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A plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights entertainments, now entituled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night Volume 10 (of 17)

A plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights entertainments, now entituled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night Volume 10 (of 17)
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Title: A plain and literal translation of the Arabian nights entertainments, now entituled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night Volume 10 (of 17)
Release Date: 2018-11-26
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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Transcriber's Note:

The cover image was created by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.


‏‏لا لابرار كلّ شي تبر‎‎
“TO THE PURE ALL THINGS ARE PURE.”
(Puris omnia pura)
Arab Proverb.
Niuna corrotta mente intese mai sanamente parole.
—“Decameron”—conclusion.
Erubuit, posuitque meum Lucretia librum
Sed coram Bruto. Brute! recede, leget.
Martial.
Mieulx est de ris que de larmes escripre,
Pour ce que rire est le propre des hommes.
Rabelais.

“The pleasure we derive from perusing the Thousand-and-OneStories makes us regret that we possess only a comparatively smallpart of these truly enchanting fictions.”

Crichton’sHistory of Arabia.”


A PLAIN AND LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS. NOW ENTITULED

THE BOOK OF THE
Thousand Nights and a Night
 
WITH INTRODUCTION EXPLANATORY NOTES ON THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF MOSLEM MEN AND A TERMINAL ESSAY UPON THE HISTORY OF THE NIGHTS
 
VOLUME X.

BY
RICHARD F. BURTON
PRINTED BY THE BURTON CLUB FOR PRIVATE SUBSCRIBERS ONLY

Shammar Edition

Limited to one thousand numbered sets,of which this is

Number 547
Printed in U. S. A.
TO
HIS EXCELLENCY YACOUB ARTIN PASHA,
MINISTER OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. ETC. ETC. CAIRO.
My Dear Pasha,

During the last dozen years, since we first met at Cairo, youhave done much for Egyptian folk-lore and you can do much more. Thisvolume is inscribed to you with a double purpose; first it is intended as apublic expression of gratitude for your friendly assistance; and, secondly,as a memento that the samples which you have given us imply a promiseof further gift. With this lively sense of favours to come I subscribemyself

Ever your friend and fellow worker,
RICHARD F. BURTON.
London, July 12, 1886.

CONTENTS OF THE TENTH VOLUME.

    PAGE
 
MA’ARUF THE COBBLER AND HIS WIFE FATIMAH 1
 
(Lane, The Story of Ma’aruf, III. 671–732.)
 
CONCLUSION 54
 
TERMINAL ESSAY 63
 
INDEX OF THE TENTH VOLUME 303
 
APPENDIX I.—  
 
  I. Index to the Tales and Proper Names 309
 
  II. Alphabetical Table of the Notes (Anthropological, &c.) 322
 
  III. Alphabetical Table of First Lines  
    A. English 393
    B. Arabic 421
 
  IV. Table of Contents of the various Arabic Texts  
    A. The Unfinished Calcutta Edition (1814–1818) 448
    B. The Breslau Text 450
    C. The Macnaghten Text and the Bulak Edition 457
    D. The same with Mr. Lane’s and my Version 464
 
APPENDIX II.—  
 
  Contributions to the Bibliography of the Thousand and One Nights and their Imitations, by W. F. Kirby 465
1

MA’ARUF THE COBBLER AND HIS WIFE FATIMAH.

There dwelt once upon a time in the God-guarded city of Cairoa cobbler who lived by patching old shoes.[1] His name wasMa’aruf[2] and he had a wife called Fatimah, whom the folk hadnicknamed “The Dung;”[3] for that she was a whorish, worthlesswretch, scanty of shame and mickle of mischief. She ruled herspouse and used to abuse him and curse him a thousand times aday; and he feared her malice and dreaded her misdoings; forthat he was a sensible man and careful of his repute, but poor-conditioned.When he earned much, he spent it on her, andwhen he gained little, she revenged herself on his body that night,leaving him no peace and making his night black as her book;[4]for she was even as of one like her saith the poet:—

How manifold nights have I passed with my wife ✿ In the saddest plight with all misery rife:
Would Heaven when first I went in to her ✿ With a cup of cold poison I’d ta’en her life.

Amongst other afflictions which befel him from her one day shesaid to him, “O Ma’aruf, I wish thee to bring me this night avermicelli-cake dressed with bees’ honey.”[5] He replied, “So Allah2Almighty aid me to its price, I will bring it thee. By Allah, Ihave no dirhams to-day, but our Lord will make things easy.”[6]Rejoined she,——And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day andceased to say her permitted say.

Now when it was the Nine Hundred and Ninetieth Night,

She resumed, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, thatMa’aruf the Cobbler said to his spouse, “If Allah aid me to itsprice, I will bring it to thee this night. By Allah, I have nodirhams to-day, but our Lord will make things easy to me!” Sherejoined, “I wot naught of these words; whether He aid thee oraid thee not, look thou come not to me save with the vermicelliand bees’ honey; and if thou come without it I will make thynight black as thy fortune whenas thou marriedst me and fellestinto my hand.” Quoth he, “Allah is bountiful!” and going outwith grief scattering itself from his body, prayed the dawn-prayerand opened his shop, saying, “I beseech thee, O Lord, to vouchsafeme the price of the Kunafah and ward off from me the mischief ofyonder wicked woman this night!” After which he sat in theshop till noon, but no work came to him and his fear of his wiferedoubled. Then he arose and locking his shop, went out perplexedas to how he should do in the matter of the vermicelli-cake,seeing he had not even the wherewithal to buy bread. Presentlyhe came up to the shop of the Kunafah-seller and stood before itdistraught, whilst his eyes brimmed with tears. The pastry-cookglanced at him and said, “O Master Ma’aruf, why dost thou weep?Tell me what hath befallen thee.” So he acquainted him with hiscase, saying, “My wife is a shrew, a virago who would have mebring her a Kunafah; but I have sat in my shop till pastmid-day and have not gained even the price of bread; whereforeI am in fear of her.” The cook laughed and said, “No harm shallcome to thee. How many pounds wilt thou have?” “Fivepounds,” answered Ma’aruf. So the man weighed him out fivepounds of vermicelli-cake and said to him, “I have clarified butter,but no bees’ honey. Here is drip-honey,[7] however, which is better3than bees’ honey; and what harm will there be, if it be with drip-honey?”Ma’aruf was ashamed to object, because the pastry-cookwas to have patience with him for the price, and said, “Giveit me with drip-honey.” So he fried a vermicelli-cake for him withbutter and drenched it with drip-honey, till it was fit to present toKings. Then he asked him, “Dost thou want bread[8] andcheese?”; and Ma’aruf answered, “Yes.” So he gave him fourhalf dirhams worth of bread and one of cheese, and the vermicelliwas ten nusfs. Then said he, “Know, O Ma’aruf, that thou owestme fifteen nusfs; so go to thy wife and make merry and take thisnusf for the Hammam;[9] and thou shalt have credit for a day ortwo or three till Allah provide thee with thy daily bread. Andstraiten not thy wife, for I will have patience with thee till suchtime as thou shalt have dirhams to spare.” So Ma’aruf took thevermicelli-cake and bread and cheese and went away, with aheart at ease, blessing the pastry-cook and saying, “Extolled beThy perfection, O my Lord! How bountiful art Thou!” Whenhe came home, his wife enquired of him, “Hast thou brought thevermicelli-cake?”; and, replying “Yes,” he set it before her.She looked at it and seeing that it was dressed with cane-honey,[10]said to him, “Did I not bid thee bring it with bees’ honey? Wiltthou contrary my wish and have it dressed

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