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The Knitting Book

The Knitting Book
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Title: The Knitting Book
Release Date: 2018-11-24
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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THE KNITTING BOOK.


I 

THE
KNITTING BOOK.
BY
MDLLE. RIEGO DE LA BRANCHARDIERE.

THIRD EDITION.

LONDON:
SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.,
ACKERMANN & CO., STRAND; OLIVER AND BOYD, EDINBURGH;
AND ALL THE BERLIN WAREHOUSES.

1848.


IILadies are respectfully informed that these articles cannot be purchased without the registeredmark being affixed; and parties wishing to manufacture them for the purposes of sale, musthave the authoress’s permission.


WILKINSON & CO., PRINTERS, 1, BARTLETT’S COURT, HOLBORN HILL.


i

PREFACE.

It is usually considered necessary to introduce works of anydescription, however trifling, with a few prefatory remarks. Happilythe days of dedication are nearly at their close, and an author hasnow only to direct the attention of the reader to any particularleading features.

I trust that my endeavours in this Knitting Book, in theelementary instructions contained, with the full explanation of termsand carefully executed illustrations, are conveyed with adistinctiveness, easily to be comprehended by the learner. The designsare original, and have repeatedly been worked with great care, toprove their correctness; the illustrations have equally shared mysupervision; and I humbly hope and trust that it may be as successful,and give as much satisfaction to my friends and the public, as myCrochet Book, for which I am amply rewarded by itsunprecedented success, and grateful for the many flatteringtestimonials received. I must here also make some observations uponthe many cheap publications that have recently appeared (two of whichhave copied verbatim my illustrated instructions, even to afault in the drawing), and to direct the attention of those of myreaders competent to understand the many plagiarisms and generalunfitness as works of instruction, of the majority, if not the wholeof those publications. I should hope, and it is needless to say, thatthese remarks proceed not from the impulse of a spirit of rivalry, butfrom a sincere conviction that the details and instructions thereinconveyed are calculated seriously to mislead, if not entirely preventand disgust the student from acquiring a proper knowledge of theseelegant and usefuliiemployments, by their incorrectness; that, in short, they are nothingmore than very imperfect arrangements, copied from the really usefulWorks that have been hitherto published, and tend quite as much toinjure those Who publish from experience, as those who learn in orderto derive instruction or add information to their previous knowledge.

E. R. B.

Ladies who may require instruction, can obtain cards of address at the Publisher’s, orMessrs. Barry and Sons, Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly.

These designs are registered, but any person desirous of working the patterns forthe purposes of sale, can have permission upon application.


iii

CONTENTS.


TERMS.

  PAGE
To cast on with one Pin 1
To cast on with two Pins 2
Plain Knitting 3
To make a Stitch 3
To make two, three, or more Stitches 4
To slip a Stitch 4
To knit two Stitches together 5
To knit three Stitches together 5
Pearl, also called Seam-back, and Rib Knitting 5
Pearl, and Plain Stitches in the same Row 5
To Pearl two or three Stitches together 6
To make a Stitch in Pearl Knitting 6
To form a Round 6
To raise Stitches 7
A Row 7
A Pattern 7
To join two Pieces of Knitting together 8
ivA Parenthesis ( ) 8
A Mark * 8
To cast off 9
Stitches over 9

PATTERNS.

Berthe. Chantilly Pattern 10
Lace Edging for Berthe 15
Manchette, Point Lace Pattern 18
Double Collar, Malines Lace 23
Anti-Macassar Pattern 26
—— Maltese Pattern 28
Centre for Shawl, Venetian Pattern 32
Round Border for ditto 35
Fringe for ditto 38
Canezou 39
Chemisette, Genoese 40
Cap (Baby’s) 44
Crown for ditto 45
Couvre Pied, or Curtain 47
Collar 50
Lace Edging 52
—— DITTO 54

1INSTRUCTION IN KNITTING,
AND
EXPLANATION OF TERMS.

TO CAST ON WITH ONE PIN.

Take the thread, and putting itbetween the second and third fingersof the left hand, leave anend of about one yard for every100 stitches; pass it round theleft thumb, from left to right;then take the pin in the righthand, placing it under the crossingof the thread; put the needledown the loop, and bring thethread from the outside forwardon the point of the pin; take thethread in the right hand, andpassing it round the pin as A,turn the loop B on the left thumbover the pin, and draw it tightwith the end thread in the left hand, and repeat until the required number of stitches areon the pin.

2

TO CAST ON WITH TWO PINS.

This is the Spanish method, andis particularly adapted for workingfine wools, by its forming alooser stitch. Tie a loop at theend of the thread, and put it onthe pin, holding it in the lefthand; take the other pin withthe right hand, and put it inthe loop; pass the thread betweenthe pins, and bring itforward then with the right handpin; bring the thread throughthe loop on the left pin; therewill now be a loop on each pinas C and D; then pass the loopD on to the left pin; repeat byputting the right hand pin through the loop D, and passing the thread between the pinsas before.

3

PLAIN KNITTING.

After casting on the stitches, holdthe pin with the stitches on itin the left hand, and with thethread turned round the littlefinger of the right hand pass itunder the second and third fingers,and over the forefinger;take the other pin in the righthand; put this pin into the firstloop on the left pin, and withthe forefinger of the right handpass the thread between the pins,bring the thread through, whichforms one stitch; then take theloop off the left pin and repeat.

TO MAKE A STITCH

Bring the thread forward between the pins; when this stitch is worked in the next row it will form an open stitch.
4

TO MAKE TWO, THREE, OR MORE STITCHES.

Turn the thread as many timesround the pin as E, F, G, andin the next row; pearl a stitchand knit a stitch, alternately,taking off one turn of the threadeach time, for as many stitchesas were made in the row before.

TO SLIP A STITCH.

To pass a stitch from the left pin to the right without working it. In all knitting the firststitch of every row should be slipped to make a firm and even selvedge; this is notmentioned in the receipts, as it would much lengthen the description, but is to be observedas a fixed rule; for example, when a row commences thus; knit 2 together, work asfollows:—slip the 1st stitch, knit the 2d, and turn the slipped stitch over the knitted one.

5

TO KNIT TWO STITCHES TOGETHER.

Take two stitches with the right hand pin, and knit as 1 stitch.

TO KNIT THREE STITCHES TOGETHER.

Slip 1 stitch, knit 2 stitches together, and with the point of the left hand pin turn theslipped stitch over the 2 knitted together, leaving but 1 stitch.

PEARL, ALSO CALLED SEAM, BACK, AND RIB KNITTING.

Commence the row with thethread in front of the pin, passthe point of the pin down thestitch, turn the thread roundthe pin, and take it off as inplain knitting; repeat, alwayskeeping the thread in front.

PEARL

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