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My Knitting Book (Second Series)

My Knitting Book (Second Series)
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Title: My Knitting Book (Second Series)
Release Date: 2018-10-28
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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MY KNITTING BOOK (SECOND SERIES)

Transcriber’s Note

Variant spelling is retained, however a few changes have been made topunctuation and spacing to make formatting consistent.

Other changes are listed in the note at the end of this book.

Cover
Title Page

MY KNITTING BOOK (SECOND SERIES)
BY MISS LAMBERT
AUTHORESS OF THE HAND-ROOK OF NEEDLEWORK, CHURCHNEEDLEWORK, MY CROCHET SAMPLER, ETC.
TWENTY-THIRD THOUSAND.
LONDON:
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.
1847.


Shortly will be published, by the same Authoress,
Uniform with the present work, and illustrated with Engravings,
price 1s. 6d.
AN ENTIRELY NEW WORK ON
CROCHET,
Forming a Second Series of “My Crochet Sampler.”


Just published,
BY THE SAME AUTHORESS,
A Fifth and cheaper Edition, price 6s. 6d.
THE HAND-BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK
DECORATIVE AND ORNAMENTAL,
INCLUDING ENTIRELY NEW PATTERNS IN CROCHET,
KNITTING AND NETTING,
ILLUSTRATED BY 150 ENGRAVINGS.


PREFACE.


Second Series.


T

The following examples of Knitting—likethose in the former Series—havebeen selected with the greatest care;adhering to the same technical terms,and mode of arrangement.

The writer cannot but feel flattered withthe reception given to the First Series of “MyKnitting Book,” and also to her other volumes onDecorative Needlework:—and she deems that theirgeneral correctness and utility are proved by thetranslations made of them into the Continentallanguages, and by their verbatim republication inAmerica.

iv

Since the publication of the first edition of thepresent series, the whole of the examples have beencarefully reworked, and the faults of the first impressionshave been corrected; yet, it is not to bewondered at, in a work of this description, thaterrors—notwithstanding every precaution—shouldoccasionally creep in. Hence the writer will bemuch indebted for corrections of any mistakes thatmay be discovered by ladies using these books; shecannot, however, attend to anonymous communications,or to such as relate to supposable errors arisingfrom misunderstanding on the part of the Knitter.

3, New Burlington Street,
Regent Street.


v

CONTENTS.


Second Series.


PAGE
INTRODUCTION 9
EXPLANATION OF TERMS USED IN KNITTING 10
THE STANDARD FILIÈRE 15
CABLE PLAIT STITCH FOR A QUILT 16
CENTRE FOR A QUILT, OR BASSINET COVER 17
BORDER FOR A QUILT, OR BASSINET COVER 18
A QUILT IN RAISED STRIPES 20
A BABY’S QUILT IN STRIPES OF ALTERNATE COLOURS 21
ANOTHER QUILT 22
A CARRIAGE SOCK 22
A LADY’S TRAVELLING CAP 25
A BABY’S HOOD IN PLAIN KNITTING 30
A WARM SQUARE SHAWL 31
A SHAWL IN RAISED KNITTING 32
A VANDYKE EDGINGvi 34
INSERTION LEAF PATTERN FOR TIDIES 36
VANDYKE AND OPEN PATTERN FOR A TIDY, ETC. 38
OPEN STRIPE PATTERN FOR A TIDY, ETC. 39
ANOTHER TIDY 40
FEATHER PATTERN FOR A TIDY 41
SMALL ROSE-LEAF PATTERN FOR A TIDY 42
POINT DE L’ECHELLE FOR A TIDY, ETC. 43
A FISH OR BASKET NAPKIN 45
FERN PATTERN FISH NAPKIN 47
OPEN PATTERN FOR A SMALL QUILT 49
PRETTY OPEN STITCH FOR A BAG 49
A NEW PENCE JUG, OR PURSE 50
AN EASY STITCH FOR VARIOUS PURPOSES 53
A CHANCELIÈRE 54
A WARM HALF SQUARE SHAWL 56
FRINGE FOR A SHAWL 57
A SET OF TWELVE BORDERED D’OYLEYS 58
A BORDER FOR EACH D’OYLEY 60
I. —WILLOW PATTERN 61
II. —MOSAIC PATTERN 63
III. —CABLE PATTERN 66
IV. —SCALLOP PATTERNvii 67
V. —WEDGE PATTERN 72
VI. —ZIGZAG PATTERN 76
VII. —DIAPER PATTERN 80
VIII. —TRELLIS PATTERN 81
IX. —PAGODA PATTERN 83
X. —CHECK PATTERN 85
XI. —ROCKET PATTERN 86
XII. —FAN PATTERN 87
A WARM HABIT SHIRT 89
A SOFA PILLOW IN RAISED LOOPS 93
NEW CROSS-STITCH PATTERN 95
BORDER FOR A QUILT 96
OLIVE LEAF PATTERN BAG 97
PINE APPLE PATTERN BAG 101
A BABY’S BONNET 103
A POLKA RIDING, OR YACHT, JACKET 104
A MUFF 108
A GENTLEMAN’S STRONG PURSE 109
ŒILLET PATTERN PURSE 109
ANOTHER STRONG PURSE 110
STAR PATTERN FOR SHETLAND KNITTING 111
LEAF PATTERN FOR SHETLAND KNITTINGviii 113
AN EDGING 116
ANOTHER EDGING 118
AN INSERTION 118
A CARRIAGE BOLSTER 119
A DEEP AND HANDSOME BORDER 121
ANOTHER PRETTY SHETLAND PATTERN 122

