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Outdoor Life and Indian Stories

Outdoor Life and Indian Stories
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Title: Outdoor Life and Indian Stories
Release Date: 2019-03-03
Type book: Text
Copyright Status: Public domain in the USA.
Date added: 27 March 2019
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"FROM WHERE THE SUN NOW STANDS, I FIGHT NO MOREAGAINST THE WHITE MAN."


OUTDOOR LIFE and
INDIAN STORIES


MAKING OPEN AIR LIFE
ATTRACTIVE TO YOUNG AMERICANS
BY TELLING THEM ALL ABOUT WOODCRAFT, SIGNS AND
SIGNALING, THE STARS, FISHING, CAMPING, CAMP COOKING,
HOW TO TIE KNOTS AND HOW TO MAKE FIRE WITHOUT
MATCHES, AND MANY OTHER FASCINATING OPEN
AIR PURSUITS
——ALSO——
STORIES OF NOTED HUNTERS AND SCOUTS
GREAT INDIANS AND WARRIORS, INCLUDING DANIEL
BOONE, KIT CARSON, GENERAL CUSTER, PONTIAC,
TECUMSEH, KING PHILIP, BLACK HAWK, BRANDT, SITTING
BULL, AND A HOST OF OTHERS WHOSE NAMES
ARE FAMOUS
ALL OF THEM TRUE AND INTERESTING

BY EDWARD S. ELLIS
Author of the Celebrated "Ellis Books" of Adventure,
"The Deerfoot Series," "Youth's History of the United
States," Etc., Etc.
PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED
WITH LITHOGRAPH COLOR PLATES, HALF-TONE
ENGRAVINGS AND LINE DRAWINGS


Copyright 1912By L. T. MYERS


CONTENTS

Outdoor Life for Young Americans9
How to Live in the Woods
Making a Camp10
How to Build a Lean-To
How to Make Fire Without Matches11
Using the Fire-Drill
How to Get Pure Water13
The Indian Filter
How to Cook in Camp15
Utensils and Simple Recipes
How to Make a Bow and Arrow17
A Safe and Powerful Weapon
How to Read Signs and Signals19
Indian Signs and the Wig-Wag System
How to Tie Knots22
All the Best Knots Explained and Illustrated
How to Find Your Way by the Stars26
The Heavens at Night
What to Do in Case of Accident27
First Aid to the Injured
The Original Americans33
The Indian Tribes
The Original Emperors of Virginia40
Powhatan and Opecancanough
The Great Conspiracy54
A Wily Chieftain and His Secret
Adventures in New England61
The Indians and the Pilgrims
The Uncrowning of a King76
Philip's Adventures and Death
A Man of Mark Among the Delawares98
Story of Tammany, White Eyes, and Captain Pipe
The Greatest of Indian Conspirators106
Pontiac, Chief of the Ottawas
A Besieged Garrison121
The Attack on Detroit
A Good Indian129
Little Carpenter, the Cherokee
A Mighty Mingo Chieftain135
Logan, the Orator and Warrior
An Indian Demosthenes144
Red Jacket, the Seneca
Little Turtle149
First an Enemy, then a Friend
Warrior and Knight159
Buckongahelas, the Delaware Chief
A Famous Mohawk Chief169
Adventure of Brandt, the Half-Breed
A Chieftain on the Warpath176
Adventures of Tecumseh, the Shawanoe
Adventures of Weatherford192
Chief of the Creek Confederacy
Fighting Against Fate202
Black Hawk and His War
The Hero of the Everglades219
Osceola and the Seminole War
Sitting Bull, the Medicine Man233
The Last Great Indian Uprising

[9]

OUTDOOR LIFE FORYOUNG AMERICANS

What boy can resist the call of the woods, the desireto know the forest and its furred and feathered inhabitants,the fish, the insects, the plants? But to gatherthis knowledge in safety the boy must first learn the waysof the woods, the life of the camper, how to cook andfind his way by the stars, how to tie knots and what todo in case of accident, the language of signs and thesecrets of the trail. There is no better way to do thisthan to study the methods of the Indians, the most expertwoodsmen the world has known. At their call the forestproduced food, drink, clothes, ornaments and all the necessitiesof life. Let us see how they managed this.

THE CAMP


[10]

Making a Camp

METHOD OF THATCHING A LEAN-TO

The first thing to be considered on going into the forestis the camp where the night is to be spent. In choosing aplace for this see that there is fresh water, wood for the fireand brush-wood for building a "lean-to," or hut, at hand. Itis well to build on a dry, level place, with just enough slopeto the ground to insure the water running away in case ofrain. The Indians used to live in huts thatched with brush-wood,and these are best made by building what is knownas a "lean-to." Look for two trees standing from eight toten feet apart on your camping place, with branches fromsix to eight feet above the ground. By placing a pole fromone tree to the other in the crotches and leaning other polesagainst this one, brush-wood can be woven in to form a verygood roof. Branches of the balsam or hemlock are best forthis purpose, and the needles should point down. It is wellto collect as many soft, thick tips of trees of this characteras possible, both for the thatching and to make the beds.[11]Cover the floor of the "lean-to" with these tips thickly andlay the rubber blankets on top, rubber side down. Be sureto make the head of your bed toward the inside and awayfrom the opening. You will find that this makes a verycomfortable bed.

