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London Cries & Public Edifices

London Cries & Public Edifices
Category:
Title: London Cries & Public Edifices
Release Date: 2018-11-20
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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LONDON CRIES
&
Public Edifices

[Image of the book's title-page unavailable.]

by
LVKE
LIMNER
ESQ

GRANT AND GRIFFITH.

SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS

1 CORNER OF SAINT PAUL’S CHURCH-YARD, LONDON.

1851.

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[Image unavailable: THE TOWER OF LONDON.POTS & KETTLES TO MEND, BELLOWS TO MEND.]
THE TOWER OF LONDON.
POTS & KETTLES TO MEND, BELLOWS TO MEND.

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POTS AND KETTLES TO MEND!—COPPER OR BRASS TO MEND!

The Tinker is swinging his fire-pot to make it burn, having placed hissoldering-iron in it, and is proceeding to some corner or post, there torepair the saucepan he carries.—We commence with the most interestingedifice in our capital,

THE TOWER OF LONDON;

the fortress, the palace, and prison, in which so many events, connectedwith the history of our country, have transpired. The building with fourtowers in the centre is said to have been erected by William theConqueror, and is the oldest part of the fortress. The small bell-towerin the front of our picture is that of the church of St. Peter’s, (thetower being a parish itself,) on the Tower Green, erected in the reignof Edward I. Our view is taken from Tower Hill, near which was thescaffold on which so many have fallen. To the left of the picture stoodthe grand storehouse of William III., destroyed by fire, Nov. 1841.

The Regalia is deposited here, and exhibited to the public, as is alsothe Horse Armoury. The present constable of the Tower is the Duke ofWellington.{2}

RHUBARB!—FINE TURKEY RHUBARB!

This drug is carried about for sale by Turks, often habited in thecostume of their country. They are Turkish Jews, as Mahomedans seldomtravel. The mode of fixing his caftan also indicates him to be one; itis fastened on the left: the Turks make a distinction by adjustingtheirs on the right.

THE EAST INDIA HOUSE

is situated in Leadenhall Street: it was built in 1726, and afterwardsenlarged, in 1798, by Mr. Jupp, who erected the present front, thepediment of which, by Bacon, exhibits an allegory of the Company, underthe protection of George III.: on the apex is a statue of Britannia; onthe right hand is a figure of Asia, and on the left one of Europe. Hereis conducted all the official business relating to the Company, whichnow rules a population of 85,000,000 natives of India, besides51,000,000 who are directly or indirectly affected by them. It containsa Library and Museum, open to the public, free, on Saturdays.

[Image unavailable: THE EAST-INDIA HOUSE.RHUBARB.]
THE EAST-INDIA HOUSE.
RHUBARB.
[Image unavailable: THE BANK OF ENGLAND.MATCHES.]
THE BANK OF ENGLAND.
MATCHES.

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MATCHES!—BUY A BOX OF MATCHES OF A POOR GIRL!

Of all the poor itinerants of London the Match-sellers are the poorest,and subsist as much by donations as by the sale of their wares. The oldmatch, a splinter of wood, with ends dipped in brimstone, is fastdisappearing before the modern lucifer or congreve. The poor creaturehere represented is appealing to a lady and gentleman, (whose shadowsare seen in the picture,) on their way to the

BANK OF ENGLAND.

This great national establishment was erected in 1788 by Sir John Soane:it covers about eight acres of ground, and consists of nine open courts,almost all the rooms being on the ground-floor, lighted from above,beneath which are very extensive cellars, used for the deposit ofbullion. This building is raised on the course of the ancient stream ofWall-Brook. In the Pay-Hall, where the notes are issued and exchanged,is a marble statue of William III., founder of the Bank, by Cheere. TheCourt-Room windows overlook a piece of ground, laid out as a garden:this was formerly the churchyard of St. Christopher’s; nearly the wholeof this parish is within the walls of the Bank, the church having beenremoved in 1780, after the riots. The Bank of England is isolated fromall other buildings, and fire-proof.{4}

ORANGES!—BUY ORANGES AND LEMONS!

Here is a poor Irish boy endeavouring to dispose of his oranges to somepassengers outside an omnibus, in Cornhill, near the

ROYAL EXCHANGE.

The merchants used, in olden times, to meet in Lombard Street, until SirThomas Gresham built the first edifice here, in 1567, from the designsof Henrick, a Fleming, who, it is said, made constant journeys fromLondon to Flanders, to obtain materials and workmen. All the stone,slate, iron, wainscot, and glass, came from Antwerp; so that the firstExchange might be considered a Dutch building. This pile was burnt downat the Fire of London, in 1666, and a second Exchange was built on theold site, by Gernan, the first stone of which was laid by Charles II.,and was completed in 1669, at an expense of £59,000, and was againdestroyed by fire in 1838. The present edifice occupies the same spot,of which Prince Albert laid the first stone; and it was opened, withgreat display, by her Majesty, Queen Victoria, in October, 1844, duringthe mayoralty of Sir W. Magnay. It is from a design by William Tite; thepediment, seen in the drawing, is by R. Westmacott, Jun.

[Image unavailable: THE ROYAL EXCHANGE.ORANGES, SWEET ST:MICHAEL ORANGES.]
THE ROYAL EXCHANGE.
ORANGES, SWEET ST:MICHAEL ORANGES.
[Image unavailable: THE MANSION HOUSE.BUY A CAGE FOR YOUR FINE SINGING BIRD.]
THE MANSION HOUSE.
BUY A CAGE FOR YOUR FINE SINGING BIRD.

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BUY A CAGE FOR YOUR FINE SINGING-BIRD!

These little prisons are principally manufactured and sold byforeigners, who have them of all sizes and shapes (to suit the natureand habits of the little captive melodists).

