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The Appreciation of Music - Vol. I (of 3)

The Appreciation of Music - Vol. I (of 3)
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Title: The Appreciation of Music - Vol. I (of 3)
Release Date: 2018-12-12
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Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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THE APPRECIATION OF MUSIC

VOL. I.

THE APPRECIATION OF MUSIC CLOTH $1.50

By Thomas Whitney Surette and Daniel Gregory Mason

SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUME OF MUSICAL ILLUSTRATIONS $1.00

VOL. II.

GREAT MODERN COMPOSERS CLOTH $1.50

By Daniel Gregory Mason

VOL. III.

SHORT STUDIES IN GREAT MASTERPIECES

By Daniel Gregory Mason

OTHER WORKS

BY

DANIEL GREGORY MASON

A GUIDE TO MUSIC. A BOOK FOR BEGINNERS CLOTH $1.25

ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS AND WHAT THEY DO,
WITH TWENTY-SEVEN ILLUSTRATIONS AND
ORCHESTRAL CHART CLOTH $1.25

THE APPRECIATION OF MUSIC

VOLUME I

BY

THOMAS WHITNEY SURETTE
AND
DANIEL GREGORY MASON

NINTH EDITION

Supplementary Volume of Musical Illustrations
Price $1.00

NEW YORK
THE H. W. GRAY CO.
SOLE AGENTS FOR
NOVELLO & CO., LTD.

COPYRIGHT, 1907, BY
THE H. W. GRAY COMPANY


The Knickerbocker Press, New York

PREFATORY NOTE.

This book has been prepared in order to provide readerswho wish to listen to music intelligently, yet without goinginto technicalities, with a simple and practical guide tomusical appreciation written from the listener's ratherthan from the professional musician's standpoint.

The authors believe that there is at the present momenta genuine need for such a book. Teachers in schools,colleges, and universities, educators in all parts of thecountry, and the music-loving public generally, are everyday realizing more vividly the importance of applying tomusic the kind of study which has long been fruitfullypursued in the other arts; and with the adoption, in 1906,by the College Entrance Examination Board, of musicalappreciation as a subject which may be offered for entranceto college, this mode of studying music has establisheditself firmly in our educational system. Yet its progressis still hampered by the lack of suitable text-books. Theexisting books are for the most part either too technicalto be easily followed by the general reader, or so rhapsodicaland impressionistic as to be of no use to him.

In the following pages an effort has been made, first,to present to the reader in clear and untechnical language[iv]an account of the evolution of musical art from the primitivefolk-song up to the symphony of Beethoven; second,to illustrate all the steps of this evolution by carefullychosen musical examples, in the form of short quotationsin the text and of complete pieces printed in a supplement;third, to facilitate the study of these examples by meansof detailed analysis, measure by measure, in many casesput into the shape of tabular views; and fourth, to markout the lines of further study by suggesting collateral reading.

Too much stress cannot be laid on the fact that themusic itself is the central point of the scheme of study, towhich the reader must return over and over again. Carefullyattentive, concentrated listening to the typical piecespresented in the supplement is the essence of the work, towhich the reading of the text is to be considered merelyas an aid. These pieces are for the most part not beyondthe reach of a pianist of moderate ability.

At the same time, the authors have realized that somereaders who might profit much by such study will not beable to play, or have played for them, even these pieces.For them, however, the music will still be accessible throughmechanical instruments.

In view of the fact that one of the chief difficulties inthe study of musical appreciation is the unfamiliarity ofclassical music to the ordinary student, the use of an instrumentby the students themselves should form an importantpart of the work in classes where this book is used as a[v]text-book. It is hoped that with such practical laboratorywork by all members of the class, and with the help ofcollateral reading done outside the class under the directionof the teacher, and tested by written papers on assignedtopics, the course of study outlined here will be found well-suitedto the needs of schools and colleges, as well as ofgeneral readers.

CONTENTS.

 CHAPTER I.  
  PAGE
 ELEMENTS OF MUSICAL FORM.1
I. INTRODUCTORY1
II. WHAT TO NOTICE FIRST3
III. MUSICAL MOTIVES4
IV.WHAT THE COMPOSER DOES WITH HIS MOTIVES6
V.THE FIRST STEPS AS REVEALED BY HISTORY10
VI. A SPANISH FOLK-SONG12
VII. BALANCE OF PHRASES13
VIII. SUMMARY14
 CHAPTER II.  
 FOLK-SONGS.16
I. FOLK-SONGS AND ART SONGS17
II. AN ENGLISH FOLK-SONG20
III. KEY AND MODULATION21
IV. BARBARA ALLEN22
V. NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS IN FOLK-SONGS25
VI. AN IRISH FOLK-SONG26
VII. A GERMAN FOLK-SONG28
VIII. SUMMARY30
 CHAPTER III.  
  THE POLYPHONIC MUSIC OF BACH.31
I. WHAT IS POLYPHONY32
II. AN INVENTION BY BACH33
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 1. 
 Bach: Two-voice, Invention. No, VIII, in F-major34
III. A FUGUE BY BACH37
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 2.  
 
