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The History Teacher's Magazine, Vol. I, No. 5, January 1910

The History Teacher's Magazine, Vol. I, No. 5, January 1910
Author: Various
Title: The History Teacher's Magazine, Vol. I, No. 5, January 1910
Release Date: 2018-09-13
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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The History Teacher’sMagazine

Volume I.
Number 5.

PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1910.

$1.00 a year
15 cents a copy

CONTENTS.

Page.
INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN HISTORY IN HARVARD COLLEGE, by Prof. Charles H. Haskins95
IMPRESSIONS OF AMERICAN HISTORY TEACHING, by Sara A. Burstall96
“THE OLD SOUTH LEAFLETS” CLASSIFIED, by Rex W. Wells98
MUNICIPAL CIVICS, by Dr. James J. Sheppard99
HAS HISTORY A PRACTICAL VALUE? by Prof. J. N. Bowman103
CALDWELL AND PERSINGER’S “A SOURCE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES”105
EDITORIAL106
AMERICAN HISTORY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL, by Arthur M. Wolfson, Ph.D.107
ASHLEY’S “AMERICAN HISTORY,” reviewed by H. R. Tucker108
ANCIENT HISTORY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL, by William Fairley, Ph.D.109
EUROPEAN HISTORY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL, by D. C. Knowlton, Ph.D.110
HISTORY IN THE GRADES, by Armand J. Gerson112
REPORTS FROM THE HISTORICAL FIELD, by Walter H. Cushing:
The English Historical Association; California Association; New York City Conference; Missouri Society; Bibliography of History for Schools113
CORRESPONDENCE:
Source Methods; School Libraries114

Published monthly, except July and August, by McKinley Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

Copyright, 1909, McKinley Publishing Co.

Entered as second-class matter, October 26, 1909, at the Post-office at Philadelphia, Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879.


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Harding’s Essentials inMediaeval History

By Samuel Bannister Harding, Ph.D., Professor of EuropeanHistory, Indiana University, in consultation withAlbert Bushnell Hart, LL.D., Professorof History, Harvard University

Price, $1.00

This text-book is designed for elementary college classes,having already proved successful as a basis of Freshmaninstruction in Indiana University. It gives a generalsurvey of mediaeval history from Charlemagne to theclose of the fifteenth century. It economizes time withoutsacrificing anything of real importance. The facts to be taughthave been selected with great care. The continuity of the historyhas been preserved from beginning to end, and the fundamentalfeatures of mediaeval life and institutions are clearly brought out.The book affords a clear, scholarly, compact outline, which can befilled in in various ways. At the end of each chapter are suggestivetopics and search topics, and numerous specific references to thebest books for collateral reading. The aim of the book is to beaccurate in substance and definite in statement, to seize the vitaland interesting facts, and as far as possible to give that concretenessof treatment which is necessary in dealing with matters so remoteand alien as those which fill the history of the Middle Ages.

Complete Catalogue of Text-Books in History sent on request

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Books for the History Library

The Wars of Religion in France (1559-1576), TheHuguenots, Catherine de Medici, and Philip II.By James Westfall Thompson. 648 pages,8vo, cloth, net $4.50; postpaid, $4.84.

An authoritative, powerful, and original work based on muchnewly-discovered material and treating the great epoch afterHenry II—the time of Vassy and St. Bartholomew, with new lighton the underlying social and economic causes of the religious conflict.

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Russia and Its Crisis. By Paul Milyoukov.xiv + 589 pages, crown 8vo, net $3.00; postpaid,$3.20.

Broad, liberal, reasonable, and thoroughly informed, ProfessorMilyoukov is one of the foremost thinkers of his nation. His bookis of inestimable value to every student of present-day Russia.Important chapters are those dealing with “The Nationalistic Idea,”“The Religious and Political Traditions,” “The Liberal andSocialistic Ideas,” and “The Urgency of Reform.”

“It is beyond doubt the best, most instructive, and most authoritativework on Russia ever published in English.”—Political ScienceQuarterly.

Dramatic Traditions of the Dark Ages. By JosephS. Tunison. 368 pages, 12mo, cloth, net $1.25;postpaid, $1.36.

“The book is a mine of interesting facts about social, religions,and literary life, as connected with or influencing the stage duringthe centuries of the Christian era. Mr. Tunison has the skill andthe liveliness of method which enable him to marshal this wonderfularray of facts.”—New York Times Saturday Review of Books.

The Legislative History of Naturalization in theUnited States. By Frank George Franklin.x + 308 pages, 12mo, cloth, net $1.50; postpaid,$1.63.

“It is written not to defend or attack any theory of alien’s rights,but it gives clearly and impartially the various acts which have beenpassed by Congress, together with the causes leading to their adoptionand the results following.”—The Interior.

The Development of Western Civilization. AStudy in Ethical, Economic, and PoliticalEvolution. By J. Dorsey Forrest. 420 pages,8vo, cloth, net $2.00; postpaid, $2.17.

“A helpful exposition of the ethical, political, and economicfacts of history in their relation to social evolution.”—The Outlook.

Address
Department 68
The University of Chicago Press
CHICAGO NEW YORK


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The History Teacher’sMagazine

Volume I.
Number 5.

PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1910.

$1.00 a year
15 cents a copy

Introductory Course in History[1]In Harvard College

BY PROFESSOR CHARLES H. HASKINS.

Perhaps the most difficult question whichnow confronts the college teacher of historyis the work of the first year of the collegecourse. The problem is comparatively new,and becomes each year more serious.Twenty-five or thirty years ago the smallamount of history taught in American collegescame in the junior or senior year,and was not organized into any regularcurriculum. With the recent developmentof historical courses, however, the teachingof history has worked down into the sophomoreand often into the freshman year,so that the teacher of the first course inhistory is not only charged with introducingstudents to college work in history, butmust also take his share of the task ofintroducing them to college work in general.At the same time the enlargementof the curriculum and the improvement ofinstruction in history in many of our secondaryschools result in sending to the collegesa body of students who have alreadysome familiarity with history and cannotbe treated in the same way as the greatmass of freshmen. Moreover, the first collegecourse in history in all our larger institutionsattracts a considerable number ofstudents, in some cases as many as fourhundred, so that the management of alarge class adds another element to theproblem; and matters are further complicatedby the fact that while some of thesewill continue their historical studies inlater years, others must get from thiscourse all the historical training which theywill receive in college. I take it that noone pretends to have found the solutionof these difficulties, and that what is atpresent likely to prove helpful is not dogmaticdiscussion so much as a comparisonof the experience of different institutions.

The introductory course at Harvard,History 1, is designed to be useful to thosewhose historical studies are to stop at thispoint, as well as to serve as a basis forfurther study. A period of the world’s historyis chosen which is sufficiently large togive an idea of the growth of institutionsand the nature of historical evolution, yetnot so extensive as to render impossible anacquaintance at close range with some ofthe characteristic personalities and conditionsof the age; and an effort is made tostimulate interest in history and to givesome idea of the nature and purposes ofhistorical study. The field covered is thehistory of Europe, including England, fromthe fourth to the fifteenth centuries. Thisperiod has generally received little or noattention in school, so that students cometo it with a freshness which they could notbring to ancient history or American history,and are introduced to a new worldof action and movement and color whicheasily rouses their interest. The year devotedto the Middle Ages bridges the gapbetween their ancient and modern studies,and not only gives a feeling of historicalcontinuity, but by showing the remoteorigin of modern institutions and cultureit deepens the sense of indebtedness to thepast and furnishes something of the backgroundso much needed in our American life.

Most introductory courses now give considerableattention to the Middle Ages; thepoint of difference is whether the attemptshould be made to cover something of themodern period as well. Where a longerperiod has been chosen, it has been quitegenerally found impracticable in a singleyear to bring the course down to thepresent time, and such courses have ordinarilystopped somewhere in the eighteenthcentury, leaving to a subsequent year thestudy of the more recent period. Thus thecourse which was given at Harvard until1903 stopped at the Treaty of Utrecht.Assuming that two years are necessary forthe satisfactory treatment of mediævaland modern history for the purposes ofthe general student, the question then becomesone as to the point where the breakshall come, and we believe that experienceis in favor of placing this point fairlyearly. The pace should be slower in thefirst year than in the second, so that studentsmay not be confused and hurriedwhile they are learning new methods ofwork and being emancipated from habits ofclose dependence on the text-book. Thereshould be time for reading and assimilation,as well as for thorough drill, in a way thatis not possible when too much ground isgone over. Good training in the first yearmakes it easier to cover a considerableperiod in the second. Such at least hasbeen the experience at Harvard, whereabout half of the students in History 1 goon to the survey of modern history givenin History 2 in the following year, whilemost of the others go directly to modernEnglish history or American history. Itought to be added that while about nine-tenthsof the class of three hundred whoelect History 1 are freshmen, students whohave given a good deal of attention to historyin school are permitted to go on immediatelyto more advanced courses; andfor those who take only American historyin their later years, the introductorycourse in government is accepted as sufficientpreparation.

The class meets three times a week, twicein a body for lectures, and the third hour insections of about twenty. The lectures donot attempt to give a narrative, but seekto bind together the students’ reading, commentupon it, clarify it, reënforce the significantpoints, and discuss special aspectsof the subject. The processes of historicalinterpretation and criticism are illustratedby a few simple examples, and from timeto time the work is vivified by the use oflantern slides. The reading is divided intotwo parts, prescribed and collateral, and indicatedon a printed “List of References”which each member of the class is requiredto buy. The prescribed reading, from seventy-fiveto one hundred pages a week, ismade, as far as possible, the central partof the student’s work. At first this isselected largely from text-books and illustrativesources; later in the year text-booksdrop into the background, and narrativeand descriptive works are taken up,although the student is urged to have athand a manual for consultation and for securinga connected view of events. Theeffort is made to break away from highschool methods of study and to teach studentsto use intelligently larger historicalbooks. Stubb’s “Early Plantagenets,”Jessopp’s “Coming of the Friars,” Bryce’s“Holy Roman Empire,” Brown’s “VenetianRepublic,” Day’s “History of Commerce,”Reinach’s “Apollo,” and Robinson andRolfe’s “Petrarch,” are examples

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