heathen’s estimate of his Christian wife, 65-72
CHAPTER VI.
TROUSSEAU AND WEDDING PRESENTS.
Husband and wife ruined before their “crane is hung.”—The foolish and ruinous display at weddings.—An illustration given.—How wedding presents lead to debt and unhappiness.—Living does not need much machinery.—Mistake of copying after people of large wealth.—Wise choice of furniture.—The best adornments for the home.—The trousseaux of our foremothers.—The need of simplicity.—Artificialities that make a veil between our souls and God, 73-78
[12]CHAPTER VII.
THE MARITAL RELATIONS.
The subject approached with reluctance.—The marital state should be the most sacred of sanctuaries.—Wrongly interpreted it is the abode of darkness and sin.—Its influence for good or evil upon character.—Responsibility of mothers for the unhappy lives of their daughters.—Commercial marriages.—Marriage as it should be.—The husband’s danger from “aggressiveness.”—The wife should not provoke the wrongs she suffers.—Marital modesty.—Parenthood the justification of the marital act.—Reproduction the primal purpose.—Harmony of purpose and life.—Love’s highest plane.—The value of continence.—The right and wrong of marriage.—The relation during gestation.—Effects of relation during gestation illustrated.—The wrong-doings of good men.—The fruits of ignorance.—The better day coming, 79-96
CHAPTER VIII.
PREPARATION FOR MOTHERHOOD.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 29
Comments (0)
reload, if the code cannot be seen
Free online library ideabooks.net