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The Naturalist's Library, Vol XXXI. Foreign Butterflies

The Naturalist's Library, Vol XXXI. Foreign Butterflies
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Title: The Naturalist's Library, Vol XXXI. Foreign Butterflies
Release Date: 2018-12-30
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Date added: 27 March 2019
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Lizars. sc.

LAMARCK

Engraved for the Naturalist’s Library

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THE
NATURALIST’S LIBRARY.
————
ENTOMOLOGY.
————

LONDON. HENRY G. BOHN.
YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

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THE
NATURALIST’S LIBRARY.
EDITED BY
SIR WILLIAM JARDINE, BART.
F.R.S.E., F.L.S., ETC., ETC.

VOL. XXXI.
ENTOMOLOGY.
FOREIGN BUTTERFLIES.
BY JAMES DUNCAN,
M.W.S., ETC.

EDINBURGH:
W. H. LIZARS, 3, ST. JAMES’ SQUARE.
LONDON:
HENRY G. BOHN, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
1858.

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CONTENTS.

PAGE
Memoir of Lamarck 17
Introduction 65
Genus Ornithoptera 87
Ornithoptera Priamus. Plate I. Fig. 1. 89
Ornithoptera Remus. Plate I. Fig. 2. 92
Genus Papilio 93
Papilio Memnon. Plate II. Fig. 1. 97
Papilio Æneas. Plate II. Fig. 2. 99
Papilio Ascanius. Plate III. Fig. 1. 101
Papilio Paris. Plate III. Fig. 2. 102
Papilio Protesilaus. Plate IV. Fig. 1. 104
Papilio Sinon. Plate IV. Fig. 2. 106
Leptocircus Curius. Plate V. Fig. 1. 107
Thais Medesicaste. Plate V. Fig. 2. 108
Genus Pieris 110
Pieris Epicharis. Plate VI. Figs. 1 and 2. 112
Pieris Philyra. Plate VI. Fig. 3. 113
Pieris Belisama. Plate VII. Fig. 1. 114
Genus Anthocharis 115
Anthocharis Danæ. Plate VII. Fig. 2. 11612
Genus Iphias 118
Iphias Leucippe. Plate VII. Fig. 3. 119
Genus Callidryas 120
Callidryas Eubule. Plate VIII. Fig. 1. 122
Genus Terias 124
Terias Mexicana. Plate VIII. Fig. 4. 125
Genus Euplœa 126
Euplœa Limniace. Plate IX. Fig. 1. 127
Euplœa Plexippe. Plate IX. Fig. 2. 128
Genus Idea 130
Idea Agelia. Plate X. Fig. 1. 131
Idea Daos. Plate X. Fig. 2. 132
Genus Heliconia 133
Heliconia Erato. Plate XI. Fig. 1. 135
Heliconia Cynisca. Plate XI. Fig. 2. 137
Heliconia Sylvana. Plate XI. Fig. 3. 138
Heliconia Flora. Plate XII. Figs. 1 and 2. 139
Heliconia Diaphana. Plate XII. Fig. 3. 141
Genus Acræa 142
Acræa Pasiphæ. Plate XII. Fig. 4. 143
Genus Cethosia 144
Cethosia Dido. Plate XIII. 145
Cethosia Cyane. Plate XIV. 147
Genus Vanessa 149
Vanessa Juliana. Plate XV. Fig. 1. 150
Vanessa Amathea. Plate XV. Fig. 2. 151
Vanessa Orithya. Plate XV. Fig. 3. 152
Charaxes Jasius. Plate XVI. 154
Nymphalis Etheocles. Plate XVII. Fig. 1. 157
Nymphalis Tiridates. Plate XVII. Figs. 2 and 3. 159
Peridromia Arethusa. Plate XVIII. Fig. 1. 160
Peridromia Amphinome. Plate XVIII. Fig. 2. 162
Marius Thetis. Plate XIX. Fig. 1. 16413
Fabius Hippona. Plate XIX. Fig. 2. 167
Catagramma Condomanus. Plate XX. Figs. 1 and 2. 169
Catagramma Pyramus. Plate XX. Figs. 3 and 4. 171
Genus Morpho 172
Morpho Helenor. Plate XXI. 174
Morpho Adonis. Plate XXII. Fig. 1. 176
Genus Pavonia 178
Pavonia Teucer. Plate XXII. Fig. 2. 179
Arpidea Chorinæa. Plate XXIII. 180
Helicopis Gnidus. Plate XXIV. Figs. 1 and 2. 183
Erycina Octavius. Plate XXIV. Fig. 3. 185
Erycina Melibæus. Plate XXV. Figs. 1 and 2. 187
Loxura Alcides. Plate XXV. Fig. 3. 188
Polyommatus Marsyas. Plate XXVI. Figs. 1 and 2. 190
Polyommatus Endymion. Plate XXVI. Figs. 3 and 4. 192
Polyommatus Venus. Plate XXVII. Figs. 1 and 2. 193
Polyommatus Achæus. Plate XXVII. Figs 3 and 4. 194
Genus Thaliura 195
Thaliura Rhipheus. Plate XXVIII. 197
Genus Urania 200
Urania Sloanus. Plate XXIX. Fig. 1. 202
Urania Leilus. Plate XXIX. Fig. 2. 203
Rhipheus Dasycephalus. Plate XXX. 205
Portrait of Lamarck 2
Vignette, Title Page 3

In all, Thirty-two Plates in this Volume. With one Platedouble, making the number equal to
THIRTY-THREE.

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MEMOIR OF LAMARCK.


MEMOIR OF LAMARCK.

Among the many eminent French naturalists, whoseloss to science we have so often had occasion tolament during the few past years, the above individualoccupied a conspicuous place. He was longknown in Paris by his public prelections, and hisnumerous writings have procured for him a highdegree of reputation throughout Europe. In thiscountry he is best known by his admirable works oninvertebrate animals, which may be said to haveformed a new era in the history of that extensivedepartment of the animal kingdom. But his studieshad a very extensive range; many of the mostinteresting inquiries which for ages have fixed theattention of mankind, were the subjects of hismeditation, and on most of them he formed anumber of definite ideas which he promulgatedunder the form of theories. Although these speculationsare of a highly fanciful description, and someof them greatly to be deprecated on account of theirhurtful tendency, yet they merit attention as theproductions of a mind remarkable for originality18and penetration, as well as for extensive and variedknowledge.


Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet,generally called the Chevalier de Lamarck, wasdescended from an ancient family of some distinction,possessed of considerable property in theprovince of Bearn. He was born at Bezantin, asmall village in Picardy, on the 1st August, 1744.His fathers pecuniary resources having becomeconsiderably impaired, among other things by themaintenance of a numerous family, Jean Baptistebeing his eleventh child, he found it necessary toeducate his sons for some useful profession. Severalof them entered the army, and the subject of thepresent notice was destined for the church, whichat that period offered many lucrative and influentialappointments to the members of noble families.To qualify him for this office, he was sent to studyunder the Jesuits at Amiens, with whom he remainedfor a considerable time. From the first, however, heappears to have had some aversion to the professionselected for him by his father, and this was increasedto positive dislike by the mode of life which he wasobliged to lead at college. His active and excursivemind submitted with impatience to the punctiliousrestraints of college discipline, and the mechanicalroutine of studies prescribed indiscriminately to all,without reference to natural bias or acquired predilection.Most of his companions were activelyengaged in

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