» » Sir Edwin Landseer

Sir Edwin Landseer

Sir Edwin Landseer
Category:
Title: Sir Edwin Landseer
Release Date: 2018-07-24
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 90
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 22

[Image ofthe book's cover unavailable.]

1. Contents.
2. List of Illustrations
(In certain versions of this etext [in certain browsers]clicking on the image will bring up a larger version.)
3. Chronology of Edwin Henry Landseer
4. Chronological List of Pictures by Sir Edwin Landseer,Mentioned in this Volume.
5. Index of Names.
(etext transcriber's note)

ILLUSTRATED BIOGRAPHIES OF
THE GREAT ARTISTS.

/////////////////////////

SIR EDWIN HENRY LANDSEER.

/////////////////////////

ILLUSTRATED BIOGRAPHIES
OF THE GREAT ARTISTS.

The following volumes, each illustrated with from 14 to 20 Engravings,
are now ready, price 3s. 6d.

  • LEONARDO DA VINCI. By Dr. J. Paul Richter.
  • MICHELANGELO. By Charles Clement.
  • RAPHAEL. From J. D. Passavant. By N. D’Anvers.
  • TITIAN. By Richard Ford Heath, M.A., Oxford.
  • TINTORETTO. By W. Roscoe Osler. From researches at Venice.
  • HOLBEIN. From Dr. A. Woltmann. By Joseph Cundall.
  • THE LITTLE MASTERS OF GERMANY.[1] By W. B. Scott.
  • REMBRANDT. From Charles Vosmaer. By J. W. Mollett.
  • RUBENS, By C. W. Kett, M.A., Oxford.
  • VAN DYCK and HALS. By Percy R. Head, Lincoln Coll., Oxford.
  • FIGURE PAINTERS OF HOLLAND. By Lord Ronald Gower, F.S.A.
  • VERNET and DELAROCHE. By J. Ruutz Rees.
  • HOGARTH. By Austin Dobson.
  • REYNOLDS. By F. S. Pulling, M.A., Oxford.
  • TURNER. By W. Cosmo Monkhouse.
  • LANDSEER. By Frederick G. Stephens.

The following volumes are in preparation:—

  • FRA ANGELICO. By Catherine M. Phillimore.
  • FRA BARTOLOMMEO. By Leader Scott.
  • VELAZQUEZ. By Edwin Stowe, M.A., Oxford.
  • GAINSBOROUGH. By G. M. Brock Arnold, M.A., Oxford.
  • ALBRECHT DÜRER. By R. F. Heath, M.A.
  • GIOTTO. By Harry Quilter, M.A., Trinity College, Cambridge.

{i} 

{ii} 

{iii} 

[Image unavailable.]

Deerhound’s Heads.

The whole world without Art would be one great wilderness.
————

SIR EDWIN LANDSEER

By FREDERICK G. STEPHENS,
AUTHOR OF “MEMORIALS OF MULREADY,” ETC.


LONDON:
SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE, & RIVINGTON,
CROWN BUILDINGS, FLEET STREET.
1880.
{iv} 
{v}
(All rights reserved.)

TO
HENRY WALLIS, PAINTER,
THE
THANK-OFFERING OF AN
OLD FRIEND.
{vi}
{vii}

PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION.

The text of a former work on the early productions of Sir Edwin Landseerhas been, for the second time, revised and extended by the author; andthe subject has been continued to the death of the artist.

The biographer’s aim is achieved if he has successfully shown the courseof the artist’s studies, and their result in success of an extraordinarykind.

June, 1880.

{viii}

[Image unavailable.]

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
 PAGE
Origin of the Landseer family—Parentage of Edwin Henry Landseer—Thomas Landseer1
CHAPTER II.
Early life—Landseer’s first studio—Etchings—First picture at the Royal Academy—Haydon’s studio16
CHAPTER III.
A fully-developed painter—Early paintings—British Institution—The Cat’s Paw39
CHAPTER IV.
At St. John’s Wood—Chevy Chase—Chief’s Return from Deer-stalking—Made Royal Academician (1830)—Lassie herding sheep58
CHAPTER V.
Suspense—Highland Shepherd Dog—Bolton Abbey—Drover’s departure—Shepherd’s Chief Mourner—Dignity and Impudence—Otters and Salmon—The Sanctuary72
CHAPTER VI.
Windsor Castle in the present time—Not caught yet—The Otter speared—Shoeing—The random shot—Dialogue at Waterloo—Landseer knighted87
CHAPTER VII.
Sir Edwin Landseer—The Monarch of the Glen—Midsummer Night’s Dream—Maid and Magpie—The Flood in the Highlands94
CHAPTER VIII.
Man proposes, God disposes—The Connoisseurs—The Swannery invaded—Closing Years—Death of Landseer105
[Image unavailable.]