 
Bach: Fugue No. 2, in C-minor, in three voices.
"Well-tempered Clavichord," Book I
 
38
IV. GENERAL QUALITIES OF BACH'S WORK43
 CHAPTER IV.  
  THE DANCE AND ITS DEVELOPMENT.48
I. MUSICAL CHARACTER OF DANCES48
II. PRIMITIVE DANCES52
 EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 3.  
 Corelli: Gavotte in F-major56
III. A BACH GAVOTTE57
 EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 4.  
 Bach: Gavotte in D-minor, from the Sixth English Suite57
 CHAPTER V.  
 THE SUITE.62
I. DERIVATION OF THE SUITE62
II. THE SUITES OF BACH65
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 5.  
  Bach: Prelude to English Suite, No. 3, in G-minor65
 EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 6.  
 Bach: Sarabande in A-minor, from English Suite, No. 268
 EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 7. 
  Bach: Gigue, from French Suite, No. 4, in E-flat71
III. THE HISTORIC IMPORTANCE OF THE SUITE72
 CHAPTER VI.  
 THE RONDO.74
I. DERIVATION OF THE RONDO75
II. A RONDO BY COUPERIN79
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 8.  
  Couperin: "Les Moissonneurs" ("The Harvesters")80
III. FROM COUPERIN TO MOZART83
IV. A RONDO BY MOZART86
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 9.  
  Mozart: Rondo from Piano Sonata in B-flat major87
 CHAPTER VII.  
  THE VARIATION FORM—THE MINUET.93
I. VARIATIONS BY JOHN BULL94
II. A GAVOTTE AND VARIATIONS BY RAMEAU97
III. HANDEL'S "HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH"100
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 10.  
  Handel: "The Harmonious Blacksmith," from the Fifth Suite for Clavichord101
IV. HAYDN'S ANDANTE WITH VARIATIONS, IN F-MINOR103
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 11. 
  Haydn: Andante with Variations, in F-minor104
V. THE MINUET108
 CHAPTER VIII.  
  SONATA-FORM, I.110
I. COMPOSITE NATURE OF THE SONATA110
II. ESSENTIALS OF SONATA-FORM111
III. A SONATA BY PHILIP EMANUEL BACH114
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 12.  
  Philip Emanuel Bach: Piano Sonata in F-minor, first movement115
IV. HARMONY AS A PART OF DESIGN125
V. SUMMARY126
 CHAPTER IX.  
 SONATA-FORM, II.128
I. HAYDN AND THE SONATA-FORM128
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 13.  
  Haydn: "Surprise Symphony," first movement131
II. MOZART AND THE SONATA-FORM134
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 14.  
  Mozart: Symphony in G-minor, first movement136
III. MOZART'S ARTISTIC SKILL138
 CHAPTER X.  
  THE SLOW MOVEMENT.143
I. VARIETIES OF FORM143
II. SLOW MOVEMENTS OF PIANO SONATAS145
III. THE STRING QUARTET148
 EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 15.  
 
 
Haydn: Adagio in E-flat major, from the
String Quartet in G-major, op. 77, No. 1
 
149
IV.GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS151
V. FORM OF HAYDN'S ADAGIO152
VI. MOZART AND THE CLASSIC STYLE153
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 16.  
  Mozart: Andante from String Quartet in C-major156
VII. FORM OF MOZART'S ANDANTE159
 CHAPTER XI.  
 BEETHOVEN—I.161
I. GENERAL CHARACTER OF BEETHOVEN'S WORK161
II. ANALYSIS OF A BEETHOVEN SONATA166
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 17.  
  Beethoven: Pathtique Sonata, first movement166
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 18. 
 Beethoven: Pathtique Sonata, second movement170
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 19.  
  Beethoven: Pathtique Sonata, third movement171
III. SUMMARY174
 CHAPTER XII.  
 BEETHOVEN—II.176
I. FORM AND CONTENT176
II. BEETHOVEN'S STYLE178
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 20.  
 Beethoven: The Fifth Symphony, first movement181
III. THE DRAMATIC ELEMENT IN BEETHOVEN'S MUSIC185
IV. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FIRST MOVEMENT OF THE FIFTH SYMPHONY187
 CHAPTER XIII. 
 BEETHOVEN—III.191
 I. THE SLOW MOVEMENT BEFORE BEETHOVEN191
II. THE SLOW MOVEMENTS OF BEETHOVEN'S EARLY SYMPHONIES192
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 21. 
  Beethoven: The Fifth Symphony. Slow movement195
III. INDIVIDUALITY OF THE ANDANTE OF THE FIFTH SYMPHONY198
IV. THE HARMONIC PLAN201
V. THE UNIVERSALITY OF BEETHOVEN'S GENIUS203
 CHAPTER XIV. 
  BEETHOVEN—IV.205
I. BEETHOVEN'S HUMOR205
II. SCHERZOS FROM BEETHOVEN'S SONATAS209
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 22. 
  Beethoven: Scherzo from the Twelfth Sonata209
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 23. 
  Beethoven: Scherzo from the Fifteenth Sonata210
III. THE SCHERZOS OF BEETHOVEN'S SYMPHONIES211
  EXAMPLE FOR ANALYSIS, No. 24. 
  Beethoven: Scherzo from the Fifth Symphony218
IV. GENERAL SUMMARY221

THE APPRECIATION OF MUSIC

CHAPTER I.
ELEMENTS OF MUSICAL FORM.

I. INTRODUCTORY.

Of the thousands of people who consider themselveslovers of music, it is surprising how few have any real appreciationof it. It is safe to say that

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