THE MANSION-HOUSE

is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London during hismayoralty; it is situated at the west end of Cornhill, in Mansion-HouseStreet.

When it was first resolved, by the Common Council, to build theMansion-House, Lord Burlington sent a design of Palladio, for theirapprobation and adoption. The first question in court was, not as to theapplicability of the plan, but as to whether Palladio was a freeman ofthe city or no. Some discussion ensued, and a member rose, stating itlittle mattered, as it was notorious that Palladio was a Papist, andincapable as a matter of course. Lord Burlington’s proposal wasrejected, and the design of a freeman and Protestant adopted. Thearchitect was originally a shipwright, and it has been likened to adeep-laden Indiaman. The portico is supported by six Corinthian columns.On the pediment is an allegory of the wealth of London. Here the LordMayor holds his court, as chief magistrate of the city. It was erectedin 1753.{6}

OLD CHAIRS TO MEND!—RUSH OR CANE BOTTOMS—OLD CHAIRS TO MEND!

This artificer does not necessarily pay much rent for workshops, as hecommences operations with his canes or rushes up the nearest court orgateway; or, if the chairs are not wanted in a great hurry, askspermission to take them home, that he may work them in his back-roomwith more convenience, returning them to their owners when he next comeshis rounds.

THE OLD COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, WARWICK LANE,

was erected in 1674, from designs by Sir Christopher Wren, and consistsof a quadrangular court. The room over the gateway, surmounted by acupola and crowned with a ball, was the Lecture Theatre. In thecourt-yard, which has been roofed in, and is now used as a butchers’market, are statues of Charles II. and Sir J. Cutler. The building isnow occupied by a coppersmith. Warwick Lane is chiefly tenanted byslaughtermen and carcase-butchers, being near to Newgate Market. Ourview is taken from Paternoster Row, the literary mart of the world. Thenew College of Physicians is situated in Pall Mall East.

[Image unavailable: OLD COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS WARWICK LANE.OLD CHAIRS TO MEND.]
OLD COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS WARWICK LANE.
OLD CHAIRS TO MEND.
[Image unavailable: SMITHFIELD.ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL, CHURCH, & CATHEDRAL OF SAINT PAUL.CAT’S MEAT DOGS MEAT.]
SMITHFIELD.
ST. BARTHOLOMEW’S HOSPITAL, CHURCH, & CATHEDRAL OF SAINT PAUL.
CAT’S MEAT DOGS MEAT.

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CATS’ MEAT!—DOGS’ MEAT!

The food for these domestic animals is sold about London from barrows orsmall carts, and consists generally of the flesh of horses. As thevendor approaches, the cats or dogs bound out at the well-known cry,often forming such a group as we have here, in

SMITHFIELD;

which is the only cattle market in London. It was formerly situated justwithout the city walls. It has been used as a cattle market since 1150,and was then, as we have stated, in the fields, but is now in the veryheart of London. Our view was taken on Friday afternoon, during thehorse market. Hay and straw are sold here on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, andSaturdays. In the background may be seen the tower of the church of St.Bartholomew the Less, and the entrance to Bartholomew’s Hospital: thepresent building was erected in 1730. Immediately above the gateway ofthe hospital is seen the dome of

ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL,

for a nearer view of which we turn to the title-page. It was built bySir Christopher Wren, on the site of the former, (burnt in the greatfire,) and cost £736,000: it took thirty-five years building, theexpenses of which were raised by a duty on coals.{8}

DUST OH!—DUST OH!

The costume of the Dustman bears a strong resemblance to that of thecoalheaver, who appears to be of the same family, probably through theirboth being connected with the same material, the one before it is burnt,the other after. They formerly rang a bell to intimate their approach,but made so much noise therewith, as to cause the legislature tointerfere, prohibiting its use.

ST. JOHN’S GATE, CLERKENWELL.

This building is the only relic of that once powerful military order ofmonks, St. John of Jerusalem. The priory was established about 1100, butit was forty years after this that they became a military order, and thenoblest of the time sought admission into its ranks. In the thirteenthcentury they were said to possess thirteen thousand manors, in variousChristian lands. The house was suppressed by Henry VIII., who used it asa military storehouse. In the reign of James I. the gate was given toSir Roger Wilbraham. Here, in 1730, Cave printed the “Gentleman’sMagazine,” which still bears a view of the gate on its cover; it is nowused as a public-house, and called the Old Jerusalem Tavern. It haslately been partially restored by voluntary subscriptions.

[Image unavailable: ST JOHNS GATE, CLERKENWELL.DUST O!!!
ST JOHNS GATE, CLERKENWELL.
DUST O!!!
[Image unavailable: TEMPLE BAR.BUY A LACE OF THE POOR BLIND.]
TEMPLE BAR.
BUY A LACE OF THE POOR BLIND.

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PITY THE POOR BLIND!

The blind must gain a livelihood, as well as those who are blest withsight; but, alas! how few are the arts which can be performed by one sobereft: hence the necessity of an appeal to the benevolent—“Pity thepoor blind!” He sells cabbage-nets, kettle-holders, or laces, doubtlessthe work of his own hands in the evenings, which we term “blindman’sholiday.”—We are proceeding along Fleet Street, soon to pass under

TEMPLE BAR,

which is the only remaining city gate. It was built in 1670, by SirChristopher Wren, after the great fire. On this, the city side, arestatues of James and Anne of Denmark; on the other are Charles I. andII. The gate is now only closed on such occasions as the Queen going instate to the city, when she is not admitted until the pursuivant hasknocked and permission been granted by the Lord Mayor.

On the top of this gate were formerly exhibited the heads of traitors:the last exposed here were those of persons who suffered after therebellion of 1745.

Horace Walpole, in a letter dated 16th Aug., 1746, says,

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