» » Cicero Letters to Atticus, v. I

Cicero Letters to Atticus, v. I

Cicero Letters to Atticus, v. I
Category:
Title: Cicero Letters to Atticus, v. I
Release Date: 2018-12-06
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 88
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 63

Transcriber’s Note:

The cover image was created by the transcriber and is placed in the public domain.

THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY
EDITED BY
T. E. PAGE, M.A., AND W. H. D. ROUSE, Litt.D.
LETTERS TO ATTICUS
I

CICERO.
BUST IN THE CAPITOLINE MUSEUM, ROME.

CICERO
LETTERS TO ATTICUS

WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY
E. O. WINSTEDT, M.A.
OF MAGDALEN COLLEGE, OXFORD
IN THREE VOLUMES
I
WH
LONDON: WILLIAM HEINEMANN
NEW YORK: G. P. PUTNAM’S SONS
MCMXIX.
First printed 1912.
Reprinted 1919.

v

INTRODUCTION

The letters contained in this volume cover a largeand important period in Cicero’s life and in thehistory of Rome. They begin when he was 38 yearsof age; and at first they are not very numerous. Thereare only two of that year (68 B.C.), six of the followingyear, one of the year 66, when he held the praetorship,and two of 65. Then there is a gap in his correspondence.No letters at all survive from the periodof his consulship and the Catilinarian conspiracy;and the letters to Atticus do not begin again untiltwo years after that event. Thereafter they aresufficiently frequent to justify Cornelius Nepos’ criticism,that reading them, one has little need of anelaborate history of the period. There are full—almosttoo full—details, considering the frequentcomplaints and repetitions, during the year of hisbanishment (58–57 B.C.), and the correspondencecontinues unbroken to the year 54. Then after alapse of two years or more, which Atticus presumablyspent in Rome, it begins again in 51, whenCicero was sent to Cilicia as pro-consul, much againsthis will; and the volume ends with a hint of thetrouble that was brewing between Caesar andPompey, as Cicero was returning to Rome towardsthe end of the next year.

The letters have been translated in the traditionaryorder in which they are usually printed. That order,however, is not strictly chronological; and, for theconvenience of those who would read them in theirhistorical order, a table arranging them so far aspossible in order of date has been drawn up at theend of the volume.

For the basis of the text the Teubner edition hasvibeen used; but it has been revised by comparison withmore recent works and papers on the subject. Textualnotes have only been given in a few cases where thereading is especially corrupt or uncertain; and othernotes too have been confined to cases where they seemedabsolutely indispensable. For such notes and in thetranslation itself, I must acknowledge my indebtednessto predecessors, especially to Tyrrell’s indispensableedition and Shuckburgh’s excellent translation.

There remain two small points to which I mayperhaps call attention here in case they should puzzlethe general reader. The first is that, when hefinds the dates in this volume disagreeing with therules and tables generally given in Latin grammarsand taught in schools, he must please to rememberthat those rules apply only to the Julian Calendar,which was introduced in 45 B.C., and that theseletters were written before that date. Before thealterations introduced by Caesar, March, May, Julyand October had 31 days each, February 28, and theother months 29. Compared with the Julian Calendarthis shows a difference of two days in all dates which fallbetween the Ides and the end of the months January,August and December, and of one day in similardates in April, June, September and November.

The second point, which requires explanation, isthe presence of some numerals in the margin of thetext of letters 16 to 19 of Book IV. As Mommsenpointed out, the archetype from which the existentMSS. were copied must have had some of the leavescontaining these letters transposed. These werecopied in our MSS. in the wrong order, and were soprinted in earlier editions. In the text Mommsen’sorder, with some recent modifications introduced byviiHolzapfel, has been adopted; and the figures in themargin denote the place of the transposed passages inthe older editions, the Roman figures denoting the letterfrom which each particular passage has been shiftedand the Arabic numerals the section of that letter.

The following signs have been used in the apparatuscriticus:—

M = the Codex Mediceus 49, 18, written in the year1389 A.D., and now preserved in the LaurentianLibrary at Florence. M1 denotes the reading ofthe first hand, and M2 that of a reviser.

Δ = the reading of M when supported by that of theCodex Urbinas 322, a MS. of the 15th century,preserved in the Vatican Library.

E = Codex Ambrosianus E, 14, a MS. probably of the14th century, in the Ambrosian Library at Milan.

N = the Codex ex abbatia Florentina n. 49 in theLaurentian Library, written in the 14th or 15thcentury.

P = No. 8536 of the Latin MSS. in the BibliothèqueNationale at Paris, a MS. of the 15th century.

R = No. 8538 of the same collection, written in theyear 1419. These four MSS. E, N, P, R, withsome others form a separate class; and

Σ = the reading of all the MSS. of this class, or of apreponderant number of them.

C = the marginal readings in Cratander’s edition of1528, drawn from a MS. which is now lost.

Z = the readings of the lost Codex Tornaesianus, Zbdenoting the reading as preserved by Bosius, andZl that testified to by Lambinus.

I = the reading of the editio Jensoniana published atVenice in 1470.