HOW TO BUILD A LEAN-TO


How to Make Fire Without Matches

In olden times, before the Indians had matches, and evenbefore they had the flint and steel that our grandfathers usedfor making fire, they used rubbing-sticks. Many people havetried to make fire in this manner, but few have succeeded.[12]As a matter of fact, it is not a very difficult thing to do ifyou know how, as the Indians did. In fact, they grew soexpert that they could make fire almost as quickly as we canstrike a match. The easiest and surest method of doing thisis to use the bow-drill. The tools necessary consist of a bow,or bent stick, about two feet long, with a stout leather cordattached to each end. The drill consists of a straight pieceof wood pointed at each end. One end of this rests in a drill-socket,which is simply a piece of wood with a small notchin it for the top of the fire-drill. This piece of wood is heldin the hand, while the other end of the fire-drill is placed inthe fire-board. This consists of a thin piece of wood withsmall pits cut about half an inch from the edge, and with anotch extending from the edge into the middle of the pit. Theleather thong is given a single turn about the fire-drill andthen by drawing the bow backward and forward the drill iscaused to rotate very rapidly in the fire-board. After a shortwhile the dust which comes out of the notch grows hot andbecomes a glowing coal, which can be easily ignited into ablazing fire.

THE FIRE-DRILL

There are many ways of building a camp fire, but the[13]Indian's way is the best. The Indians always used to laughat the white men because they said that they built such a bigfire they could not get near it, while the Indian built a littlefire and could get close to it. The fire must be built systematically.First, get dry, small dead branches, twigs, firbranches and other inflammable material and place theseloosely on the ground, being sure that the air can draw underand upward through the mass. Next place some heaviersticks in the form of a pyramid with the tops of the sticksclose together, and so on, untilyou have built the campfire to the required size.

HOW TO BUILD A FIRE

Takeevery care to prevent thespreading of the fire, and donot build it too close to thetent or to inflammable pinetrees. There is always dangerof starting a disastrousforest fire by carelessness witha small camp fire. Remember that it is criminal to leave a burningfire, and always to put the fire out with water or earth. Ifthe fire is to be used for cooking, it is well to confine the heatbetween two large logs, or, if baking is to be done on it, itis best to build an oven with large stones. But the Indianswere usually content with open fire.


How to Get Pure Water

A very necessary item for the camp is pure water. Ifthis cannot be obtained from a nearby spring which hasgood, clear water, or from a clean stream, it is possible tofilter it in the same way that the Indians did. They had away of purifying water from a pond or swamp by digging ahole about one foot across and down about six inches belowthe water level, a few feet from the pond. After it wasfilled with water they baled it out quickly, repeating the[14]baling process about three times. After the third baling thehole would fill with filtered water.

A STONE OVEN

If there is a stream at hand large enough to swim in,it is well to remember that if you work your hands and kickyour feet you can stay above water for some time, even withyour clothes on. Do not make the mistake of going into thewater too soon after eating, for cramps are apt to result,causing a serious accident. The Indians have a method ofprotecting themselves from cramps. Coming to a bathingpool, the Indian swimmer, before entering the water, vigorouslyrubs the pit of his stomach with the dry palm of hishand. This rubbing probably takes a minute; then hedashes cold water all over his stomach, and continues therubbing for another minute; and after that he is ready forhis plunge.


[15]

How to Cook in Camp

The problems of the camp cook are not nearly so greatas they seem at first glance. The essential thing is to selectyour cooking equipment and supplies wisely and learn a fewsimple recipes in advance. An excellent cooking kit for along outing is composed of the following utensils: One 12-inchfrying pan, one coffee pot, one 6-quart pail, one canopener, six air-tight canisters for coffee, tea, sugar, salt, etc.,a knife, fork, teaspoon, tablespoon, plate, bowl and cup foreach person in the party. All of these may be nested in a12-quart pail, which will be found useful in many waysabout the camp. If only a short hike is to be taken, however,a much smaller kit may be taken. An ideal kit for thispurpose is used by the United States Army and may beobtained from outfitters or army stores anywhere. This consistsof a frying pan and plate which can be locked togetherby the handle of the frying pan to form a baker. In this aknife, fork and spoon can be carried. With the addition ofa canteen and large tin cup, this kit can be made to performwonders in the cooking line on a trip of several days' duration.For a longer trip the larger kit is recommended.

The supplies to be taken along depend upon the tastesof the campers, the length of the trip and the convenienceof transportation. Of course, if the trip is to be made bywater it is easier to manage a greater weight than wouldbe the case if it must be carried, a point to be kept in mindin selecting the supplies.

For a trip of about one week the following suppliesare advised in quantities to suit the number of people in theparty: Coffee, tea, sugar, salt, pepper, condensed milk (unsweetened),lard, bacon, flour, baking soda, bread and potatoes.This list can be enlarged to advantage by the addition of aham, butter (if it can be kept cool), pickles, jam and additionalvegetables, but it is well to keep the outfit down tothe lowest point consistent with comfort. Eggs should be[16]taken if it is possible to carry them safely. They are nowsold in packages which will stand moderately rough handling.Remember that a bed of hot coals is best for

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