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What Norman Saw in the West

What Norman Saw in the West
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Author: Anonymous
Title: What Norman Saw in the West
Release Date: 2018-09-06
Type book: Text
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, What Norman Saw in the West, by Anonymous

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Title: What Norman Saw in the West

Author: Anonymous

Release Date: September 6, 2018 [eBook #57854]

Language: English

Character set encoding: UTF-8

***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WHAT NORMAN SAW IN THE WEST***

 

E-text prepared by Richard Tonsing
and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net)
from page images generously made available by
Internet Archive
(https://archive.org)

 

Note: Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive. See https://archive.org/details/whatnormansawinw00unse

 


 

 

 

2

No. 666.
THE FALLS OF MINNEHAHA.

WHAT NORMAN SAW
IN
THE WEST.

BY THE AUTHOR OF
“FOUR DAYS IN JULY,” AND “A WINTER AT WOODLAWN.”
“Much is my life enriched by the images of the great Niagara, of the vast lakes, and of the heavenly sweetness of the prairie scenes.”—Margaret Fuller.
EIGHT ILLUSTRATIONS.

 

 

New York:
PUBLISHED BY CARLTON & PORTER,
SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859,
BY CARLTON & PORTER,
in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District of New-York.

5

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER   PAGE
 
I. On the Railway 9
 
II. Two Days at Niagara 17
 
III. Children made happy 27
 
IV. The Queen City of the Lake 40
 
V. On the Rock River 54
 
VI. Indian Stories 65
 
VII. Second Day upon the Mississippi 87
 
VIII. Owah-Menah; or the Falling Water 100
 
IX. Down the Mississippi 115
 
X. Fourth Day upon the Mississippi 124
 
XI. A Sunday in Dubuque 134
 
XII. Down the River 138
 
XIII. The Picnic 151
 
XIV. The Camp-meeting 158
 
XV. A Sabbath-day 168
 
6XVI. On the Rail 178
 
XVII. The Prairies 190
 
XVIII. Chicago, and the Ride thither 202
 
XIX. On the Lakes 208
 
XX. Mackinaw and Lake Huron 218
 
XXI. Collingwood 240
 
XXII. A Sunday in Toronto 247
 
XXIII. Once more at Niagara 255
 
XXIV. Home again 263
7

Illustrations.

PAGE
 
Falls of Minnehaha 2
 
New York City 12
 
Prairie du Chien 73
 
Indians killing a white Family 79
 
Maiden’s Rock 93
 
Falls of St. Anthony 103
 
Western Settler’s first Home 175
 
Common Gull 237
9
WHAT NORMAN SAW
IN
THE WEST.

CHAPTER I.
ON THE RAILWAY.

“The black steam-engine! steed of iron power;
The wondrous steed of the Arabian tale,
Launched on its course by pressure of a touch;
Ha! ha! it shouts, as on
It gallops, dragging in its tireless path,
Its load of fire.”

“How still Broadway looks so early inthe morning,” said Norman Lester to hismother, as they drove down the street totake the early train.

It was an unusual sight, the long vistaof the beautiful street in deep shadow,peaceful and calm as if it knew no tramplingfootsteps nor jostling vehicles. It10was just waking up from its brief hourof repose. Here and there a market cart,laden with vegetables, was jogging leisurelyon, then a carriage with travelersand trunks hastened onward. A fewwaiters were standing at the doors of thehotels to speed the parting guests, andpedestrians not ignorant of sunrise andits demands were walking on the broadpavement. Soon the swelling tide of lifewould rush through this great channel; theanxious, earnest brow, the sad and troubledcountenances; light and trifling, andbright and joyous faces, would all be bornedown that mighty stream. Business andpleasure, noise, and hurry, and confusionwould come, as the ascending sun chasedaway the shadows of the great thoroughfare,and with them its brief repose.

Norman’s thoughts went beyond Broadwayand its contrast.

12

No. 666.
NEW YORK CITY

13“I have actually set out on my journeyto the West to see my uncle, a journey Ihave been thinking of for two or threeyears. How I wish you were going withus, Edward,” he said to his tall cousin,whose manliness Norman greatly admired.

“You are to be your mother’s escort to-day,Norman,” replied Edward; “I hopeyou will take good care of her. You aretall enough to make quite a respectableescort, but I have my doubts as to yourcare and thoughtfulness. I think you arerather a heedless boy, but I hope you willcome back greatly improved.”

“There is no saying,” said Norman,“what this journey may do for me.”

“We shall see; but here we are at thedepôt,” was Edward’s reply.

The ferry was crossed, some orangesbought to quiet the noisy demands of theorange woman, seats secured, good-bysaid to Edward, and Norman and hismother were fairly off for a few daysride on the Erie Railroad to Niagara.

14How that terrible, untiring iron horsebore them on; how rapidly was the panoramaof wood and plain, of rock, river,and valley, unrolled before them; how hesnorted and panted, and shot onward,after a short pause now and then to refreshthe mighty giant.

“A little water, and a grasp
Of wood sufficient for its nerves of steel.”

The shifting landscape looked verylovely in the softened lights of that pleasantJune day. The tender green of thefoliage, orchards in full bloom, neat farm-houses,glimpses of the river Passaic, andtheir noble views of a beautiful valley, inthe midst of which rose the spires of PortJervis, lying prettily among the hills, werepresented to the eye and as rapidly withdrawn.Then the scenery became morewild as the train rushed along the highembankment, following the course of theDelaware, and looking down upon itsrapid waters. It is a wild, rugged region;15huge trees, great prostrate trunks, scarredand blackened trophies of the progress ofthe advancing settler wrestling with hisgigantic foes; log-cabins surrounded byunsightly clearings marred with frequentstumps; fields of wheat struggling for existencein the scanty soil; fantastical fencesformed of twisted, gnarled, antler-likeroots. A most picturesque region, whichmight, however, call forth the comment ofthe sturdy Sussex farmer: “Picturesque!I don’t know what you call picturesque;but I say, give me a soil that when youturn it up you have something for yourpains; the fine soil makes the fine country,madam.”

Norman looked with astonishment onthe lofty and massive arches of thebridges over which the railroad crossesthe valley, and had a glimpse of the waterleaping down the ravine at CascadeBridge. A number of men were workingthere on the steep sandy sides of the16cliff, that seemed to afford them a mostperilous

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