» » An Irish Cousin; vol. 2/2

An Irish Cousin; vol. 2/2

An Irish Cousin; vol. 2/2
Category:
Title: An Irish Cousin; vol. 2/2
Release Date: 2019-01-06
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
Count views: 66
Read book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 21

[Text decoration not available.]

{i} 

AN IRISH COUSIN.

BY
GEILLES HERRING AND MARTIN ROSS.

IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.
[Text decoration not available.]
LONDON:
RICHARD BENTLEY AND SON,
Publishers in Ordinary to Her Majesty the Queen.
1889.
(All rights reserved.)

{ii} 

{iii} 

[Text decoration not available.]
CONTENTS.

PART II.
THE COST OF IT.
(Continued.)
CHAPTER II.
 PAGE
Supper Extras1
“All night has the casement jessamine stirred
To the dancers dancing in tune.”
“Must you go?
That cousin here again? He waits outside?”
CHAPTER III.
Mr. Croly’s Study18
“Love the gift, is love the debt.”
“Like bitter accusation, even to death,
Caught up the whole of love, and uttered it.”
{iv}
CHAPTER IV.
Myross Churchyard32
“O fair, large day!
The unpractised sense brings heavings from a sea of life too broad.”
“Such seemed the whisper at my side.
‘What is it thou knowest, sweet voice?’ I cried.
‘A hidden hope,’ the voice replied.”
CHAPTER V.
Enter Willy54
“Oh, the little more, and how much it is!
And the little less, and what worlds away!”
“Love with bent brows went by,
And with a flying finger swept my lips.”
CHAPTER VI.
The Hand at the Gate74
“Which do you pity the most of us three?”
CHAPTER VII.
This Hidden Tide of Tears95
“Look in my face; my name is Might-have-been.”
“Ah me! my heart, rememberest thou that hour,
When foolish hope made parting almost bright?
Hadst thou not then some warning of thy doom?”
{v}
CHAPTER VIII.
Pain111
“Go from me. Yet I know that I shall stand
Henceforward in thy shadow.”
CHAPTER IX.
Garden Hill131
“Was this to meet? Not so; we have not met.”
PART III.
PROFIT AND LOSS.
CHAPTER I.
A Threat149
“With morning wakes the will, and cries,
‘Thou shalt not be the fool of loss.’
“A night of mystery. Strange sounds are swept
Through the dim air.”
CHAPTER II.
But where is County Guy?173
“What shall assuage the unforgotten pain,
And teach the unforgetful to forget?”
{vi}
CHAPTER III.
Love’s Labour’s Lost186
Uncover ye his face,’ she said;
‘Oh, changed in little space!’
“When Pity could no longer look on Pain.”
CHAPTER IV.
Storm197
“And all talk died, as in a grove all song
Beneath the shadow of some bird of prey;
Then a long silence came upon the hall,
And Modred thought, ‘The time is hard at hand.’
“In the shaken trees the chill stars shake.
Hush! Heard you a horse tread as you spake,
Little Brother?”
CHAPTER V.
Good-bye211
“Since there’s no help, come, let us kiss and part.”
Not my pain.
My pain was nothing; oh, your poor, poor love,
Your broken love!’
CHAPTER VI.
A Resolve223
“Sad is my fate; I must emigrate
To the wilds of Amerikee.”
“In the fresh fairness of the spring to ride,
As in the old days when he rode with her.”
{vii}
CHAPTER VII.
Through the French Window239
“Remorse she ne’er forsakes us;
A bloodhound staunch, she tracks our rapid step.”
“A thousand fantasies
Begin to throng into my memory,
Of calling shapes and beckoning shadows dire.”
CHAPTER VIII.
Poul-na-coppal258
“The rose-winged hours that flutter in the van
Of Love’s unquestioning, unrevealèd span—
Visions of golden futures; or that last
Wild pageant of the accumulated past
That clangs and flashes for a drowning man.”
“Wenn ich in deine Augen seh
So schwindet all’ mein Leid und Weh.”
CHAPTER IX.
A Heritage of Woe274
“Love that was dead and buried, yesterday
Out of his grave rose up before my face.”
“Not by appointment do we meet delight and joy—
They heed not our expectancy;
But, at some turning in the walks of life,
They on a sudden clasp us with a smile.”
{viii}
CHAPTER X.
Lex Talionis295
“And now Love sang; but his was such a song,
So meshed with half-remembrance hard to free.”

[Text decoration not available.]

{1}

[Text decoration not available.]
AN IRISH COUSIN.

PART II.
THE COST OF IT.
(Continued.)

CHAPTER II.
SUPPER EXTRAS.

“All night has the casement jessamine stirred
To the dancers dancing in tune.”
“Must you go?
That cousin here again? He waits outside?”

We were at supper. The chaperons had at length completed theirwell-earned repast, and had returned, flushed and loquacious, to thedancing-room, yielding{2} their places to the hungry throng who had beenwaiting outside the door.