Rom. = the edition published at Rome in 1470.

ix

CONTENTS

Letters to Atticus Book I Page 3
   
Letters to Atticus Book II 101
   
Letters to Atticus Book III 197
   
Letters to Atticus Book IV 259
   
Letters to Atticus Book V 337
   
Letters to Atticus Book VI 415
xi
CICERO’S LETTERS
TO ATTICUS
BOOK I
2

M. TULLI CICERONIS
EPISTULARUM AD ATTICUM
LIBER PRIMUS

I
 
CICERO ATTICO SAL.

Scr. Romae m. Quint. a. 689

Petitionis nostrae, quam tibi summae curae essescio, huius modi ratio est, quod adhuc coniectura provideripossit. Prensat unus P. Galba. Sine fuco acfallaciis more maiorum negatur. Ut opinio est hominum,non aliena rationi nostrae fuit illius haecpraepropera prensatio. Nam illi ita negant vulgo, utmihi se debere dicant. Ita quiddam spero nobis profici,cum hoc percrebrescit, plurimos nostros amicosinveniri. Nos autem initium prensandi facere cogitaramuseo ipso tempore, quo tuum puerum cum hislitteris proficisci Cincius dicebat, in campo comitiistribuniciis a. d. XVI Kalend. Sextiles. Competitores,qui certi esse videantur, Galba et Antonius et Q.Cornificius. Puto te in hoc aut risisse aut ingemuisse.Ut frontem ferias, sunt, qui etiam Caesonium putent.Aquilium non arbitrabamur, qui denegavit et iuravitmorbum et illud suum regnum iudiciale opposuit.Catilina, si iudicatum erit meridie non lucere, certuserit competitor. De Aufidio et Palicano non putote exspectare dum scribam. De iis, qui nunc petunt,Caesar certus putatur. Thermus cum Silano contendere

3

CICERO’S LETTERS
TO ATTICUS
BOOK I

I
 
CICERO TO ATTICUS, GREETING.

Rome, July, B.C. 65

With regard to my candidature, in which I knowyou take the greatest interest, things stand as follows,so far as one can guess at present. P. Galbais the only canvasser who is hard at work; and hemeets with a plain and simple, old-fashioned, No.As people think, this unseemly haste of his in canvassingis by no means a bad thing for my interests:for most refusals imply a pledge of support to me.So I have hope that I may derive some advantagefrom it, when the news gets abroad that mysupporters are in the majority. I had thought ofbeginning to canvass in the Campus Martius at theelection of tribunes on the 17th of July, the verytime that, Cincius tells me, your man will be startingwith this letter. It seems certain that Galba, Antonius,and Q. Cornificius will be standing with me.I can imagine your smile or sigh at the news. Tomake you tear your hair, there are some who thinkCaesonius will be a candidate too. I don’t supposeAquilius will. He has said not, pleading his illnessand his supremacy in the law courts in excuse.Catiline will be sure to be standing, if the verdict is,No sun at midday. Of course you will know all aboutAufidius and Palicanus, without waiting for lettersfrom me. Of those who are standing, Caesar isthought to be a certainty: the real fight is expected

4

existimatur; qui sic inopes et ab amicis et existimationesunt, ut mihi videatur non esse ἀδύνατονCurium obducere. Sed hoc praeter me nemini videtur.Nostris rationibus maxime conducere videtur Thermumfieri cum Caesare. Nemo est enim ex iis, quinunc petunt, qui, si in nostrum annum reciderit,firmior candidatus fore videatur, propterea quodcurator est viae Flaminiae, quae tum erit absolutasane facile. Eum libenter nunc Caesari consuli accuderim.[1]Petitorum haec est adhuc informata cogitatio.Nos in omni munere candidatorio fungendosummam adhibebimus diligentiam, et fortasse, quoniamvidetur in suffragiis multum posse Gallia, cumRomae a iudiciis forum refrixerit, excurremus menseSeptembri legati ad Pisonem, ut Ianuario revertamur.Cum perspexero voluntates nobilium, scribam ad te.Cetera spero prolixa esse his dumtaxat urbanis competitoribus.Illam manum tu mihi cura ut praestes,quoniam propius abes, Pompei, nostri amici. Negame ei iratum fore, si ad mea comitia non venerit.Atque haec huius modi sunt.

Sed est, quod abs te mihi ignosci pervelim. Caecilius,avunculus tuus, a P. Vario cum magna pecuniafraudaretur, agere coepit cum eius fratre A. CaninioSatyro de iis rebus, quas eum dolo malo mancipioaccepisse de Vario diceret. Una agebant ceteri creditores,in quibus erat L. Lucullus et P. Scipio et, isquem putabant magistrum fore, si bona venirent, L.

1. que cum (tum Z) erit—libenter nunc ceteri (nuntitereM marg.: nunciteri Z) consuli (concili Z), acciderim (accideruntZ) M Zl: the reading in the text is that of Boot.

5to lie between Thermus and Silanus. But they areso unpopular and so unknown, that it seems to me tobe on the cards to smuggle in Curius. Nobody elsethinks so, however. It would probably suit ourbook best for Thermus to get in with Caesar: for, ofthe present batch of candidates, he would be themost formidable rival if he were put off to my year,as he is commissioner for the repairing of the Flaminianroad. That will easily be finished by then:so I should like to lump him together with Caesarnow. Such is the present rough guess of thechances of the candidates. I shall take the greatestcare to fulfil all a candidate’s duties: and, as Gaul’svote counts high, I shall probably get a free passand take a run up to visit Piso, as soon

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 63
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net