{x}

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

From Etchings by Edwin Landseer and C. G. Lewis.

 PAGE
1.Dogs worrying a Frog. Etched by Edwin Landseer (1822),xii
2.Low Life. ” ” ” (1822),7
3.A Shepherd’s Dog. ” ” ” (1824),13
4.The Beggars. ” ” ” (1824),19
5.Donkeys on a Common. ” ” ” (1824),25
6.Four Irish Greyhounds. ” ” ” (1825),Front.
7.Eagle and Red Deer. ” ” ” (1825),31
8.The Rabbit Warren. ” ” ” (1826),37
9.Return from Deer-Stalking. ” ” ” (1826),43
The Mothers. Drawn by Edwin Landseer in 1837.
10.Highland Nurse. Etched by C. G. Lewis (1847)49
11.Mare and Foal. ” ” ” (1847),55
12.Dog and Pups. ” ” ” (1847),61
13.Cow and Calf. ” ” ” (1847),69
14.Donkey and Foal. ” ” ” (1847),77
15.Goat and Kids. ” ” ” (1847),85
16.Sow and Pigs. ” ” ” (1847),93
17.Sheep and Lambs. ” ” ” (1847),101

The head and tail pieces are from Etchings by Edwin Landseer for theGame Card at Woburn Abbey (1825).{xi}

CHRONOLOGY OF EDWIN HENRY LANDSEER.

 PAGE
1802Born at 83, Queen Anne Street East16
1812Studied at Hampstead17
1815Exhibited pictures at Royal Academy28
Attended Haydon’s Studio32
1818Exhibited “Fighting Dogs”42
1822Received a premium of £150 from the Directors of the British Institution51
1824First visit to the Highlands55
1825Took the house in St. John’s Wood58
1826Made Associate of the Royal Academy60
1830Made Royal Academician62
1850Knighted93
1859Received the Commission for the Lions for the Nelson Monument108
1860Exhibited “Flood in the Highlands”100
1866The “Lions” were placed in Trafalgar Square108
1869The Swannery invaded108
1873Died October 1st112
Buried in St. Paul’s, October 11th112

{xii}

[Image unavailable.]

DOGS WORRYING A FROG (1822).

{1}

[Image unavailable.]

SIR EDWIN LANDSEER.

CHAPTER I.
ORIGIN AND PARENTAGE.

So much of the family history of this artist as it is needful to repeat,or the reader will care to learn, may be briefly told: it begins withhis grandfather, who was a jeweller settled in London, where, in1761,[2] his father, John Landseer, was born. The senior was on intimateterms with Peter, father of the lawyer and politician, Sir SamuelRomilly. Peter Romilly was descended from a distinguished French family,the first of whom known in this country settled near London after therevocation of the Edict of Nantes, and acquired a fortune as awax-bleacher. This Peter was a jeweller of note and wealth, establishedin Frith Street, Soho, and it is probable that common interest in acraft which is so closely allied to art had much to do with directingthe minds of John, and consequently those of his family, to design. Itis certain that in the early life of Sir Samuel Romilly he{2} gaveconsiderable attention to painting and its sister studies—architecture,and anatomy as applied to the arts. His biographer tells us that thefuture lawyer attended the lectures delivered on these subjects by Dr.William Hunter and James Barry at the Royal Academy, and doubtless thosewhich, as we shall presently see, John Landseer, his friend—for theaffection of the fathers was continued with the sons—pronounced withnoteworthy effect at the Royal Institution. These discourses of JohnLandseer’s, as printed and published at a later date, and entitled“Lectures on the Art of Engraving,” 1807, still supply the body of oneof the best text-books in our language on the principles and practice ofthat art.

How John Landseer became an engraver may not be difficult to understandwhen we recollect that the art which he fortunately illustrated, was,for modern use at least, first exercised if not invented by a jewellerand goldsmith, and that most of the early European artists in gold andjewellery not only worked in their proper crafts, but, for the serviceof the printing-press, incised silver and copper plates with the graverand needle. From Holbein to Stothard, before and since their days, someof the greatest artists have applied their genius to the designing ofjewellery. Hogarth engraved on household plate before he etched or cutcopper to immortal uses. As etchers, or autographic artists on metal,both John Landseer and his son Edwin distinguished themselves.Conversely, the best etchers have been and are painters, from Dürer, andRembrandt, and Van Dyck, to MM. Rajon and Palmer of our own day. Theetchings of our chief subject are among his least known yet mostadmirable works; Thomas, Edwin’s senior, another son of John Landseer,was one of the most eminent engravers of this age.

Observing the ability of his son John, Landseer the jeweller obtainedfor him the assistance of William Byrne, one of the best instructors ofthat period, who,

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 22
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net