The last waltz had been played by Miss Sissie Croly, in good time andwith considerable spirit, an act of coquettish self-abnegation whichelicited many tender reproaches from her forsaken partner. Making themost of the temporary improvement in the music, Nugent and I had dancedwithout stopping, until a series of sensational flourishes announcedthat the end of the waltz was at hand. After it was over, he hadsuggested supper, and we had secured a small table at the end of thesupper-room, from which, in comparative quiet, we could view the doingsof the rest of the company. I was guiltily conscious of the large “W”scrawled across the supper extras on my card; but a latent rebellionagainst my cousin’s unauthorized appropriation conspired with a{3}distinct desire for food to harden my heart. I made up my mind to dowhat seemed good to me about one at least of the extras, and dismissedfor the present all further thought of Willy and his possiblegrievances.

I found myself possessed of an excellent appetite. Nugent’s invention asa caterer soared above the usual chicken and jelly, and we both madewhat, in the land of my birth, would be described as a “square meal.”

Meanwhile, the centre table was surrounded by what looked like aconvivial party of lunatics. Miss Burke and Dr. Kelly had set theexample of decorating themselves with the coloured paper caps containedin the crackers, and the other guests had instantly adopted the idea.Mob-caps, night-caps, fools’-caps, and sun-bonnets nodded in nightmarearray round{4} the table, Miss Burke’s long red face showing to greatadvantage beneath a pale-blue, tissue-paper tall hat.

“I feel I have been very remiss in not offering to pull a cracker withyou,” said Nugent, “but I am afraid they have all been used up by thistime!”

“Why did I not go in to supper with Dr. Kelly?” I said regretfully. “Ifthe worst came to the worst, I am sure he would have taken off his ownsun-bonnet and put it on my head!”

“Go in with him next time,” suggested Nugent. “He always goes in tosupper two or three times, and works his way each time down the tablelike a mowing-machine, leaving nothing behind him. At the masonic ballin Cork he was heard saying to his sisters, as they were going in tosupper, ‘Stuff, ye divils! there’s ice!{5}

“Quite right, too,” I said, beginning upon the tipsy cake which Nugenthad looted for our private consumption. “I always make a point ofstuffing when there is ice. However, I think on the whole I have hadenough of Dr. Kelly for one evening. I have danced once with him, and Isuppose it is because he is at least a foot shorter than I am that hemakes himself about half his height when he is dancing with me. But Ithink all small men do that; the taller their partner, the more theybend their knees.”

Nugent laughed. “I have been watching you dancing with all sorts andconditions of men, and wondering what you thought of them. I alsowondered if you would find them sufficiently amusing to induce you tostay on till No. 18?” he said, putting his elbows on the table andlooking questioningly at me.{6}

“Oh, I hope so—at least—of course, that depends on your mother,” Ianswered.

“Should you care to stay? As in that case I think I could manage tosquare my mother.”

“It would be better not to bother her about it, perhaps—of course, itmight be very pleasant to stay,” I answered confusedly.

The way in which he had asked the question had given me a strangesensation for a moment.

“I dare say it is not any argument, but I shall be very sorry if yougo.”

I went on with the buttoning of my gloves without answering.

“For one reason, I should like you to see what it gets like towards theend.”

Nugent’s eyes were fixed on mine across the intervening woodcock andtipsy cake with more inquiry than seemed necessary,{7} but as he finishedspeaking a little troop of men came in together for a supplementarysupper, and I forgot everything but my own guilty conscience, as amongthem I saw Willy. It was, however, evident that he had not come with anygluttonous intent, for, after a cursory look round the room overpeople’s heads, he walked out.

“Did you see Willy?” I said, in a scared whisper.

“Yes, perfectly. He was probably looking for you.”

“Oh, I know he was!” I said, beginning to gather up my fan and otherbelongings. “I ought to go at once. I am engaged to him for the extras.”

“Are you afraid of Willy?” returned Nugent, without taking his elbowsoff the table, or making any move.

“No, of course I’m not. But I don’t like to throw him over.{8}

“Oh, I see!” he said, still without moving, and regarding me with anaggravating amusement.

“Well, I am going——” I began, when a hand was laid on my arm.

“I am delighted to hear it,” said Connie’s voice, “as we want thistable. Get up, Nugent, and give me your chair. Nothing would induce meto sit at that bear-garden”—indicating the larger table. “What do youthink I heard Miss Donovan say to that little Beamish man—EnglishTommy—as I was making my way up here? ‘Now, captain, if you say thatagain, I’ll pelt my plate of jelly at you!’ And I haven’t the leastdoubt that at this moment his shirt-front is covered with it.”

“Oh, all right,” said Nugent, slowly getting up, “you can have thistable; we were just going. Miss Sarsfield is very anxious to find Willy.She says she{9} is going to dance all the extras with him.”

“Then she is rather late,” replied Connie, unconcernedly. “CaptainForster, go at once and get me some game-pie. Don’t tell me there’snone; I couldn’t bear it. Well, my dear,” she continued, “perhaps youare not aware that the extras are all over, and No. 12 is going on now?”

“Have you seen Willy anywhere?” I asked, feeling rather than seeing thesisterly eye of facetious insinuation that Connie directed at

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 21
Comments (0)
Free online library ideabooks.net