Miss Lambert’s Standard Filière, which is Copyright, may be procuredat every respectable Wool Warehouse in the kingdom.


9

MY KNITTING BOOK.


SECOND SERIES.


Introduction.

I

It has been justly observed that,“an art cannot be taught but byits proper terms.” In the art ofknitting, various terms have beenemployed—whether correctly, ornot, it is here needless to inquire—todesignate the same simple process.Confusion has necessarilybeen the result. Those who are accustomedto follow the technicalities of one writer onknitting, are not unfrequently perplexed tocomprehend the directions of another, howeverclearly and concisely they may be laiddown. Hence, in the first series of the pre10senttreatises, the writer confined herself tothe use of the technical terms most generallyemployed by adepts in the art, and which appearedto be those most easy of comprehension.The following directions, therefore,will be conveyed in the same phraseology;but, for ease of reference, and for the use ofthose who may not possess the former series,it has been deemed expedient to repeat the—

Explanation of Terms used in Knitting.

To cast on.—To make the first interlacementof the thread on the needle.

To cast off.—To knit two stitches, and topass the first over the second, and so on, to thelast stitch, which is to be secured by drawingthe thread through.

To pearl.—To knit a stitch with the threadbefore the needle.

To narrow.—To lessen, by knitting twostitches together.

11

To widen.—To increase by making a stitch,bringing the cotton round the needle, andknitting the same when it occurs.

A Turn.—Two rows in the same stitch,backwards and forwards.

A Row.—The stitches from one end of theneedle to the other.

A Round.—A row, when the stitches are ontwo, three, or more needles.

A plain Row.—That composed of simpleknitting.

To pearl a Row.—To knit with the threadbefore the needle.

To rib.—To work alternate rows of plain,and pearl, knitting.

To bring the thread forward.—To make astitch, by bringing the thread forward, aftera knitted stitch.

To pass the thread over.—To make a stitch,by passing the thread over the needle, after apearled stitch.

12

To make a stitch.—If after a knitted stitch,this is done by bringing the thread forward;—ifafter a pearled stitch,—by passing the threadover.—To make a stitch between two pearledstitches, the thread must be turned round theneedle; that is,—passed over the needle, andbrought again in front; but, to make a stitchbetween a pearled stitch and a knitted stitch,—thethread must only be passed over theneedle.

To turn the thread round the needle.—Ifthe thread is before the needle, to pass it overthe needle, and bring it again in front.

To bring the thread forward twice.—Tobring the thread forward, and then, by turningit round the needle, to bring it forward again.

To increase.—To make a stitch.

To decrease.—To knit two stitches, takentogether, in one.

To knit two together.—To knit two stitches,taken together, in one.

13

Knitting and pearling in the same row.—Whenthe stitch, next after a pearled stitch, isto be knitted, it is obvious that the threadmust be passed back under the needle, beforethis can be done;—in like manner, when astitch is to be pearled, after a knitted stitch,the thread must be brought in front under theneedle;—processes, however, very differentfrom those of passing the thread over, andbringing the thread forward, both of whichare for the purpose of making a stitch, andare done above the needle.

To slip, or pass a stitch.—To change it fromone needle to the other, without knitting it.

To fasten on.—The best way to fasten on,is to place the two ends contrariwise, and knita few stitches with both together: but, whenknitting with silk, or fine cotton, a weaver’sknot will be found the best.

A Loop Stitch.—Made by bringing thethread before the needle, which, in knitting14the succeeding stitch, will again take its ownplace.

Pearl, seam, and rib-stitch.—All signify thesame.

It appears

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