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Memoirs of Eighty Years

Memoirs of Eighty Years
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Title: Memoirs of Eighty Years
Release Date: 2018-08-21
Type book: Text
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Memoirs of Eighty Years, by Thomas Gordon Hake

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Title: Memoirs of Eighty Years

Author: Thomas Gordon Hake

Release Date: August 21, 2018 [eBook #57738]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MEMOIRS OF EIGHTY YEARS***

 

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[i]

MEMOIRS OF EIGHTY YEARS.

BY
GORDON HAKE,
PHYSICIAN.

“Could we elude the fiat,—all must die,—
Men would become their own posterity.”
Imprimatur of Richard Bentley and Son

LONDON:
RICHARD BENTLEY AND SON,
Publishers in Ordinary to Her Majesty the Queen.
1892.

(All rights reserved.)

[ii]


[iii]

CONTENTS.

PAGE
I.
My birth and parentage—My education, beginning eighty-four years ago, still incomplete—Death of my father 1
II.
Obscure origin of Hakes and Gordons 3
III.
My sister and my brother—Mischief, a sign of health in children—Friendship, a graft that can only be made while we are growing 6
IV.
My aunt Wallinger—My vivid memory—Our relations in Yorkshire, the Rimington family—My mother’s uncles, the Clarkes 8
V.
The Clarkes and the Pollocks—William Clarke a governor of St. Paul’s and of Christ’s Church Schools—He gave Sir Frederick Pollock a presentation to the one and me to the other. My first school-days at Hertford, and how after measles and scarlet fever I was sent [iv]home in order to die 11
VI.
My rapid recovery and return to mischief after my illness, and the brutal treatment I received from the boys while I was falling sick 15
VII.
From school to Seaford for the holidays, spent by me and my cousin, a Shore, with the Wallingers—The rotten borough, its owners and surroundings—My aunt Shore, a sister of my mother, and the Shore family—Mrs. Wallinger’s despotic kindness to her nephews—Our Denton cousins, the Gwynnes—The Reverend William Gwynne and his lady, also my mother’s sister 17
VIII.
The Gwynne family—Character of Mrs. Gwynne, and of her husband—The training of their offspring 21
IX.
My monastic life in London—The cloisters, the dormitories, the playground—The influence of their history on the boyish mind—I am ordered to fight 24
X.
Influence of Shakespeare and Virgil over me—“Cozing” after bed-time; story-telling; the reading of forbidden books; the novels of the past; the new novel now worn out—The great epochs, all of a transitory duration, except that of religion 27
XI.
The classical masters—The dress of the clergy—The writing masters—The lower officials—steward, beadles—No teaching except Greek, Latin, writing and arithmetic. [v]Religion not taught, only heard 30
XII.
On bishop, priests, and deacons 34
XIII.
Henry William Gordon, my uncle, mixes his blood with that of Enderby, whence sprang a giant of middle stature, Chinese Gordon 36
XIV.
My last holiday spent in the mediæval city of Exeter—The dead weight of the clergy relieved by Yates acting Falstaff—Professor Shelden and his mummy—Squire Northmore and his great discovery—Gifford and his Mastership of the Rolls 39
XV.
Lifelong friendships, their physiology—The king’s ward—Games—Handsome boys, and others 43
XVI.
Boys of some mark—Christ’s unrevisited—Life at Woolwich—Drawing-room manners—Colonel Wylde—Soldiers the best servants 47
XVII.
Seaford revisited—The Wallinger family—A domestic seaside season of relatives and friends not unknown to fortune 50
XVIII.
Vaulting ambition, a retrospect—Gravitation of my mother from west to south—She settled at Lewes—My intellect, dieted on its sense of nothingness, takes growth—The [vi]process of brain-culture, and its accessories 53
XIX.
Youth—Our first recognition of Nature as something more than ourselves—My modesty always in proportion to my ignorance—My early habit of pumping those who knew more than myself—A country town, a cemetery in which great men are buried alive—Gideon Mantell, prince of geologists—Sir John Shelley and Sir George Shiffner, the last of the pigtail wearers—They represent Lewes in those Tory times 56
XX.
A county town has many mansions, in which the small succeed to the great—Mantell, surgeon-apothecary: his struggles—Lord Egremont’s bounty—He removes to Brighton, sells his museum, vanishes again—The liberality of Government to art, but not to science—Minor celebrities of Lewes 59
XXI.
I become a student of medicine under Thomas Hodson, a great operator—The superior skill of the surgeon, who knows exactly what he is about—Hodson’s strange character—His pre-eminence in county practice—Glynde, Lord Hampden, John Ellman, and south-down mutton 62
XXII.
John Ellman, a sketch—The south-down sheep not extinct—Lord Hampden’s funeral—Southover—The three weird sisters—My studies continued in London at St. George’s—Dr. Thomas Young, the greatest of theorists 65
XXIII.
The order of physicians—Halford, Warren, Chambers—The heavy costs of getting to the front of the profession—The [vii]difference between the old and new physicians, how brought about—Dr. James Clark made master of the situation—I become a pupil of Faraday, the eminent lecturer of the day—Family deaths and changes—St. George’s Hospital in the olden time 68
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